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Jazmine loves to learn!
Jazmine loves to learn!

Four-year-old Jazmine, of Queets, Washington’s Quinault Indian Reservation, is a lively little chatterbox and without a doubt the most charismatic kid in her preschool class. She takes the lead in games and activities, raises her hand first when her teacher asks a question and sits front and center during read-aloud sessions with Save the Children’s program coordinator, Tracie Kenney.


Save the Children's U.S. programs reached 185,000 children in 17 states and the District of Columbia in 2011.Jazmine’s enthusiasm has been part of her steady transformation— from a tentative to a tenacious learner—made possible by Save the Children’s early education programs in the United States. All told, we served 5,000 infants, toddlers and preschoolers and 15,000 parents, and will bring this much-needed program to another 1,000 children in the next year.


Of course, success begins in the home where families are at the frontline of education. Jazmine’s mother, Yvonne, actively sought out Save the Children’s program for her daughter, and family involvement is integral to children’s progress. Thanks to your generous support, Jazmine and thousands of other children in the United States have developed the necessary skills to succeed in school. “Jazmine is so chatty and social; as I’m sure you’ve noticed,” said her mother, Yvonne. “Whatever she does, it will be big.”


“One day I came across a list of books your child should read by a certain age,” said Jazmine’s mother, Yvonne (pictured with Jazmine). “I recognized most of the books because I read them to Jazmine. It made me so happy that my child was where she needed to be in her development.”

 

Parents Josh and Yvonne lack the means to drive 30 miles to the library. They depend on our program for their children’s books.

The Olympic rainforest surrounding Jazmine’s hometown of Queets, Washington, is in stark contrast with local families’ struggles to make ends meet.

 

Jazmine’s brothers, Adam, 2 (at left), and 5-month-old Hunter, are also enrolled in the early education program and showing progress. Tracie gives most of the credit to Jazmine’s mother. “I can tell that she takes everything I share with her to heart and puts it into practice,” said Tracie.

 

Save the Children’s Tracie Kenny is a central figure in Jazmine’s life, paying visits to her home since she was 2 years old and now working with Jazmine and other Quinault Indian Nation children through home visits and a Save the Children partnership at the local Head Start program.

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Born Too Soon: The Global Action Report on Preterm Birth features the first-ever estimates of preterm birth rates by
country and is authored by a broad group of 45 international multi-disciplinary experts from 11 countries, with almost 50 organizations in support. This report is written in support of all families who have been touched by preterm birth. This report is written in support of the Global Strategy for Women’s and children’s health and the efforts of every Woman every child, led by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Premature babies can be saved now with feasible, cost-effective care
•     Historical data and new analyses show that deaths from preterm birth complications can be reduced by over three-quarters even without the availability of neonatal intensive care.
•     Inequalities in survival rates around the world are stark: half of the babies born at 24 weeks (4 months early) survive in high-income countries, but in low-income settings, half the babies born at 32 weeks (two months early) continue to die due to a lack of feasible, cost-effective care, such as warmth, breastfeeding support, and basic care for infections and breathing difficulties.
•     Over the last decade, some countries have halved deaths due  to preterm birth by ensuring frontline workers are skilled in the care of premature babies and improving supplies of life-saving commodities and equipment.

Download the PDF to read this comprehensive report.

Authors: March of Dimes, PMNCH, Save the Children, WHO. Born Too Soon: The Global Action Report on Preterm Birth. Eds CP Howson, MV Kinney, JE Lawn. World Health Organization. Geneva, 2012.


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Mother and Child in Malawi
Mother and Child in Malawi

Since 2001, Malawi has achieved a 29 percent decline in newborn deaths—from 19,000 per year to 17,000 per year in 2010. In those 10 years, Save the Children, with the support of its many donors, has made significant contributions toward this achievement.

Teaching Others How to Save a Life
Save the Children and partners have trained and supported over 1,700 frontline health workers—often people with little formal education but who are respected in their communities. These health workers counsel mothers, detect life-threatening conditions in newborns and refer them to health facilities when necessary. Today, frontline health workers deliver community-based maternal and newborn care in nearly two-thirds of Malawi’s districts.

Caring for a New Baby
Local customs can sometimes be at odds with what is best for baby and mother, which is why Save the Children promotes and teaches essential newborn care. It starts with prenatal care and includes checkups for newborns in the first two days after birth, when most newborns are at greatest risk. Frontline health workers also educate mothers and caregivers in how to care for their newborns. Today, essential newborn care provides the foundation for Save the Children’s newborn health programs in 18 countries.

Saving Babies Born Too Early or Too Small
“Kangaroo Mother Care” is the whimsical name for an effective way to care for low birth weight and preterm babies. Wrapping a baby skin-to-skin against its mother’s chest (like a kangaroo’s pouch), keeps it warm, encourages breastfeeding and bonding, and prevents infections. Save the Children has promoted Kangaroo Mother Care in Malawi since 2002, and today more than 100 health facilities use this approach. We are working with the government of Malawi to take this practice nationwide.

Additional funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is allowing
Save the Children to analyze results and lessons learned from Malawi’s decade-long program and continue to promote newborn health around the world. 


Melinda Gates in Malawi
In 2010, Melinda Gates visited a district hospital supported by Save the Children in Dowa, Malawi, where Save the Children has trained frontline health workers. Here is a brief excerpt of her assessment of that visit.


“I also visited one of the cities there, Dowa, where the women are going into the facilities just as the government has told them. In fact, the women are going up to four weeks ahead of the birth of their baby. That’s really important because they are then avoiding birth complications that might happen to them out in the village or on the road. I met about 40 women who were waiting at the Dowa district hospital, and it was so interesting to talk to these women. They are such palpable evidence of the real impact these changes are having. And I literally saw mothers and babies that would not be alive today if it weren’t for the improvements that Malawi has been making in these areas.”

Listen to Melinda Gates’ complete impressions of her visit to Malawi atwww.gatesfoundation.org/videos.

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Raya is reaching for excellence in education.
Raya is reaching for excellence in education.

Thanks to your support, Save the Children is inspiring breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and achieving immediate and lasting change in children’s lives by ensuring that they are safe, educated and healthy.

Raya, a 14-year-old Egyptian girl, had always dreamed of attending school, but her father did not believe that women should have a role outside of the home. While reaching manhood is an empowering transition for boys, in many parts of the world, womanhood is quite the opposite.

One hundred million girls in developing countries are taken out of school early to become wives and mothers, with the result that, globally, more than 529 million women are illiterate. This is a great waste of human potential, and the evidence strongly supports the fact that empowering adolescent girls is the key to lifting families out of poverty, empowering communities and perhaps changing the course of an entire nation.

Save the Children is opening doors for girls in more than 15 countries by increasing their access to education, sexual and reproductive health, and training in financial literacy and life skills. One successful program for girls is Ishraq in Egypt.

Ishraq (meaning ‘enlightenment’ in Arabic) is a “second chance” program for out-of-school adolescent girls, most of whom have never attended school or are illiterate. More than 1,000 girls who participate in Ishraq literacy classes are eager to learn: In 2010, 83 percent of the graduates passed the government literacy test and 67 percent entered
formal education programs. Save the Children is now working to bring Ishraq to more than 300 youth centers across the country.

When the Save the Children program promoter came to Raya’s house to tell the family about Ishraq, Raya was thrilled. At first, her father said no, but he eventually relented when Raya’s uncle joined the chorus. Raya has become the first literate female in her family and her father is proud. “Now I am a better person because I know how to read and write, thanks to Ishraq,” she said.

Save the Children’s goal is to bring girls out of the shadows. Through Ishraq and similar Save the Children programs worldwide, girls have the opportunity to achieve their full social and economic potential.

Support Save the Children

Charitable contributions from people like you make it possible for us to support programs for girls like Selena, and so much more. Please support our mission and work around the world with a gift to our Global Action Fund. You can count on us to be good stewards of your generous donation, helping vulnerable children where the need is greatest with whatever they need the most.

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Dear friends and supporters,

It is both exciting and humbling to assume the leadership of Save the Children this month from the extraordinarily capable hands of Dr. Charles MacCormack. Since I joined this remarkable organization almost 14 years ago, I’ve also had the good fortune to work with many of you to help realize our strategic vision for the world’s children.

Whether saving newborns and young children from pneumonia, diarrhea and other treatable diseases or restoring a child’s sense of security in the aftermath of tornadoes and other disasters in the United States and elsewhere, Save the Children is there to help, thanks to you.

After visiting our programs in almost 50 countries, it’s clear to me that your contributions are making a difference in the lives of children around the world.

Just recently I was in Malawi, where I met a young mother named Madalitso Masa. A community health worker trained by Save the Children taught her how to prepare women for a healthy pregnancy. She also learned to educate mothers about good eating habits, breastfeeding and other ways they can ensure their children get a good start in life.

With her son, Patience, sleeping in a cotton sling on her back, she told me how committed she is to giving back to her community. Now she and her husband, Chisomo, are both health workers delivering lifesaving treatments to the mothers and children in their village.

In May of this year, we launched Results for Children to share stories like the one about Madalitso, who is bringing hope to children and families facing the most challenging conditions. We also dedicated a part of our website to sharing those stories, so you can see the impact you’re having on the lives of children from Alabama to Afghanistan—because you decided to invest in Save the Children with your money, your time and, most importantly, your heart. Take a look at www.savethechildren.org/results to see for yourself.

We have ambitious goals that range from expanding our education and health initiatives for American children in need to all 50 states, to creating national movements that change the way governments around the world address maternal and newborn child mortality. We will continue to do our very best to help children everywhere, and we want you to be our partner. Because ensuring that children grow up and have a life worth living matters most to all of us.

Carolyn Miles

President & CEO


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Project Leader

Penelope Crump

Westport, CT United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Save the Children