Super Typhoon Haiyan Relief Fund

 
$1,618,423 $131,577
Raised Remaining

This report was written by Alison Carlman, GlobalGiving's Senior Manager of Communications and Marketing.

At the end of last year, I had the opportunity to travel to the Philippines and to visit GlobalGiving’s local partners that have been driving the Super Typhoon Haiyan recovery effort. (The storm was known locally as Typhoon Yolanda.) One year after the disaster, some of the most powerful remnants from the destruction have become benign landmarks and regular photo ops for visitors, like the 3,000 ton ship that washed into a community in Tacloban City, pictured above. This juxtaposition of the terrifying and the mundane is a fitting metaphor for the road to recovery.

This short video brings to you to some of the people and issues I came across in the Philippines one year after Haiyan. (I’m narrating the video.)

Click to play video on GlobalGiving.org/haiyan

On my long flight home I reflected back on my many conversations in the Philippines; here are some observations that kept running through my mind:

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 8.57.51 PM1. There is a vital need for ongoing support after disasters fade from the headlines.  Since Haiyan struck the Philippines last year, donors like you on GlobalGiving have delivered nearly $2.4 million in support of 33 locally-driven nonprofits performing relief and recovery work. When images of the disaster were flooding the newsfeeds, it was relatively easy for us and our nonprofit partners to mobilize donor support. However, as Natalie from International Disaster Volunteers explains in the video, as the work turns from rescue and relief to long-term recovery, many communities are left without the resources they need to get back on their feet.

One the tools we have for addressing these longer-term needs in disaster-affected areas are anniversary campaigns. On the one-year anniversary of Typhoon Haiyan we held a matching campaign, offering $100,000 in matching funds for organizations still working in the Haiyan-affected areas. This recent campaign helped Filipino organizations raise an additional $103,773 from 405 donors for ongoing recovery work after Haiyan. The matching incentives motivate donors to give to support ongoing needs. These donations alone this won’t rebuild the Philippines, but they are an important part of reinforcing the links between local communities and the global community of donors.

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 8.58.08 PM2. Disasters highlight underlying needs for development. When I asked Filipinos about the largest need one year after Haiyan, many people said “livelihoods.” But interestingly, they couldn’t agree on whether the livelihoods situation was better or worse than before the disaster (and the international aid response that followed). To me, this underscores the fact that underemployment is an ongoing issue in the Philippines, and it’s simply one that’s been exacerbated by the natural disasters—including Haiyan.

Philippine Business for Social Progress, represented by Jay in the video, is a large civil society organization that is funding cash-for-work programs for local villagers who want to re-plant their lost mangroves. This program not only addresses the livelihood issue, but also the deforestation and damage to local watersheds and ecosystems, problems that have existed for years and whose effects  were only compounded by the disaster. Livelihood and ecosystem programs generally fall in the category of ongoing needs for ‘development,’ not just disaster relief, but they can spell the difference between a disaster setting back a community for decades or allowing them to cope—and move on, ultimately making communities more resilient. That’s why our ‘disaster’ strategy starts and ends with supporting local development efforts.

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 8.56.24 PM3. Disasters can be an opportunity to build local capacity. When disasters do happen, we work to get leaders like Elmer and his organization, WAND, the immediate funding they need to respond, and then we help them leverage those disasters as a way to build skills, expertise, and awareness of ongoing structural issues in their communities. I’ve emailed back and forth with Elmer nearly a dozen times since my visit, and I’ve seen how he’s now developing relationships with the many new donors that WAND acquired while they were in disaster-response mode. On the one-year anniversary campaign, Elmer is testing new ways of engaging donors around deadlines and matching incentives, all while building his own networks and  fundraising skills. In building his fundraising capacity he’s also building toward sustainability.

When I asked Filipinos if they feared another big storm, every one of them said yes. For many, it wasn’t a question of “if” another devastating typhoon would happen, but “when.” (In fact, in just the 2 months that I’ve been home, the Philippines has already been hit by some very scary storms.) I’m glad to know that for Natalie, Jay, Elmer, and many other local leaders, GlobalGiving is a long-term partner in their growth, learning, and capacity, as they keep their eyes on development and resilience in the Philippines.

sdAt the end of last year, I had the opportunity to travel to the Philippines and to visit GlobalGiving’s local partners that have been driving the Super Typhoon Haiyan recovery effort. (The storm was known locally as Typhoon Yolanda.) One year after the disaster, some of the most powerful remnants from the destruction have become benign landmarks and regular photo ops for visitors, like this 3,000 ton ship that washed into a community in Tacloban City. This juxtaposition of the terrifying and the mundane is a fitting metaphor for the complex road to recovery.

This short video brings to you to some of the people and issues I came across in the Philippines one year after Haiyan.(I’m narrating the video.)

Click to watch a short video about GlobalGiving's visit to the Philippines one year after Typhoon Haiyan

Click to watch a short video about GlobalGiving’s visit to the Philippines one year after Typhoon Haiyan

On my long flight home I reflected back on my many conversations in the Philippines; here are some observations that kept running through my mind:

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 8.57.51 PM1. There is a vital need for ongoing support after disasters fade from the headlines.  Since Haiyan struck the Philippines last year, donors on GlobalGiving have delivered nearly $2.4 million in support of 33 locally-driven nonprofits performing relief and recovery work. When images of the disaster were flooding the newsfeeds, it was relatively easy for us and our nonprofit partners to mobilize donor support. However, as Natalie from International Disaster Volunteers explains in the video, as the work turns from rescue and relief to long-term recovery, many communities are left without the resources they need to get back on their feet.

One the tools we have for addressing these longer-term needs in disaster-affected areas is the anniversary campaign. On the one-year anniversary of Typhoon Haiyan we held a matching campaign, offering $100,000 in matching funds for organizations still working in the Haiyan-affected areas. This recent campaign helped Filipino organizations raise an additional $103,773 from 405 donors for ongoing recovery work after Haiyan. The matching incentives motivate donors to give to support ongoing needs. These donations alone this won’t rebuild the Philippines, but they are an important part of reinforcing the links between local communities and the global community of donors.

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 8.58.08 PM2. Disasters highlight underlying needs for development. When I asked Filipinos about the largest need one year after Haiyan, many people said “livelihoods.” But interestingly, they couldn’t agree on whether the livelihoods situation was better or worse than before the disaster (and the international aid response that followed). To me, this underscores the fact that underemployment is an ongoing issue in the Philippines, and it’s simply one that’s been exacerbated by the natural disasters—including Haiyan.

PBSP, represented by Jay in the video, is a large civil society organization that is funding cash-for-work programs for local villagers who want to re-plant their lost mangroves. This program not only addresses the livelihood issue, but also the deforestation and damage to local watersheds and ecosystems, problems that have existed for years and whose effects were only compounded by the disaster. Livelihood and ecosystem programs generally fall in the category of ongoing needs for ‘development,’ not just disaster relief, but they can spell the difference between a disaster setting back a community for decades or a community being able to cope and move on. That’s why our ‘disaster’ strategy starts and ends with supporting local development efforts.

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 8.56.24 PM3. Disasters can be an opportunity to build local capacity. When disasters do happen, we work to get leaders like Elmer and his organization, WAND, the immediate funding they need to respond, and then we help them leverage those disasters as a way to build skills, expertise, and awareness of ongoing structural issues in their communities. I’ve emailed back and forth with Elmer nearly a dozen times since my visit, and I’ve seen how he’s developing the relationships with the many donors that WAND acquired while they were in disaster-response mode. On the one-year anniversary campaign, Elmer is testing new ways of engaging donors around deadlines and matching incentives, all while building his own networks and fundraising skills. In building his fundraising capacity he’s also building toward sustainability.

When I asked Filipinos if they feared another big storm, every one of them said yes. For many, it wasn’t a question of “if” another devastating typhoon would happen, but “when.” (In fact, in just the 2 months since I returned, the Philippines has already been hit by some very scary storms.) I’m glad to know that for Natalie, Jay, Elmer, and many other local leaders, GlobalGiving is a long-term partner in their growth, learning, and capacity, as they keep their eyes on development and resilience in the Philippines.

- See more at: http://blog.globalgiving.org/2015/01/15/disasters-and-development-reflections-from-the-philippines-after-typhoon-haiyan/#sthash.DdvR1F4l.dpuf

Links:

Children survivors, photo courtesy of Mercy Corps
Children survivors, photo courtesy of Mercy Corps

Almost one year ago, Super Typhoon Haiyan became one of the strongest storms on record to devastate the Philippines. Immediately after the Typhoon, we worked with relief agencies to provide food, water and supplies to many displaced families. In the weeks and months that came later, our more than 20 of our partner organizations in the Philippines have shifted their focus toward long-term recovery.

Peace Winds America (PWA), is still working to  restore the livelihoods of six barangays (villages) on the Busuanga Island effected by Super Typhoon Haiyan.  Your donations provided boat repair supplies , fishing gear, livestock (swine, chicken, water buffalo), farm tools, seeds for rice, corn, root crops and vegetables. PWA has also implemented a communal seed bank program. They are also working to prepare affected communities for future disasters by conducting disaster mitigation education and training. This training and support is helping local leaders understand and implement programs to make their areas more disaster resilient. 

Water, Agroforestry, Nutrition and Development Foundation (WAND) has been able to help survivors in Ormoc City, Albuera, Tacloban and Palo in a number of ways. Through a safe sanitation initiative in the provinces of Samar and Leyte, they have been able to provide low-cost toilets to these communities. Local villagers helped install the toilets themselves! WAND’s food security initiative has also helped community members develop their own sustainable food supply. Your donations  provided communities with high-valued vegetable seeds, organic fertilizer and training so villagers can properly maintain their crops. This initiative has really gotten everyone in the communities involved, creating a great sense of camaraderie and even providing a good way for the youth to make good use of their free time.

Architecture for Humanity has been working on reconstructing Picas Elementary School in Tanauan, Leyte. Typhoon Haiyan left the school with roof damage, window and shutter damage, and water damage throughout the building. But the goal of Architecture for Humanity’s work is to focus on long- term solutions rather than “band-aid” fixes in response to disasters. Two of Architecture for Humanity’s program directors participated in a collaborative workshop to help leaders in Leyte become a more disaster-resilient community.

Of course, all of this great work in response to Super Typhoon Haiyan is only possible thanks to your great support!

Next week, GlobalGiving will be visiting the people in the Philippines that have been working so hard to rebuild after this terrible tragedy. What questions do you have for these organizations?  Let us know what’s on your mind in the comments and we’ll get back to you when we return in a few weeks.

Thank you again for giving through GlobalGiving. When you give through GlobalGiving, you’re not only investing in immediate disaster relief, but you’re ensuring that survivors of events like Typhon Haiyan will be supported for the long-haul, and will be able to build more resilient communities for the future.

Photo courtesy of Peace Winds America
Photo courtesy of Peace Winds America
Photo courtesy of WAND
Photo courtesy of WAND
Photo courtesy of WAND
Photo courtesy of WAND
Photo courtesy of Architecture for Humanity
Photo courtesy of Architecture for Humanity
Children
Children's Joy Foundation provides new boats

On behalf of all of our nonprofit partners and communities in the Philippines we would like to send a big thank you for supporting the relief and recovery effort after Super Typhoon Haiyan.  As we enter the new year, millions of people remain displaced, but GlobalGiving partners and donors like you are making a difference in these lives.

More than 25 organizations working in the Philippines have already benefited from recovery funds through GlobalGiving, and we recently sent 20 additional grants to our partners!  This recent round of funding is supporting groups that are shifting their work from immediate relief to long-term recovery.  At the bottom of this email you’ll see a full list of all the organizations included in our most recent grant round, but we wanted to highlight three specific organizations so you can better see the impact of your dollars:

Children’s Joy Foundation ($80,000) has seven Children’s Residential Centers in the Philippines that provide food, shelter, clothing, and education to poor children throughout the country. Since Haiyan hit the Philippines in November, Children’s Joy Foundation distributed relief food and provided hot meals to evacuees, provided a generator that gave light to more than 500 families, distributed fishing boats to families along the coast, constructed a day care center, and held a holiday party for hundreds of children between 3-14 years old.  In this long-term recovery phase, they will continue to support the livelihood of small fishermen in Leyte Province, including distributing fishing boats to coastal communities. 

Water, Agroforestry, Nutrition and Development Foundation ($50,000) is a local organization that has been carrying out relief efforts in the municipalities of Albuera, Dulag, Palo, Capoocan, and Kangasince the typhoon hit in November.  WAND has provided safe sanitation through low-cost toilets and hygiene kits, vegetable seeds and other planting materials, emergency food packs in hard-to-reach areas, and provided local building materials to build Filipino-style homes.  They will continue the food security and hygiene-related relief activities they have been conducting, but will also add a coconut and banana replanting program to provide additional economic and food security for farmers in the areas who lost their crops in the typhoon.

Mercy in Action Vineyard, Inc ($30,000) is a nonprofit that has been providing free maternal and childcare since 1992.  They are based outside the disaster area in Olongapo, Philippines, but after the typhoon, they loaded their ambulance with medical and birth supplies and drove and ferried 36 hours to Leyte Island to set up a mobile birth tent and emergency medical center.  Within just a few weeks, 203 pregnant women and 250 breastfeeding women were benefitting from their daily feeding program, 295 women received prenatal exams, they delivered 42 babies, conducted 68 postpartum visits, and distributed 391 boxes of high protein supplements and 427 vitamin packets.  This support from GlobalGiving is helping them fulfill their commitment to feed and care for every woman they encounter who was pregnant when Typhoon Haiyan hit Leyte through their delivery and postpartum recovery period.

20 organizations received relief funds this month
20 organizations received relief funds this month
WAND community members thank you!
WAND community members thank you!
Mercy in Action community and staff
Mercy in Action community and staff
Civic Force provides relief packages
Civic Force provides relief packages

On November 8, 2013, one of the most severe storms ever recorded hit the Philippines.  With a width of 370 miles and gusts as strong as 235 MPH, Super Typhoon Haiyan (locally known as Yolanda) affected more than 13 million Filipinos.  More than a million homes were destroyed or damaged, and close to 4.5 million people were displaced. 

GlobalGiving donors like you displayed their generosity once again, donating more than $1 million for Haiyan relief efforts in less than a week and a half.  Some gave to our project partners working in the typhoon-affected area, while others opted to have GlobalGiving determine the allocation of grant funds through our Super Typhoon Haiyan Relief Fund.  Within days, we had already made our first disbursement on the ground so that your dollars could immediately begin to provide relief to those affected by this storm. 

GlobalGiving looks at a number of factors when determining grant allocations to ensure that your money is having the biggest impact possible on the relief and recovery effort.  We prioritize local organizations over international organizations because we believe these organizations have the specialized knowledge to be most efficient immediately with each dollar they receive.  We also recognize, however, that in a disaster of this magnitude, the expertise of larger international relief organizations with experience in post-disaster relief efforts is also needed.  We balanced these priorities with an understanding of each organization’s overall capacity, budget size, and history of transparency in the work that they’re accomplishing on the ground to determine the allocations below.  In this first disbursement we prioritized relief activities over recovery, but will shift our funding to recovery efforts in the coming weeks and months.

Below you can see exactly how much has been disbursed to each organization.  The amounts listed represent a combination of both the funds raised by the organization itself on GlobalGiving as well as the grants GlobalGiving has made to the organizations.

We have been in communication with our partners on the ground every day since the typhoon made landfall, and we have heard stories of the devastation this storm has wrecked on communities across the Central Philippines.  Your dollars will be supporting organizations providing food to evacuees, fuel to relief workers to get supplies where they are needed most, locally-made toilets for safe sanitation and more.  We are proud of our many partners working endless hours on the ground to alleviate suffering, and are committed to continue getting funds to the ground quickly.

We’ll continue to keep you updated on how your donations are being used in the coming months.  Thank you again for your generosity.

Doctors Without Borders provides medical care
Doctors Without Borders provides medical care
Asia America Initiative provides relief packages
Asia America Initiative provides relief packages

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Organization

GlobalGiving

Washington, D.C., United States
http://www.globalgiving.org

Project Leader

Britt Lake

Washington, D.C. United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Super Typhoon Haiyan Relief Fund