Equip Rangers to Protect Endangered Wildlife

 
$9,930
$20,070
Raised
Remaining
Degraded landscape
Degraded landscape

Desertification is one of the biggest environmental challenges we face, and yet most people do not fully understand it. In order to bring attention to this critical issue, the United Nations General Assembly declared June 17 the World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought. Desertification does not actually refer to the spread of current deserts, but rather the irreversible degradation of soil through human activities such as deforestation, unsustainable farming, mining and overgrazing. It occurs when trees and root systems that bind the soil are removed causing topsoil erosion, and when unsustainable farming practices severely deplete nutrients. The result is an infertile mix of dust and sand that transforms fragile ecosystems into barren deserts while displacing the communities that depend on the land.

Since 2001, Wildlife Alliance has preserved 1.7 million acres of forestland and planted over 730,000 trees. Through advocacy, reforestation and law enforcement, we work tirelessly to preserve remaining forest cover and reconnect the canopy in the Southern Cardamom Mountains for the people and animals that depend on it. Our Community Agriculture Development Project incorporates sustainable farming practices into its land management strategy to empower local people to earn an income that does not depend on stripping the forest of its resources. Through forest protection and sustainable land management, we are working with local communities to not only prevent desertification, but also alleviate poverty and prevent food and water shortages.

Thank you for your continued support, we hope you'll join us in celebrating World Day to Combat Desertification by making a gift to the rangers that work dilegently to protect the Southern Cardamom Forest from illegal logging.

Illegally clearned forest
Illegally clearned forest
Southern Cardamoms- 2M Acres our Rangers Protect
Southern Cardamoms- 2M Acres our Rangers Protect
Rangers with Confiscated Rosewood
Rangers with Confiscated Rosewood

At the end of last year, Wildlife Alliance’s forest patrol unit confiscated 12.5 cubic meters of illegal rosewood – the largest bust of the year! After receiving information from a local informant, the rangers hid along a dirt road for six hours waiting to intercept the illegal wood while in transit. At 3 am, the rangers finally heard engines approaching and jumped on their motorbikes to stop the shipment. As soon as they saw the two large trucks slowly trudging along, four rangers quickly opened the vehicle doors and took control of the trucks. The drivers were handcuffed and the roads were blocked to prevent them from escaping.

Taking the two trucks back to the station was no easy task: after negotiating the dirt roads in the dark, the trucks had to cross several wooden bridges spanning raging rivers to access the closest patrol station. As they started crossing the first bridge, they heard the bridge breaking under the heavy load! So the decision had to be made to take the trucks to a ranger station more than 90 km further instead.

The convoy arrived at the Wildlife Alliance Sre Ambel station at 9 am where they had to count the logs and fill in the legal documentation. 12.5 cubic meters of rosewood were recorded and it was determined that the Chief of the Military Police of Kompong Speu province was the owner of this illegal shipment. This was not going to be an easy case, and just minutes after the Forestry Administration officer leading the operation informed the local Forestry office, the court ordered the officer to bring the two trucks immediately to the court. This had never happened before – as evidence is always kept at the patrol stations under the jurisdiction of the Forestry Administration – but the law authorizes judges to make this kind of decision. We are now following up with the case to ensure that the Chief Military Police is not granted impunity and that the rosewood and trucks are not returned to him in secret.

Rosewood is an especially complicated matter because a lot of money is at stake. It is estimated that 1 cubic meter of rosewood sells for upwards of $50,000 in China and Vietnam. Forest crime uses a sophisticated network that preys on poverty stricken nations and people. Throughout the developing world, it is necessary to take precautions against corruption and information leaks, and doing so often puts the teams dangerously at odds with other officials. However, these vigilant wildlife heroes remain unfaltering. In 2014, the teams confiscated 192 cubic meters of illegal timber and 18 cubic meters of rosewood, removed 22,835 snares and 4,835 meters of netting from the forest, stopped 58 forest firest and rescued 543 animals. Thank you for your support, their important work would not be possible without your continued commitment!

Confiscated wood at the ranger station
Confiscated wood at the ranger station
Help protect the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range!
Help protect the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range!
Leopard cat kitten safe after rescue
Leopard cat kitten safe after rescue

Last month, the Trapeang Rung Patrol Unit received information from an informant about the trafficking of a leopard cat kitten. The traders were seen leaving Koh Kong Town in a Toyota Camry with the kitten and were heading towards Phnom Penh. The rangers left immediately to intercept the vehicle at a nearby checkpoint on Highway 48. After several cars were cleared, the Camry finally pulled up and a thorough search of the vehicle was conducted. Unfortunately, no wildlife was found and the suspect was free to go. Realizing the trader must have disposed of the kitten when he saw the rangers at the checkpoint, the team decided to spread out and search for the animal. After several hours, the rangers found the poor kitten, trapped in a box and hidden in the forest near the main road. The next day, the kitten was transferred to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Station near Chi Phat to be cared for and rehabilitated for possible future release.

Leopard cats are frequently traded for their fur, meat and as pets. While the suspect in this case could not be arrested, if it were not for the intervention of the Forest Protection team, this kitten would have suffered an unconscionable fate. So far this year, the rangers have rescued 388 animals and removed about 17,000 animal traps from the forest. Their ability to utilize an effective informant network, conduct vehicle checkpoints and patrol the forest for criminal activity has made the Southern Cardamom Mountains one of the best-protected rainforests in Southeast Asia. However, protecting 2 million acres of forest in a developing country like Cambodia, where funds towards environmental protection are limited, can be extremely challenging. Our ability to strengthen frontline protection, provide rangers with specialized training and drive down forest crime would not be possible without your support.

Help our Forest Protection Program continue to rescue animals and protect the Southern Cardamoms by making a gift to forest protection today!

Rangers find bucket in the forest along the road
Rangers find bucket in the forest along the road
Inside the bucket they found the little kitten
Inside the bucket they found the little kitten
Sun bear cub found in blue box
Sun bear cub found in blue box

On October 20, 2014, the Tatai Patrol Station in the Southern Cardamoms received a phone call from an informant about a sun bear cub that was being held captive in an area 70 km north of Koh Kong Town. The team left immediately to rescue the bear and called upon the Koh Pao Patrol unit for assistance. When the rangers arrived, they surrounded the house and asked the owner for permission to check the property. The owner agreed, and a full search was conducted, but no bear was found. The rangers decided to search a nearby hut, where they located a blue container. Inside the blue container was a tiny bear cub, no more than 6 months old! Unfortunately, the owner of the hut was nowhere to be found, and neighbors informed the rangers that he only visited the property occasionally. The rangers will continue to investigate the matter in order to identify and arrest the hunter. The bear was taken back to the station, and was transferred the next day to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center for care.

Sun bears and other Asian bear species are being brutally targeted by poachers in Cambodia for their body parts which are used in traditional medicine. Because of this active trade in bears and bear parts, their populations - especially in Southeast Asia - have been decimated. The demand for bear parts on the international black market is high and poachers and traffickers can fetch a high price for paws, bile, and gallbladders. Adult bears are poached for their paws - considered a delicacy in soup. Cubs are torn from their mothers and sold into the pet trade. When they get bigger they end up imprisoned in tiny cages or sold to bile farms in Vietnam. Bear "farms" keep the bears caged and alive, while their gall bladder and bile is harvested and sold as traditional medicine.

Help our Forest Protection Program put an end to bear trafficking and continue to rescue animals by making a gift today!

Rangers searching hut, where they noticed the bin
Rangers searching hut, where they noticed the bin
Tatai station with rescued cub
Tatai station with rescued cub
The Pangolin is Listed as Critically Endangered
The Pangolin is Listed as Critically Endangered

Save a Pangolin this Bonus Day! The Sunda pangolin is a scaly mammal that eats ants and termites, hides in dense forest, and rolls into a tiny ball when scared. However, this secretive and solitary animal is also the most illegally traded mammal in the world. Hunted for their meat and scales, more than one million individuals are believed to have been trafficked in the past decade. In China and Vietnam, their meat is considered a delicacy and is sold for $350 per kg; their scales are used in traditional medicine, and can be worth up to $1,000 per kg. To tackle this escalating crisis, our rangers are working day and night, removing nets and rescuing animals. Last year alone, they removed 15,400 snares and nets, and resued 448 animals. These rangers are on the frontlines of conservation, and $3,500 will help them conduct vehicle checkpoints, remove pangolin traps, stop poachers and prevent this shy and gentle spcies from disappearing forever.

Make your gift go even further and join us on October 15th to help save this incredible animal from going extinct! Visit our micro-project Help Save the Most Trafficked Mammal in the World to see more pictures and learn more about this incredible animal!

October 15th is the final Bonus Day of the year on GlobalGiving - All donations up to $1,000 are being matched 30%!

These shy notcturnal animals have no teeth
These shy notcturnal animals have no teeth
And curl up into a ball when frightened
And curl up into a ball when frightened
Pangolins rescued from a trader
Pangolins rescued from a trader

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Project Leader

Chloe Lala-Katz

Communications and Finance Field Liaison
New York, NY United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Equip Rangers to Protect Endangered Wildlife