Safe Water for Indigenous Schools & Villages

 
$2,915
$16,585
Raised
Remaining
Jul 5, 2012

WE REACH OUR 100TH RAIN-CATCHMENT SYSTEM!

Rain-catchment system # 100
Rain-catchment system # 100

Celebrating our ONE HUNDRETH rain catchment system
for indigenous schools without safe water.

schools report their abenteeism rates from sickness drop from
as high as 70% to less than 10%

School principals in the Bocas del Toro region of Panama often report that up to 70% of their students are chronically sick from bad water.  Diarrhea, dysentery and skin diseases cause many indigenous students to miss classes, fall behind and get discouraged. Many then drop out, perpetuating the "cycle of poverty"
among indigenous people from one generation to another. 

OSDW installs rain catchment systems that provide safe, disease-free water from the abundant tropical rains.
The water is used for drinking and cooking school lunches.

Principals report their absenteeism rate dramatically drops to less than 10%
within 3 months of having clean, safe water.

Our rain catchment systems are simple, low-maintenance and last for years,
with only one moving part -- the faucet.  Each system provides safe water for an average
of 120 students and 250 villagers living nearby.  

Our more than one hundred rain catchment systems now bring safe, disease-free water
to 35,000 indigenous students and villagers.

$25 will provide safe water to fifty indigenous students
$50 will provide disease-free drinking water to 125 students.
$100 will provide safe drinking water for 300 students.
$975 will provide a rain-catchment system for an entire school.

(We put your name or that of a loved one on the tank and send
you photos, name of school and a "thank you" scroll signed by
the principal, teachers and all the students.) 


OSDW is an all-volunteer 501 c 3 charity.
No one receives a salary or compensation.

Support Operation Safe Drinking Water
Make a difference in people’s lives you can see with your own eyes.

 

Healthy indigenous children now have safe water
Healthy indigenous children now have safe water
I know I
I know I've made a difference!

Links:

May 16, 2012

UPDATE - a "race against time"

Principal and students celebrate their new tanks
Principal and students celebrate their new tanks

35,000.

That’s how many indigenous children and villagers now have safe, disease-free water from ONE HUNDRED rain-catchment systems we’ve installed in remote indigenous areas where many have died from bad water.

Thousands are in villages in the remote islands of the Bocas del Toro archipelago  -- a major indigenous area of Panama.  Other thousands are in remote, hard-to-reach hill villages where death rates for infants and children ages 1-4 are tragically high.

Michelle, a Peace Corps volunteer leaving after two years of service, said “I’ve been to too many infant funerals.”

If you drank bad water and got sick, you could go to the doctor.  But what can indigenous children in remote villages do?  They suffer prolonged, chronic sickness.

The same rain that creates polluted puddles thirsty kids drink from, can bring life and health if caught in one of our
rain catchment tanks. (See photos below)

 The rainy season down here starts soon. We’re in a race against time to get rain catchment tanks installed for schools and villages whose only water is from puddles or polluted holes in the ground 

You can help win this race against time.

About us:
We’re all volunteers. No one receives a salary or compensation. Your donations go to provide safe water for indigenous children.

-        Joe Bass

Principal and students celebrate their new tanks
Principal and students celebrate their new tanks
A school "well" for 100-plus students
A school "well" for 100-plus students
School fathers help install rain catchment tanks
School fathers help install rain catchment tanks
4-tank MEGA-SYSTEM goes in for large school
4-tank MEGA-SYSTEM goes in for large school
Mother Nature
Mother Nature's Best - safe, clean water
Kids hear school kitchen reopens with safe water
Kids hear school kitchen reopens with safe water

Links:

Apr 30, 2012

NEXT -- OUR 100TH RAIN CATCHMENT SYSTEM

86 y.o chief -"Thank you for helping us."
86 y.o chief -"Thank you for helping us."

April 30th, 2012 

Where the gift of life is given again – every time it rains.

Our 100th rain catchment tank will be installed next week.
We approach this milestone with thanks to all our donors. 

Each tank supplies safe, disease-free water for up to 350 indigenous students and villagers.
35,000 indigenous people now have safe water for years to come.

News -- School sickness rate drops from 75% to 10%

Senorita Belkis Quoroz, principal of the school at Bahia Grande on San Cristobal island
reports the sickness absentee rate among her students dropped from 75% to 10%
two months after the rain catchment tank was installed.

What a difference!

The list of indigenous schools reporting huge drops in sickness rates is long. 
But this list of good news is matched by another list – a list of17 other schools
with a total of 4,000 students still waiting for a rain catchment tank.

Their sickness rates are soaring.   Some of their best students are chronically sick and have dropped out. 
"What a terrible waste," one principal said.

Some schools have had to stop providing nourishing school lunches
for lack of clean cooking water.

The main rainy season has just started.
There’s plenty of safe water falling. 

 3 things you should know about us:

We’re a 501 c 3 charity.
No one receives a salary or compensation.
We’re all volunteers and donors ourselves.

SEVENTEEN schools need rain catchment systems now.
Each system costs $975 installed and lasts for years.
They’re simple, low-maintenance with only one moving part
– the faucet.

Thank you for making a difference!

-Joe

Volunteers - "Your school
Volunteers - "Your school's tank is here."
Another school has safe water
Another school has safe water
The problem - and solution for 1 indigenous school
The problem - and solution for 1 indigenous school
Happy, healthy indigenous kids have safe water
Happy, healthy indigenous kids have safe water
500-plus students will have safe water
500-plus students will have safe water

Links:

Mar 26, 2012

SCHOOL PRINCIPAL NOW HAPPY!

On our way to remote indigenous villages
On our way to remote indigenous villages

Maribel, the principal of the indigenous school at Cauchero, Bocas del Toro Province of Panama was not a happy lady when we met her. Half of her students were absent with stomach problems, diarrhea, dysentery, skin disease and anemia from bad water.

"Some of my brightest kids have dropped out of school from chronic sickness.
They fall behind, get discouraged, and give up." she said.

"They lose not only their health, but their futures, too -- all because of bad water."

Maribel met our boat with a scowl and thrust two bowls at us. One was full of polluted brown water.
"Pour some of your bottled water in the other bowl," she asked.

We did, and she held them both up in front of me.  Their water was heavily polluted.
You couldn't see the bottom of the bowl. The bowl with our bottled water was crystal clear.

"See this. Don't my kids deserve water as good as yours?" she asked.

"That's why we're here," I said, pointing to the water tank our volunteers carried in a
sling from our boat.
(See photos below) .

"I know you should be welcomed with a smile," she said apologetically, then smiled.
"But it's hard to smile when your best students stay home sick, then drop out." 

Our volunteer team got busy and within two hours Maribel had her new rain catchment tank in place.
Our tanks are simple, easy to maintain, have only one moving part -- the faucet --and last for years. 
Rains refill the tank with safe, disease-free water in the tropical downpours common in this area. 

Maribel looked at the dark afternoon rain clouds that were gathering and said with an impish smile,
"I'm too old, but when it pours I'm going  home and dance in the rain." 

Maribel and dedicated school principals like her is why I came out of retiremen at age 71 to
launch Operation Safe Drinking Water, trading my golf shoes for muddy boots.

With financial support from friends like you we'll install our 100th rain catchment tank next month. 

 Maribel's question sticks with me, "don't my kids deserve water as good as yours?"

Yes, Maribel, they do.  

Twenty-two more remote indigenous schools are waiting for rain catchment tanks now. 
We're an all - volunteer charity.
No one receives a salary or compensation.  
We live among the people we serve.  

Thank you for helping us help these twenty-two schools.

- Joe

School principal Maribel. Her smile says it all.
School principal Maribel. Her smile says it all.
Maribel gets her most cherished wish - safe water
Maribel gets her most cherished wish - safe water
Twenty-plus schools are waiting for their tank
Twenty-plus schools are waiting for their tank
Thousands more school children need safe water.
Thousands more school children need safe water.

Links:

Jan 7, 2012

Safe disease-free water for indigenous schools

The problem - and solution for 1 indigenous school
The problem - and solution for 1 indigenous school

 

Iindigenous school principals report back:

"Our absentee rate due to sickness fell from 70% to 15% after
you installed the rain catchment tank. Thank you. " 
Velkis Quiroz - principal, Bahia Grande, Cristobal island. 

"Half our students were out sick at any one time.
Our absenteeism rate is now down
to less than 10%."

-- Delia Vergora - Pfrincipal Nance Risco school

92 rain catchment tanks are now producing safe, disease-free
water for indigenous schools and villages.  The tanks also provide
safe water for school lunches.

The school kitcneh at Nance Risco was closed for four
months due to lack of clean water. Packages of rice and lentils were
stocked high but were unused --and unusable -- without safe water. 

Principal Delia says, " the kids get nourishing food every day now,
thanks to the two rain catchment tanks you installed for us."

35,000 indigenous villagers and children now get safe, dissease-free
water from our 92 rain catchment tanks.  The tanks refill in the regular
tropical rainstorms common to the indigenous communities.

The rain catchment systems are simple, with only one moving part - the faucet.
Surrounding villages use the safe water when school is not in session.

3 things you should know about us

 1 ) We're a 501 c 3 charity.

  2 ) No one receives a salary or compensation

  2 ) We live among the people we serve.

Joe Bass,

School fathers help install rain catchment tanks
School fathers help install rain catchment tanks
Rainwater - it can kill  - or it can save lives
Rainwater - it can kill - or it can save lives
Mega system for 500 plus indigenous students
Mega system for 500 plus indigenous students
Bottom line -- safe water for indigenous students
Bottom line -- safe water for indigenous students

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Project Leader

Joe Bass

Founder / President
Camarillo, CA United States

Where is this project located?