The Child Brides: Send Them to School instead

 
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Oct 18, 2011

How rural girl Leela became a girls' leader

Leela, 15, part-time enrolled, rural Rajasthan
Leela, 15, part-time enrolled, rural Rajasthan

On October 19th, it is GlobalGiving's LAST Bonus Day of the year! Starting at 12:01 am EDT, GlobalGiving will be matching all donations (up to $1,000 per donor, per project) at 30%. GlobalGiving has $100,000 available in matching funds. Don't miss a special opportunity to make a small donation with a big impact! 

Lately, we posted the story of Timi, a 13-year old girl from the tribal belt in Rajasthan. The fact that Timi is a farmer's only child and a girl reduces the chance that her parents will ever let her go to school, because who would then tend the goats? And who would do all the hard work young girls in rural India are often condemned to? Nevertheless, our field workers keep on visiting her home regularly and try convincing her father to enroll his girl at least part-time, a deal that can often be agreed on.

This was the case with Leela, a 15-year old girl, now part-time enrolled to a public school in Bali tribal belt, Rajasthan. Her parents finally agreed on sending her to school half a day, so she could still manage to do her duties.

In the morning, she studies Hindi, English and Maths. Very eager to learn, she has made great progress and grown a confident young lady. Leela was recently elected as one of the school’s Bal Sabhas members. As a girl’s leader she participates in life skills activites and motivates other girls to learn.

Back home in the afternoon, she helps her sisters with the rural girl’s everyday duties: fetching water and collecting fire wood for the evening meal. Finally having time for homework, Leela teaches her younger sisters what she has learned at school.

There are still more than 5000 girls out there in rural Rajasthan with the potential of Leela. Normally, a donation of 30$ will send 10 girls to school, providing them with a basic education and turning them into an active part of society. On October 19th however – with a little luck and fingers crossed – GlobalGiving will multiply the impact of your donation.

Thanks again for your support.

 

 

 

 

 

A happy girl packs her schoolbag
A happy girl packs her schoolbag
She
She's made great progress in Hindi reading & Math
She has many friends now and loves to go to school
She has many friends now and loves to go to school
After school she helps her sisters with the chores
After school she helps her sisters with the chores
She can teach her sisters what she has learned
She can teach her sisters what she has learned

Links:

Oct 12, 2011

Spending a day with rural girl Timi

Timi, 13, never enrolled, possible child bride
Timi, 13, never enrolled, possible child bride

Here's a sneak-peak into life of one of the many farmers' girls from the tribal belt in Rajasthan. Timi is an only child, her father suffers from a handicapped foot and is unable to work. Her mother leaves the village every day for a small town nearby where she carries out general level work to procure the family’s miniscule daily wages.

2 Educate Girls interns recently spent a day with Timi at her home to learn more about the daily life of a non-school going girl in rural India. They watched her carry out her duties from the cleaning of the family home and preparation of rotis before sunrise to the feeding and milking of the family’s goats, collection of water and firewood, preparation of the family dinner and another cleanup of the home before taking rest.

Particularly unsettling was a moment when Timi, on the farm tending to the goats, witnessed a band of girls walking together in uniform to the local school.

When asked, Timi described her feeling toward her current situation as “confused and torn” – she feels a very strong sense of duty to her mother and father but would also love to be at school with the other children her age. Without and education she voiced that she sees a future of early marriage, children and the same repetitive daily duties that she undertakes today.

Educate Girls recognizes the enormity of work of, in particular, farming families and how valuable a resource the children are on the farms. Many individual cases have been negotiated between Educate Girls and the out-of-school-girl families, in which girls may attend a half-day at school so that house and farm work does not suffer. On this particular day, Timi’s father approached Educate Girls to discuss the prospect of re-enrolling Timi in school.

 

Looking after the family
Looking after the family's most valuable asset
Witnessing other girls on their way to school
Witnessing other girls on their way to school
Collecting firewood is one of Timi
Collecting firewood is one of Timi's daily duties
Timi eats her lunch in solitude, with the goats
Timi eats her lunch in solitude, with the goats
Milking the few goats in the herd that aren
Milking the few goats in the herd that aren't dry
Preparing the sabjee for the family
Preparing the sabjee for the family's dinner
Cleaning up after dinner before she can take rest
Cleaning up after dinner before she can take rest

Links:

Oct 3, 2011

Becoming a School Girl instead of a Child Bride

Every 5th girl in rural Rajasthan is married at the age of 15. Ponri was not only lucky, she was determined not to end as a child bride, but to fight for an education. Her story is an impressive journey of how to become a role model for girls.

58 million young women in developing countries – 1 in 3 – have been married before the age of 18 in the last decade, many against their will and in violation of the law. This is the sad reality underlined by the latest figures from thePopulation Reference Bureau. In Rajasthan, 1 in 5 young women who are now ages 20 to 24 say they had been married by their 15th birthday. With limited education and economic opportunities, child brides are not only condemned to a life of poverty, but one of social isolation, and powerlessness, infringing on their human rights, health, and well-being.

Ponri is one of the many young women who would have normally envisaged a lonely life as a pre-adult bride. She is the youngest of 8 children. Her 4 brothers and 3 sisters have never seen a school from the inside, so the last thing her father had planned for her was a school career; economical resources were limited and he felt that his youngest daughter was required to help at home until she reached the age to serve at her prospective husband's house. But Ponri had other plans. She was determined to go to school. Realizing that there was no chance, her father would ever let her go to school, at 13, Ponri ran away from home twice, hoping to find a hideout at one of the Shiksha Mitra Kendra’s. “If I wouldn’t have run away, I would be married by now, tending goats out in the nowhere”, she says. This is when Ranaram, an Educate Girls Field Coordinator took up on Ponri. He visited her family over and over again.

Eventually, her father could no longer take the continuous visits and agreed to let her go to school. “Thanks to Ranaram’s persistence, I could make my ambition turn into reality” says Ponri, and with a shy smile on her face she admits: “Even if I went through tough times, I know now, that it is worth fighting. I want to be a teacher to encourage other girls to fight for their education”

Due to her strong will and after a myriad of visits from the Ranaram, Ponri's father finally agreed for the sake of his peace and quiet. Being the first father to send his girl to school, he had initially been afraid of what the community would say. But now, as his daughter is doing so well, he admits that he too feels proud of her.

Ponri's father admits: “I feel a little proud in the community, people look up to me now. I also appreciate the health and hygiene tips my daughter provides me.”

The ambitious girl has managed to catch up with the other 5th grade students in only 2 years. Today she leads the Bal Sabha group as “Bal Panch” and motivates other girls to fight for their own education. 

Help us to reach out for more girls like Ponri! 

Links:

Sep 24, 2011

FEGG is Educate Girls now.

Educate Girls | Home
Educate Girls | Home

Dear Friends,

We have done it! Eventually the moment has arrived to tell you about some great news: Foundation to Educate Girls Globally is now simply Educate Girls. We are proud to introduce our brand new website Educategirls.in to you!

Receive our updates outside the GlobalGiving community and sign up for our newsletter, read what we're up to on our newsblog and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

If you like our work, please do get involved and spread the word! Thank you again for your trust and support that we highly appreciate.

Warmest regards,
Safeena

Educate Girls | Who we are
Educate Girls | Who we are
Educate Girls | Our Impact
Educate Girls | Our Impact
Educate Girls | Get involved
Educate Girls | Get involved

Links:

Jun 24, 2011

The stunning impact of CLT on the quality of education

Educate Girls
Educate Girls' first award!

We would like to share our latest program results with you. “Creative Learning and Teaching“ (CLT) techniques have proven crucial to improving quality of education, and we are very proud that the results display such a great impact.

The introduction of child-centric CLT techniques into the teaching process is one of our essential program features that improve learning levels and outcomes. The techniques focus on activity-based and playful learning: children learn more efficiently if they enjoy the process. The accelerated “Catch Up” methodology ensures that children who are lagging behind in the classroom can be taught successfully to catch up with the rest of the class.

In the past months we…

…trained 35 District Institute for Education and Training (DIET) members and 854 teachers in the Pali district of Rajasthan.

…administered pre and post tests all schools in order to track the impact of the CLT module on learning levels. More than 28,000 children from 3rd, 4th and 5th grades attended the pretests in Math, Hindi and English reading. This corresponds to over 70% of enrolled students, where as our post tests were attended by 79% of all enrolled students.

…trained 140 village-based education volunteers, or “Shiksha Preraks,” that provided direct hand holding support to schools with poor pretest scores.

… supported an additional 300 schools with hands-on classroom support. To further support and motivate the teachers, our regional office made over 750+ phone calls. We sent out over 40,000 SMS to update, inform and involve the teaching community.

 After intense months of training and hand holding teachers, giving pre and post tests, the results of improved learning levels and outcomes are as follows:

– Hindi: The number who can read a story went from 15% to 35%

– English: The number who can read a sentence or more went up from 9% to 29%

– Math: The number who can complete 2 digit multiplication and division went from 11% to 29%

 

Along with boosting learning levels for all children, we also found that CLT helps girls catch up to boys – a crucial result, especially in 5th grade, where girls are most at risk of dropping out of school. Please download the full report at: http://www.educategirls.in/clt_results.pdf

We are very proud to present these amazing results that have been analyzed internally and also by research associates at the Centre for Advanced Studies of

India (CASI), University of Pennsylvania:

 "Students in Educate Girls program schools are almost 13% more likely to score in the upper achievement levels in Hindi and 14% more likely to score in the upper achievement levels in Math than students in non-program schools. Improvement occurs among both boys and girls in the program schools."

– Devesh Kapur, Director of the Center for the Advanced Study of India and Randall Akee, PhD Harvard University, Assist. Professor Tufts University, USA

Educate Girls also announced the winners of the “Best CLT Teacher Awards” at an Educate Girls function today in Pali. The Educate Girls trophies went to the best performing teachers, who recorded the biggest learning gains in Math, Hindi and English reading. We are very excited about these developments and are also gearing up for scaling CLT further to cover almost 1700+ schools this year!

We are very grateful to have you in our support network; it is our combined efforts that lead to real change for the rural and tribal children with which we work.

 

Sincerely,

Safeena Husain

CEO Foundation to Educate Girls Globally

One of the "best teachers" is awarded...
One of the "best teachers" is awarded...

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Organization

Educate Girls

Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
http://www.educategirls.in

Project Leader

Safeena Husain

Executive Director
Mumbai, MH India

Where is this project located?

Map of The Child Brides: Send Them to School instead