Rebuild Flooded Burma Refugee Camp Recovery Centre

 
$12,716
$8,656
Raised
Remaining
Aug 14, 2012

10 Months Since the Flooding...What Have We Done?

Umpiem Replacing the Roof
Umpiem Replacing the Roof

Dear Friends

Hard to believe it has only been 10 months since the flooding in Thailand devastated the Burmese Refugee Camps on the Thai/Burma Border.  Since that time, thanks to all of you we have raised $12,900 dollars of the $20,000 we projected we would need to recover our DARE Centres in 5 camps.

Three of the DARE Centers have been completely rebuilt by the refugee DARE workers.  These also, have been re-supplied with items needed for treating the refugees who come to DARE Network to recover from their addictions and for activities for the young people in the camps to prevent future addiction.

The other two DARE Centers are nearly completed.  We are attaching some photos for you to see the progress of the work in Nu Poe and Umpiem Mai camps.  Umpiem camp was also hit by a big fire this year.  DARE lost the roof of the building.  Fortunately no one was hurt from DARE and we were going to take the roof off anyway, as it was already damaged by the bad weather.

We are still in need of funding for the interior of the buildings in Nu Poe and Umpiem, which includes sleeping mats, mosquito nets, white boards for training, kitchen supplies, stoves and pots for cooking for the clients and paper materials for treatment and training, sports equipment for the young people, art supplies and musical instruments.  We also need a few additional items to finish off the buildings themselves.

The situation in the camps have become more difficult as Burma opens up.  Life may be better in the cities in Burma and the big donors are lining up to get in there, but they are neglecting the camps as a results.  Rations have been cut causing more hunger, poverty creating further social problems including addiction.  We at DARE are needed now more than ever.  Until people can return home safely, they are stuck in the camps depressed and desperate.

Fortunately, our workers are doing their best to alleviate the suffering and learning how to support each other.

Thanks to all of you for your support.  Feel free to continue. Or consider making a recurrent donation.  It will go a long way and you can rest assured that every cent that comes to us from GlobalGiving goes directly to the refugees.

Pam

DARE Network

Working on the floor
Working on the floor
Painting to prevent insect destruction
Painting to prevent insect destruction
Umpiem Mai DARE Centre
Umpiem Mai DARE Centre
DARE Staff in front of building
DARE Staff in front of building
High balance
High balance
May 17, 2012

Postcard: Project Site Visit

The refugee camp
The refugee camp

Jacqueline Lee is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving who is visiting our partners’ projects throughout Southeast Asia. Her “Postcard” from the visit in Thailand:

Imagine being stuck in 1 place for your entire life – one community with the only way in or out controlled by authorities of another land. Imagine having no access to income generating activities outside of this compound. Imagine not having a country or state to claim and call home – from yours, you fled for your life and from violence. This is the situation of the refugees I met near Mae Sariang, Thailand.  On May 4, 2012 I visited the work of D.A.R.E. Network, which supports these communities with Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation and Education, and experienced the impact it has along with the facilities GlobalGiving supporters helped rebuild after the floods.

I met with staff of the DARE Network in Mae Sariang and after a wonderful tour of the office by Lawlaysay, Kiri and Det Sot took me to one of the refugee camps they work in – a Karen group camp to be specific. The Karen group is an ethnic group found throughout Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, and other areas. This trek to the camp was a rough 2 hours through the mountains – a dangerous tarek during the rainy season, Det Sot told me. 

Along with the direct therapy and prevention work that DARE does, its staff also coordinates with other active NGO’s in the camps to ensure they were all meeting the needs of these communities that have little to no access outside of the camps unless emigrated to the “Third Countries” as they call them – the U.S., Canada, or Australia. I asked why is supporting the youth important, and the staff said because the youth are stuck in the camp and can get trapped using drugs and alcohol. DARE protects the youth and provides alternative activities like their “ultimate Frisbee tournaments”, holding educational groups before activities like ultimate Frisbee can begin. I asked what other types of activities the villagers and youth have access to, and the staff said none.

Immediately upon entering the camp, you could see remnants of the flood’s impact on the community, but the strength of the inhabitants. Their homes were washed away and bridges were destroyed. After, the refugees returned from higher ground, rebuilt homes, fixed bridges and carried on.  The center had just finished its round of therapy and was on break until the next round of therapy began – along with the youth program since they were on holiday.

After, I met with the head of "Social Welfare" in the camp that explained there were about 18,000 refugees in the one camp alone. His role was to deal with fighting within the camp along with social conflict. He said although alcohol was not allowed, people still found ways to get it into the camp. He also explained he is volunteering at DARE. Why was it important to him? He said because at first there was pushback from users in the community, but now the users after receiving therapy receive jobs and are hired providing outlets to alcohol and drug use, not to mention income for their families. He went on to explain that now there were only 11 workers serving this large camp. He hoped there would be more DARE workers to make the camp “more strong”.  There is a saying there that “when using the bottle, you go straight to heaven” – demonstrating the importance of DARE’s presence within the camp along with its educational, awareness, and prevention work along with treatement.

 In addition to its facilities,  Lawlaysay explained to me the goal is to translate its process in a "training" manual that is the accumulation of over 12 years of work. DARE hopes to help people not only in the camps but also inside Burma and even in Karen/Burmese communities in the countries where the refugees have resettled, particularly the USA.

Meeting with staff at the DARE center
Meeting with staff at the DARE center
studying the DARE methodology
studying the DARE methodology
rest of the community supported by DARE
rest of the community supported by DARE

Links:

Mar 12, 2012

Let the Rebuilding Begin!

The material for the new DARE Center arrived!
The material for the new DARE Center arrived!

You are making it possible. Thanks to your contributions during the Holiday Tribute Campaign we have made incredible progress in restoring our DARE Network Recovery Centres. 

Please see the photos of the work in Nu Poe and Mae La Camps.  Work in Umpiem Mai camp will begin soon, after the clean up from the recent fire.  Floods and Fires!  It’s been a difficult year, but we continue our addiction prevention education and treatment program regardless.  As you can see from the photos, everyone at DARE has pitched into to do the work.

 Even though the flood has receded and our rebuilding is in progress, and thanks to you, we have raised over half of what we need; we still need to keep going until everyone has a safe secure place to work.  

Wednesday, March 14th is GlobalGiving’s first BONUS DAY of the year.  From 12:01 am to 11:59 Eastern Standard time, GlobalGiving will match donations with an additional 30%.  If you want to help us reach our goal, this is a great day to give because a little more will go a lot further.

 Please consider a further gift on BONUS DAY, March 14th. and help us finish the job.

Wooden poles and bricks create the new DARE Center
Wooden poles and bricks create the new DARE Center
Its hard work! Weaving bamboo together.
Its hard work! Weaving bamboo together.
The construction
The construction's ready for the new tin roof
This construction will last for many years!
This construction will last for many years!
New treatment material arrived at the DARE Office.
New treatment material arrived at the DARE Office.

Links:

Jan 12, 2012

YOU DID IT!

Peace Art from Burmese Refugee DARE Centre
Peace Art from Burmese Refugee DARE Centre

Happy New Year

From all of us at DARE Network, we want to personally thank you for your contributions to the Tribute Challenge for our project to rebuild our DARE Recovery Centres.

The results are in.  We secured 2nd place out of 1750 projects, thanks to you.  This means that we received $500. in bonus funds from GlobalGiving.  During the 5 week campaign, we raised over $5000.  In recognition of our hard work and all the donors who contributed, GlobalGiving matched that $5000. with another $5000.  This grant was from a small foundation that wanted to give to an organization in good standing on GlobalGiving and that was working on disaster relief.  GlobalGiving chose our project Rebuild Flooded Burma Refugee Recovery Centres for this grant.

We are thrilled and are now able to build two more centres as a result of the Tribute Card Challenge.

The project funding is over halfway to its goal.  We are hopeful that over the coming year others will continue to contribute to the project and we can make safe Recovery Centres for all of our refugee workers, clients, youth teams, womens’ and mens’ anti-violence groups and anyone who visits us.

In addition, our standing on GlobalGiving is nearly at the Superstar level.  Only $1000. to go and we will be in a position to receive greater benefits on the GlobalGiving site.  See the attached link.

Thank you once again for all that you have done and your friendship to us.  Your donation will build infrastructure but your support will build hope.

 

All best,

 

Pam

Project Leader

DARE Network

Thai/Burma Border

Links:

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Funded

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.

Still want to help?
Support another project run by DARE Network (Drug and Alcohol Recovery and Education Network) that needs your help, such as:

Project Leader

Pam Rogers

Mae Sariang, Mae Hong Son Thailand

Where is this project located?

Map of Rebuild Flooded Burma Refugee Camp Recovery Centre