Planting 15000 trees in Madagascar

 
$17,163
$27,837
Raised
Remaining
Reforestation worked wonders in the school yard
Reforestation worked wonders in the school yard

Madagascar has experienced an exceptionally devastating cyclone season in early 2015. The severe weather and rain caused a lot of damage and made roads impassable and unsafe. We sent our founder’s nephew, a strong young man, who had to walk the last 20 kilometers on foot to reach our villages.

Dr. Ihanta, Zahana’s founder, sent us this explanatory background note: “The weather was terrible and most of people were forced to stay in their houses most of the time. In our capital many houses collapsed due to the rain and mudslides on the steep hillsides. Unbelievable, but since January it was raining everyday.  We learnt that the last timr we had a similar flood in Madagascar was in 1959 and it was also very serious."

When her nephew checked on the reforestation progress he filed this report (short and concise as usual):

Fiarenana: Planting trees became an habit in the village. The latest numbers to report are:

  • Orange trees 57
  • Papaya 13
  • Local fruit trees 43
  • Eucalyptus 4,494

Fiadanana: International Woman Day: Activity was planting trees. Accounting for recently planted trees:

  • Eucalyptus 2,300
  • Mangos 250
  • Natalys trees 30 [a big shade three with small little leaves]
  • Fruit trees 74
The schoolyard in Fiarenana in a panorama shot
The schoolyard in Fiarenana in a panorama shot
Santa
Santa's message to you

Happy New Year!

We got these great photos with the Christmas trees in our schools in Fiarenana and Fiadanana. We have so many beautiful pictures, it is hard to choose just six. We let them speak for themselves.

Since 2007 Santa has been visiting our schools in rural Madagascar. This year he brought gifts with him of cookies, sweets, bread and clothes. About half of the lucky ones also got a doll or a toy car. And yes, Santa is impressive. He is probably the tallest Malagasy the children might ever see in their lives.

If you are in a position to decide about your end-of-the-year donation, we hope you will think of our reforestation efforts in Madagascar and donate to Zahana. Thank you!

GlobalGiving offers options with just a few clicks:

Looking for a gift in honor of somebody? Why not consider a gift in her or his name (with an e-card or physical card sent to the lucky recipient by GlobalGiving)

GlobalGiving has an end-of-the-year campaign for 2014. To get one of the cash prizes, Zahana needs to raise at least $1,000 from 30 different donors for our reforestation efforts. You can do this with a few clicks and help us get closer to our additional monies goal.

And to sweeten the pie, if you set up a recurring donation to Zahana, the amount of your December donation will be doubled by GlobalGiving (up to $200), making your gift twice as big.

Or you may just click on the button “give now” below.

Thank you!

Christmas tree in Fiadanana school
Christmas tree in Fiadanana school
Santa with gifts
Santa with gifts
Santa in Fiadanana
Santa in Fiadanana
Santa in Fiadanana -look at all the trees!
Santa in Fiadanana -look at all the trees!
Christmas tree in Fiarenana school
Christmas tree in Fiarenana school
A tree planted next to the school
A tree planted next to the school

Sometimes it can be as easy as putting two and two together. Or, in our case putting picture and picture together.

A few weeks back, preparing a presentation about Zahana at the Waldorf high school in Honolulu, we wanted to visually bring accross the impact of our reforestation program and show some new slides, they may not find on our website as well. We had just received the latest pictures from Madagascar via email: A visit to our villages from November 2014. Lucky for us, one of the November 2014 pictures was taken in an angle similar to a picture taken seven years earlier. We showed both pictures in time sequence and, to encourage audience participation, asked: “do you see any difference between the two pictures?” Fortunately, from the perspective of the presenter, one student answered immediately: "the trees!.

Sometimes it is as easy as putting two pictures together. You just may have to wait and let it grow for seven years to do it.

Markus

PS: And yes, as the end of the year nears it is this season again when we and everybody and their sister asks for your tax-deductible donation.If you are in a position to support Zahana again, please consider us for 2014. Thank you!

To sweeten the pie GlobalGiving has end-of-the-year campaign and we participate in it this year. To qualify for one of the cash prizes we need to raise at least $1,000 from 30 different donors. So if you would like to support our reforestation efforts in Madagascar still in 2014 please click on the "give now" button below. To make it even sweeter (or spice it up is you already had too much sugar), all recurring donations set up and the amount made for December is being matched (up to $200) by GlobalGiving. Recurring donations count for the end-of-the-year campaing.

Thank you very much.

The school in October 2007
The school in October 2007
The school in Nov. 2014
The school in Nov. 2014
Master gardener Jean in Fiarenana
Master gardener Jean in Fiarenana

Dear friends,

Our two gardeners are community champions in our reforestation efforts. Their work positively impacts all of our activities in our villages. We had written the project report below with a special focus of the gardeners’ impact on our microcredit project, but since their activities are also vital for the reforestation project we wanted to share this overview with you.

The invitation by GlobalGiving to post fail forward stories was an interesting challenge for us. It gave us a chance to look at our work from an outside perspective, and at the same time provides us with a venue to write a thought piece or a critical reflection that does not focus directly on achievements or goals like other project reports.

2007 was a great year for Zahana. First of all, we raised the funds needed to launch our project. Rooted in our participatory development approach, we successfully built a clean water system (still running today in its 8th year) and, once again together with the community, their school. (This is explained in more detail on our website). Because of this success we had a very good standing in the community, as we had built the trust that our joint projects deliver what we set out to accomplish.

We were ready to tackle the third priority of the development goals the community set: crop improvement.

Based on our philosophy that local problems require local solutions, we hired an agricultural expert who lived in the community nearby. As it so happened, he was the father of one of our teachers, which assured us that he knew the people, social networks, taboos, climate and agricultural conditions in our rural village. We paid him at the time a fair consultant wage, which was quite a hefty sum (much more than a teacher's monthly salary) and asked him to conduct a hands-on workshop. He showed up on a motorbike, which for the local context is a very impressive status symbol (comparable to a fundraising advisor for a small nonprofit in the US showing up in a Maserati.)

We assembled the women's group and all the interested farmers for a workshop. Our water system had been completed the year before. A water faucet located right next to the school gave easy unlimited access to watering needs. He selected a piece of land right next to the school. It was very flat and had not been farmed before. He recommended growing a variety of crops (see website report), last but not least potatoes as the main new crop. Nobody in the village had planted potatoes before. He assured us that this was the ideal location and that with some judicious watering, a completely new crop could be introduced in the village overnight, one that could be grown outside of the rice growing cycle. The women's group dug up the land (by hand of course) and planted potatoes under his supervision.

To make a long story short: the potato crop was an utter failure. Exposed to the blazing sun on top of the mountain, the newly planted potatoes grew very well in the beginning and later withered away in the heat. Not a single potato was harvested.

The worst unanticipated consequence for us was that we lost all credibility with the community. They equated Zahana with the agricultural expert. It took us quite a while to gain the community's trust again. Not only did we spend a sizable amount of our scarce donations at the time on a local agricultural expert, the much higher price was the community's trust.

Now to the solution. We want to tell the reader in advance: this is a story within stories, but rest assured, we will return to potatoes.

One of the saving graces in this entire fiasco was: one of the farmers ignored to the agricultural experts advice.  He planted his potatoes down by the creek and former water hole next to the shade of a mango tree. His potato harvest was phenomenal. Two years in a row. At the same time it showed that growing a new crop was indeed feasible –with the right conditions. In addition, potatoes are highly sought-after in the market and the bigger village nearby.

In talking with the villagers we found out that the agricultural expert had also overlooked teaching the villagers that you can only eat the tubers in the ground, the actual potatoes, but not the fruit that grows on the green plant looking surprisingly like tomatoes (both nightshades). These are toxic. When potatoes were introduced in Prussia in the 17th century farmers ate the fruits on top by mistake. Rumor has it that quite a few died. King Frederick II of Prussia had to eat potatoes in public to prove to his subjects that humans can indeed eat potatoes. The villagers were amazed when we told them this story. While most likely nobody knows who the King of Prussia was, it had a great impact that a King needed to publically eat eating something to prove that it's edible. But since this fact comes with a story that everybody will re-tell, everybody, not only in our village, will know very soon not to eat the poisonous fruits on top of the potato plant, should they ever plant it. Educational message accomplished, failure to mention a dangerous fact was remedied.

But now to the real solution: In our second village of Fiarenana Jean was a well-trained master gardener. Years back he had been sent for an extensive agricultural training far away from his village. But that project failed because the NGO’s funding ran out and all his expertise went untapped. He approached us with the proposal to hire him. Again, with microcredit in mind, we thought we pay him for the initial 6 to 12 month and after he's established he can sell his seedlings in his village and the neighboring communities and earn a living this way. In addition, we thought that while he was on Zahana’s payroll, he should spend half of his time teaching gardening at our school. Basically a two-for-one deal for us.

Results where phenomenal. He has an incredible green thumb and he provided the community with seedlings and training. With the help of the parents and students, he grew a huge variety of vegetables in the school gardens (photos on our website).

After twelve months came the moment of truth: it was time to cut the ties and let the budding entrepreneur walk on his own. Little did we know that the next failure was lurking. Very politely Jean, our master gardener, explained to us that he was not inclined to go on his own. He felt uncomfortable charging his friends and neighbors for seeds, seedlings and expertise. He explained he’d rather return to rice farming, not his first choice, than working with the insecurity of a self-employed gardener in the community and potentially be faced with no income and starvation. The dilemma: microcredit philosophy requires that projects become sustainable by supporting themselves. We could either lose a brilliant gardener and schoolteacher, or reconsider our own assumptions and continue to employ him. After much deliberation and discussion, we chose the latter. Paying the salary for by now two master gardeners, has become an integral part of our annual microcredit budget. The payoff of this small investment, employing truly local community advisors, has paid back our investment tenfold ever since (just think reforestation).

In 2009 our master gardener Jean approached us with the idea of planting potatoes. Based on the prior fiasco, we thought: “not potatoes again”. But this time it was different. Different, first and foremost because the request came from the community; not for the community from an outside expert advisor. In participatory development requests from the community have priority, or it would not be participatory.

To make this long story short, since it is documented on our website (link): we provided Jean with 100 kg of potatoes. They were bought locally in a market in Madagascar's prime potato growing region. He distributed 2 kilos to every family in the village. Over 2 tons of potatoes were harvested only a few months later, making this a 20-fold return on our investment. But if you want to find out why this story also has a mini failure built-in, since no potatoes were sold for much needed cash, you need to go to our website and read the story in full. Just a hint: with 2 tons of potatoes harvested nobody went hungry during the season that is called ‘époque dure’ or ‘hard times’, with is a nice euphemism for ‘going hungry’. What is fit for Kings, is fit for our villagers anytime.

Best regards,

Markus Faigle

Agricultural Workshop Participants - Women
Agricultural Workshop Participants - Women's Group
Agricultural Expert (with shoes) teaching planting
Agricultural Expert (with shoes) teaching planting
Ignoring expert advice: Growing potatoes successfu
Ignoring expert advice: Growing potatoes successfu
Potato vendor in a market in Madagasscar
Potato vendor in a market in Madagasscar

Links:

Seedling grown by our gardeners
Seedling grown by our gardeners

Our reforestation project is making our gardener Bary’s dream a reality: to live in the sea of green in Fiadanana, surrounded by trees he can leave as a legacy for his children.

Most of the trees planted under the guidance of Zahana's gardeners have been growing well and seem to be strong. By now many are big enough to survive without being watered or tended to. Our team in Madagascar reported to us laughingly, that the best part is the villager’s amazement at themselves. Everybody is really surprised that reforestation works so well, despite the fact that all of them are farmers and work the land every day. In every meeting they mention the astonishing fact that planting new trees is indeed possible. In a rather barren landscape, dotted with few trees, it is one of our proudest and most visible achievements, really showing how participatory development can change the physical landscape. Instead of only cutting down trees as they have in the past (and still do in other places), people are now planting their future firewood. Our team in Madagascar said: “if you have to summarize our project in English the slogan ‘yes we can’ is most fitting”.

On a meta, or a broader political level, Zahana's impact is becoming far-reaching. Attending the inauguration of our health center, a few months ago, the brother of Madagascar's president and his wife visited our villages. Impressed by the clean water system, our schools, but most of all by seeing the planted trees, he keeps on calling our founder Dr. Ihanta on the phone, asking how she and Zahana achieved what we did. Since he has great passion for development work, he is aware that despite good intentions, many development initiatives run out of steam after one, two or three years. He expressed repeatedly that he was most impressed that Zahana is still going strong in its 8th year and seems to be increasing its impact every year. Not only is this a validation for us that our participatory development approach is indeed working, but it also shows that our results speak for themselves, and that two small villages in the middle of the high plateau of Madagascar can have a far-reaching impact.

Last but not least: Our gardeners continue, and always will, growing tree seedlings. Seedlings are distributed for free to support community and individual reforestation efforts. After all, this an ongoing, truly renewable program.

Community reforestation celebration
Community reforestation celebration
One day there will be a tree covered schoolyard
One day there will be a tree covered schoolyard
Bananas (not a tree) can give shade too
Bananas (not a tree) can give shade too

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Organization

Zahana

Antananarivo, Capital, Madagascar
http://zahana.org

Project Leader

Markus Faigle

Volunteer
Honolulu, HI United States

Where is this project located?