Safe Water for Indigenous Schools & Villages

 
$2,915
$16,585
Raised
Remaining
May 8, 2013

Results of Annual Survey

Thank you so much for donating to Operation Safe Drinking Water! Your generous donations have helped provide contaminate free water to indigenous schools and villages in Panama. Safe drinking water has a huge ripple effect on the populations drinking it, schools especially see this effect. Their kitchens are able to stay open and serve healthy, nutritious lunches to its students. Attendance levels maximize because students are no longer staying home from illnesses due to unsanitary water. In the long run, this makes for educated people living in indigenous villages which in turn helps their economies to grow.

We have gathered the results from our most recent survey and the ripple effects that were explained above are made clearly evident in them. The following are the results:

118 rain catchment systems have been installed in indigenous schools with safe water problems.

35,000 indigenous students now have access to safe water from our work.

3 principals report that absenteeism from water connected diseases has been as high as 50%, but now are down to around 30%.

Principals also report that dropout rates due to sickness from bad water have been as high as 31% of the student populations.  The dropout rates are now down to around 20%.

Health and safe water are connected. With help, the students study and stay in school and succeed. Without safe water, they contract diseases that force them to stay home. They then fall behind which discourages them resulting in large dropout rates.

By supporting Operation Safe Drinking Water you are making a difference in people’s lives that you can see with your own eyes. OSDW is an all-volunteer 501 c 3 charity. No one receives a salary of compensation. That means that 100% of the donations we receive go towards saving the indigenous Guaymi people of Panama’s islands and mainlands. Thank you again for your contributions! 

Links:

Nov 7, 2012

HAPPINESS IS ...making a difference in kids' lives

We saw the difference we made with our own eyes
We saw the difference we made with our own eyes

"Happiness is making a difference in kids' lives we can see with our own eyes." the college students from Iowa said after watching indigenous school children drink from a rain catchment tank they put in the day before.

It rained later that night. The college kids went back the next day to see the pay-off for coming so far.

"No more water from polluted streams" the school's principal said, beaming. When you provide rain-catchment tanks for indigenous schools good things happen fast.

Because it rains almost daily, within weeks the "out sick" rate drops from as high as 50%  of the student body less than 10%.

Chronically sick kids who gave up & dropped out get better and return to school. 

School kitchens closed due to lack of cooking water re-open and start serving nutritious lunches again. 

Good things happen fast. That's why donors who come to help install the tanks they donate smile a lot.

A rain-catchment system costs $975. The tanks refill an average of once a week.  A tank provides safe disease-free water for years to come. 

We just installed our 112th  rain catchment system at Three Mile School in Bocas del Toro province of Panama.  

Come and help install the tank you donate like the folks in the photos.

If you can't come we'll install your tank  for you and send you photos and a "scroll of thanks" signed by all the sudents and teachers. 

Some of the "thank you" scrolls from large schools are 3-4 feet long!  Your donation of any amount will provide safe, disase-free water for indigenous schools that now depend on water from polluted strams
and wells.

Join the smiling folks who've changed lives of indigenous children in need of safe water.

Donate today and smile when you see the photos and hold the long "scroll of thanks". 

Principal (in blue) and donors celebrate!
Principal (in blue) and donors celebrate!
The Lynn family from Wisconsin made a difference!
The Lynn family from Wisconsin made a difference!
Smiles flow like safe water after a rain.
Smiles flow like safe water after a rain.
"Me,too" indigenous girl says."I
"Me,too" indigenous girl says."I'm smiling, too."

Links:

Oct 1, 2012

Do indigenous children deserve a chance, too?

Anita is chronically sick from bad water
Anita is chronically sick from bad water

IT’S ALL ABOUT CHILDREN.

Saving them is our goal out in the indigenous islands of the
Bocas del Toro archipelago of Panama..

It's why we volunteer our time and work. 

(We're an all volunteer charity. No one receives a salary
or compensation.) 

 Infants and the very young are the #1 victims of bad water in the remote
islands.. Their little bodies can't deal with the diseases from bad water -- diarrhea,
dysentery, anemia, intestinal worms. 

Water from a polluted stream or contaminated well is often fatal. 

They're so vulnerable, there's no margin for error. Their little lives are
snuffed out before they've had a chance.  

But the good news is a month after villagers get access to water from
one of our rain catchment tanks the infant and young child death rates
drop to almost zero.

The village "box-makers" -- those who make burial coffins for the smallest children --
are under-employed or out of work. 

The clean, safe  water from our catchment tanks at indigenous schools
saves lives  in the nearby villages, too.  Mothers come daily for safe,
disease-free water for their youngest children. 

An average of 120 students and 250 villagers get all their safe water from
one of our rain catchment tanks.   A 600 gallon tank refills on average of once a
week in the tropical rains common to this area.

A single rain catchment tank can deliver 150,000 gallons of safe,
disease-free water during it's seven years useful life.

Each tank costs only $975 installed at a remote indigenous school or village. 

No one should be dying for a drink of clean water.
Should they? 

Gisela, back to good health!
Gisela, back to good health!
1 tank can deliver 150,000 gallons. Cost: $975
1 tank can deliver 150,000 gallons. Cost: $975
Too little...and too late. The baby didn
Too little...and too late. The baby didn't make it

Links:

Aug 21, 2012

1 School - 36 plastic bottles -- or a tank?

Maribel celebrates her new rain catchment tank
Maribel celebrates her new rain catchment tank

Maribel, principal of the indigenous school at Cauchero,
Bocas del Toro Province of Panama, rounded up 36 small 
jugs
and  plastic containers from a nearby village..

When the rains came she stopped what she was doing and rushed to
put the plastic jugs out to catch rain.  But that was just the start.

She said, "I had to work nonstop to move them around so they'd catch the most rain,
put them upright when 
the wind blew them over, and empty them when they got full
-- then get them back
out again fast. Every drop was precious."

"I was doing a non-stop 'jug-shuffle,' " she laughed. 

"By the time the rains stopped I was so tired I could hardly move.
I started out hoping for rain, but was soon hoping it would stop 
or at least slow down, so I could take a break." 

I called the kids, and they came from their classes to drink their fill.
85 thirsty kids can drink a lot of water, so it was soon gone." 

Operation Safe Drinking Water heard of her dedication to her kids
and loaded a 600-gallon rain catchment tank on board our boat
and headed out to her school.

Half of her students had been out sick from water-borne diseases. 
She says, "now no more than 10%" are out sick.

"Now whens it rains we watch the big tank fill. When we use it up it refills
again in the next rain -- on average about once a week. 
We now have enough clean water 
for our school and the village, too." 

Operation Safe Drinking Water has installed 110
rain catchment systems like Maribel's at indigenous
schools and villages. 

But many more principals still have to do the "jug-shuffle"
when it rains to get safe water for their kids. 

They need your help to get a rain catchment tank of their own. 

No one can live without safe, clean water.

Plastic jugs or a rain catchment tank? 
Your donation can  help make the difference. 

Thank you, 

 

 

We loaded her tank on board and took off
We loaded her tank on board and took off
Safe water flows from Mother Nature to Maribel
Safe water flows from Mother Nature to Maribel
The indigenous homeland of Panama where we work
The indigenous homeland of Panama where we work
A polluted water hole  caused many kids to be sick
A polluted water hole caused many kids to be sick
Maribel celebrates her new rain catchment tank
Maribel celebrates her new rain catchment tank

Links:

Aug 6, 2012

Results Are In - Chiefs & school principals report

Indigenous island chief reports in
Indigenous island chief reports in

Chief on a  remote indigenous island says, " Our children are in school studying, not at home sick."
You made an old man happy!  Thank you."

Principal Velkis Quiroz of Cristobal Island says: "up to 70% of our kids were out sick
from time to time.  Now, it's less than 10%"

Principal Candice of Solate island says: " Our drop - out rate was high. Kids were out sick,
fell behind and dropped out. i expect all our kids to graduate this year." 

We're now about half-way through the  school year down here in the indigenous
areas of Paname, and the results are coming in.

We've been busy. Five tanks at five schools in five days is a torrid pace,.
but we're in a race against time, with children's health at stake.

Too many schools still rely on water from polluted streams &
contaminated "wells," which are just holes at the base of hills.
When it rains, pollutants flow into the wells.

Twenty-one schools are on our "must do soon " list. Over, 3,000
children in those schools need safe water. 

We're an all-volunteer charity. No one receives a salary or compensation.

Thank you for helping indigenous children & schools.

- Joe.. 

Principal Velkis Quiroz (right)
Principal Velkis Quiroz (right)
Rain Catchment tank #100 goes in at remote school
Rain Catchment tank #100 goes in at remote school
School girl takes first drink from new tank.
School girl takes first drink from new tank.
School kids get the news - their new tank is in!
School kids get the news - their new tank is in!
School kitchen closed 2 months reopens, cook says.
School kitchen closed 2 months reopens, cook says.

Links:

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating or by subscribing to this project's RSS feed.

Retired Project

This project is no longer accepting donations.

Still want to help?
Find another project in Panama or in Health that needs your help.

Project Leader

Joe Bass

Founder / President
Camarillo, CA United States

Where is this project located?