Equip Rangers to Protect Endangered Wildlife

 
$7,496
$22,505
Raised
Remaining
Oct 15, 2014

Help Save the Most Trafficked Mammal in the World

The Pangolin is Listed as Critically Endangered
The Pangolin is Listed as Critically Endangered

Save a Pangolin this Bonus Day! The Sunda pangolin is a scaly mammal that eats ants and termites, hides in dense forest, and rolls into a tiny ball when scared. However, this secretive and solitary animal is also the most illegally traded mammal in the world. Hunted for their meat and scales, more than one million individuals are believed to have been trafficked in the past decade. In China and Vietnam, their meat is considered a delicacy and is sold for $350 per kg; their scales are used in traditional medicine, and can be worth up to $1,000 per kg. To tackle this escalating crisis, our rangers are working day and night, removing nets and rescuing animals. Last year alone, they removed 15,400 snares and nets, and resued 448 animals. These rangers are on the frontlines of conservation, and $3,500 will help them conduct vehicle checkpoints, remove pangolin traps, stop poachers and prevent this shy and gentle spcies from disappearing forever.

Make your gift go even further and join us on October 15th to help save this incredible animal from going extinct! Visit our micro-project Help Save the Most Trafficked Mammal in the World to see more pictures and learn more about this incredible animal!

October 15th is the final Bonus Day of the year on GlobalGiving - All donations up to $1,000 are being matched 30%!

These shy notcturnal animals have no teeth
These shy notcturnal animals have no teeth
And curl up into a ball when frightened
And curl up into a ball when frightened
Pangolins rescued from a trader
Pangolins rescued from a trader

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Jul 18, 2014

Rangers Rescue Critically Endangered Crocodile

Siamese crocodile found tied to a tree
Siamese crocodile found tied to a tree

On June 5, 2014, the Sre Ambel patrol unit rescued a baby Siamese crocodile from a wildlife poacher in Sre Ambel village. Listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, the animal's health is currently being assessed, after which it will be released into protected habitat in the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range. Extinct from 99% of its original habitat, there are only around 250 Siamese crocodiles left in the wild and most make their home in the Southern Cardamoms. They are threatened by habitat destruction and are hunted extensively for their skin. The luxury market’s demand for crocodile-leather products has had devastating effects on crocodile populations all over the world. Bags and briefcases made from these endangered animals sell for thousands of dollars, making the crocodile business very lucrative for poachers and crocodile farmers. Wild caught animals are often sold into farms where they are hybridized with saltwater crocodiles, further damaging the survival prospects of the species.

The Siamese crocodile can grow to a length of 13 feet, and primarily feeds on fish but is also known to catch reptiles, amphibians, and small mammals. It reaches maturity at about 15 years, and has a lifespan of over 50 years. Once thought to be locally extinct, a small population was found concentrated in the Southwestern region of the Cardamom Mountains. Since 2002, Wildlife Alliance’s Southern Cardamom Forest Protection Program has been defending this crucial region from illegal logging, poaching, and forest fires. Help our forest rangers continue to stop wildlife crime and protect this critically endangered species from going extinct, by making a gift today!

Rangers rescuing the rare Siamese Crocodile baby.
Rangers rescuing the rare Siamese Crocodile baby.
May 20, 2014

22 Logs of Luxury Timber Seized

22 Logs of Illegal Timber Confiscated
22 Logs of Illegal Timber Confiscated

 On April 10, 2014, an undercover operation conducted by Wildlife Alliance’s forest patrol unit led to the confiscation of 22 logs of luxury timber. For three days, the Assistant Supervisor of Sre Ambel Station posed as a timber trader to gain insider information on an upcoming shipment of illegal timber. While following an intermediary trader, he discovered the stash of illegal timber ready to be transported. He immediately called the Station Supervisor, and the patrol team arrived late at night, just as the drivers began to haul the timber away. The offenders did everything they could to prevent the patrol team from confiscating the illegal timber. To intimidate the officers, the traders opened fire at the patrol unit, and a shoot-out ensued in the darkness. However, the team persevered and was able to confiscate the two trucks containing the illegal wood and drove the evidence back to the station. The team pursued the traders but was unable to catch them as they were heavily armed and able to slip into the forest cover.

The Southern Cardamom Forest Protection Program forest rangers work day and night, risking their lives to protect the forest. Last year alone, the rangers removed 13,474 snares, confiscated 8,369 cubic feet of illegal timber and rescued 448 animals. Right now, the team is in urgent need of a new vehicle in order to continue their operations. The truck, which would cost $30,000, would allow them to continue to patrol over the 1.7 million acres of forest in the Southern Cardamoms. Help these rangers continue to protect the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range and its wildlife!

Last year rangers confiscated 8,369 ft3 of timber
Last year rangers confiscated 8,369 ft3 of timber
Mar 19, 2014

Rangers Discover Over 12 Tons of Illegal Timber

Confiscated boat with Timber
Confiscated boat with Timber

Recently, the Tatai Ranger station received information about a boat heading towards the coast carrying illegal wood. According to the informant, the boat that was transporting the illegal wood was stuck in an estuary near Botum Sakor National Park due to low tide. Project Manager Eduard Lefter and the Tatai ranger team immediately headed towards the area by speedboat; as they headed south, they called the Trapeang Roung Station for backup.

An hour later, when the team finally found the boat, it was nearly empty. In fact, the informant had called them too early and the perpetrators had barely started loading the boat. As the rangers approached the area, the offenders ran away and took cover in the forest. The team found a large boat with four cubic meters (141 cubic feet) of wood, and two smaller boats ready to be loaded. There was also an astonishing 35-40 cubic meters (1,236 – 1,412 cubic feet) of timber hidden in the river, about 200-300 meters (656-986 feet) deep. After 3 hours of loading up the boats, the team transported the timber and boats back to the station, destroying what they had to leave behind.

Wildlife Alliance’s forest rangers risk their lives every day to patrol over 1.7 million acres of forest in the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range. Last year alone, the Forest Protection team conducted 7,099 patrols, confiscated over 237.7 cubic meters of illegal rosewood and timber and rescued 448 animals. Help them continue to make an impact by making a gift today!

Timber confiscations
Timber confiscations
Dec 20, 2013

Wildlife Poacher Caught Shooting a Gibbon

Confiscating the Gibbon
Confiscating the Gibbon

Early in the morning on November 6th, 2013, forest rangers from the Koh Pao station were on patrol when they heard the distinctive sounds of gunshots being fired. The team immediately took action and drove aggressively toward the area of the forest where the shots originated. Upon arrival, the team discovered three gunmen fleeing the scene with a dead gibbon. In hot pursuit, they chased after the offenders. Two gunmen escaped into the dense forest, however the offender in possession of the dead gibbon was arrested and immediately taken to the station for questioning. Later that morning he was transferred to the local court, where he was charged with illegal wildlife trafficking and will be facing maximum sentencing for the killing of an endangered species.

With approximately only 35,000 individuals left in the wild, gibbon populations are on sharp decline due to hunting and habitat fragmentation. They are famous for the incredible calls that resonate through the forest. They vocalize in defense of their territory; however hunters often use these calls to pinpoint their location and capture them. This is the first dead gibbon the team has confiscated in years, and they were very lucky to catch the hunter in action.

Help our forest rangers stop wildlife crime in the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range by making a gift today!

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Project Leader

Chloe Lala-Katz

Communications and Finance Field Liaison
New York, NY United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Equip Rangers to Protect Endangered Wildlife