Prevent HIV and Eliminate Pediatric AIDS

 
$17,113 $32,887
Raised Remaining

Dear Supporters,

We are so grateful for your continued commitment to our shared mission of eliminating pediatric AIDS. As you know, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) is a global leader in the fight against pediatric HIV/AIDS, and our successes so far would not have been possible without the help of supporters like you. Working at more than 5,500 sites in 15 countries, EGPAF has provided nearly 16 million women with services to prevent transmission of HIV to their babies.

Through the important work of the local pony riders, great strides have been made in Lesotho over the past several years.  We are proud to partner with the Lesotho Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and other partners to work toward a shared goal of decreasing the rate of new HIV infections.  Thanks in part to your recent support, the Foundation works to strengthen, expand and integrate prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) and HIV care and treatment services across Lesotho.

As of September 30, 2012, EGPAF-supported programs in Lesotho had:

  • Provided nearly 112,000 women with PMTCT services.
  • Tested nearly 95,000 pregnant women for HIV.
  • Enrolled nearly 195,000 people into HIV care and support programs, including more than 10,000 children under the age of 15.
  • Started more than 91,000 people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV, including more than 4,700 children under the age of 15.

Thank you again for your continued support.  At this time we have decided to shift our GlobalGiving focus from the Lesotho pony project to another EGPAF initiative in the near future. We hope you will join one of forthcoming projects on the GlobalGiving site, which we plan to launch by early fall.

We hope you will join one of forthcoming projects on the GlobalGiving site. In the meantime, please consider joining the fight to eliminate pediatric HIV/AIDS by signing up at www.pedaids.org, or connecting with EGPAF on social media at  www.facebook.com/EGPAF or www.twitter.com/EGPAF. Again, thank you for your interest and support as we work together to achieve an AIDS-free generation.

Sincerely,

Mikaela Gibson, Development Coordinator

Links:

EGPAF CEO Charles Lyons speaks in Lesotho
EGPAF CEO Charles Lyons speaks in Lesotho

Dear Supporters,

We are so grateful for your continued commitment to our shared mission of eliminating pediatric AIDS. As you know, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) is a global leader in the fight against pediatric HIV/AIDS, and our successes so far would not have been possible without the help of supporters like you. Working at more than 5,500 sites in 15 countries, EGPAF has provided nearly 16 million women with services to prevent transmission of HIV to their babies through our innovative program implementation, research and advocacy initiatives.

Charles Lyons, EGPAF President and CEO, recently embarked on a journey to Lesotho.  He shared his experiences in an EGPAF blog post:

While in Lesotho, I witnessed the launch of the country’s first national cervical cancer center at Senkatana clinic, built to help control Lesotho’s leading cause of cancer-related deaths among Basotho women.

Only three years ago, the Kingdom – with the support of partners such as EGPAF, President’s Emergency Plan AIDS Relief and USAID – embarked on an ambitious program to ensure services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) were provided in all public health facilities. Today, these important services are provided as part of a suite of maternal child health services in all public health facilities.

The rates of cervical cancer in Lesotho are among the highest in the world as HIV positive women are four to five times more likely to develop cervical cancer than HIV-negative women.

Over time, we have learned that success in the fight against HIV requires political will and leadership in addition to resources. Through the leadership of Dr. Pinkie Manamolela, Lesotho’s health minister, and Lefu Manyokole, Lesotho Health Ministry’s permanent secretary, Lesotho has demonstrated leadership in its commitment to fight HIV and its associated diseases.

Senkatana is now set to become a national center of excellence for HIV care, tuberculosis, and reproductive health.

Seeing first-hand the progress Lesotho has made in less than three years reminds me of a statement I recently read – the greatest achievement is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving.

Now, Lesotho has embarked on a journey to protect women from one of the most preventable and treatable cancers – cervical cancer, which preys upon many women in developing countries, especially those living with HIV.

We are proud to count you as a valuable partner in Lesotho’s efforts to obliterate AIDS and join the movement to create a new generation free of HIV.

-Charles Lyons, EGPAF President and CEO

To learn more about our work in Lesotho, click here.

(Photo: Jon Hrusa/EPA, 2010)
(Photo: Jon Hrusa/EPA, 2010)

Links:

Dear Supporters,

We are so grateful for your continued commitment to our shared mission of eliminating pediatric AIDS. As you know, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation is a global leader in the fight against pediatric HIV/AIDS, and our successes so far would not have been possible without the help of supporters like you. Working at more than 5,500 sites in 15 countries, the Foundation has reached more than 16 million women with services to prevent transmission of HIV to their babies through our innovative program implementation, research and advocacy initiatives. 

Charles Lyons, our President and CEO, recently embarked on a journey to Lesotho.  He shared his experiences in a blog post:

While in Lesotho, I witnessed the launch of the country’s first national cervical cancer center at Senkatana clinic, built to help control Lesotho’s leading cause of cancer-related deaths among Basotho women.

EGPAF President and CEO Charles Lyons speaks
at the Senkatana launch in Lesotho. 
(Photo: EGPAF, 2013)

 

Only three years ago, the Kingdom – with the support of partners such as PEPFAR and USAID – embarked on an ambitious program to ensure services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) were provided in all public health facilities. Today, these important services are provided as part of a suite of maternal child health services in all public health facilities.

Now, Lesotho has embarked on a journey to protect women from one of the most preventable and treatable cancers – cervical cancer, which preys upon many women in developing countries, especially those living with HIV.

The rates of cervical cancer in Lesotho are among the highest in the world as HIV positive women are four to five times more likely to develop cervical cancer than HIV-negative women.

Over time, we have learned that success in the fight against HIV requires political will and leadership in addition to resources. Through the leadership of Dr. Pinkie Manamolela, Lesotho’s health minister, and Lefu Manyokole, Lesotho Health Ministry’s permanent secretary, Lesotho has demonstrated leadership in its commitment to fight HIV and its associated diseases.

Senkatana is now set to become a national center of excellence for HIV care, tuberculosis, and reproductive health.

Seeing first-hand the progress Lesotho has made in less than three years reminds me of a statement I recently read – the greatest achievement is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving.

We are proud to be a valuable partner in the Kingdom’s efforts to obliterate AIDS and join the movement to create a new generation free of HIV.

-Charles Lyons, EGPAF President and CEO

To learn more about our work in Lesotho, click here

A worker at a clinic in Lesotho
A worker at a clinic in Lesotho

Links:

Dear Supporters,

Thank you for your generous gift to the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. We are grateful for your support.

Elizabeth Glaser’s story began as one mother fighting for the life of her children after acquiring HIV through a blood transfusion and unknowingly passing on the virus to her daughter, Ariel, and to her son, Jake. She along, with her friends, created the Foundation in 1988 so that every mother would know how to prevent transferring HIV to her child. She pressed for the rights of every HIV-infected child to have access to the same lifesaving treatments as HIV-infected adults.

Here are the facts. Today, thanks in large part to Elizabeth, and to all those like you who have supported the Foundation, fewer than 200 babies a year are born with HIV in the United States. As well, many young adults who have contracted HIV at birth are now leading healthy, productive lives. 

But the fight continues….In 2009, 34 million people in the world were living with HIV and 2.5 million of those affected were children. More than 900 children are infected every day and almost 50% of HIV-infected infants will die before their second birthdays without diagnosis and treatment. We have the science and the medicine to prevent pediatric HIV/AIDS.

To date the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation has reached more than 14.2 million women with services to prevent transmission of HIV to their babies.  Thanks to your support we can continue our work in more than 15 countries and at more than 5,400 sites, where we’re implementing prevention, care and treatment; advancing innovative research advocating to bring dramatic change to the live of millions of women, children and families. Make a mother’s fight your fight, and help us finish the work that Elizabeth Glaser started.

For more information visit www.amothersfight.org

With much appreciation,

 

Charles J. Lyons

President and Chief Executive Officer

Links:

Greetings to our supporters!

We are so grateful for your continued commitment to our shared mission of eliminating pediatric AIDS. As you know, the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation is a global leader in the fight against pediatric HIV/AIDS, and our successes so far would not have been possible without the help of supporters like you. Working at more than 5,600 sites in 15 countries, the Foundation has reached more than 14.7 million women with services to prevent transmission of HIV to their babies through our innovative program implementation, research and advocacy initiatives. 

                                              
A CNN camera crew films Potso Seoete and his horse. (Photo: EGPAF)

As we have shared with you previously, Lesotho, a small country landlocked by South Africa, has one of the highest rates of HIV prevalence in the world. Also called "The Kingdom in the Sky," this beautiful country is comprised of 10 districts, many of which are extremely mountainous. Coupled with its complex and difficult landscape, it is incredibly challenging to reach remote communities of children, women, and families in need of HIV prevention, care, and treatment services. As donors, you supported a project designed especially to meet this community’s unique needs: employing couriers to traverse rugged terrain on horseback to transport blood samples and medicines in areas otherwise unreachable. 

Since our innovative pony program was featured on an ABC series on global health, our Lesotho pony program has been spotlighted by a variety of media outlets, including a CNN report featuring Potso Seoete, our Foundation pony courier who delivers lifesaving drugs and test results to communities in the rugged highlands of Mokhotlong, Lesotho’s most mountainous district. We would like to share Potso’s story with you:

                                                              
Potso prepares his Basotho pony for another day's journey. (Photo: Jon Hrusa/EPA)

“My name is Potso, and I’m 30 years old. I live in Mokhotlong District, Lesotho. My village, called Polomiti, is high in the mountains. The nearest town, Mapholaneng, is 30 minutes away on horseback.

The weather in Mokhotlong is very difficult. There is heavy rain in summer and lots of snow in winter. When the weather is bad, it is nearly impossible to travel anywhere by car or motorbike. The only way to get around is on foot or horseback.

Three years ago, I heard that the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation was looking for horse owners to ride to and from health clinics in the mountains. The Foundation needed help transporting blood samples from these clinics to the laboratory at Mokhotlong Hospital.

I did not own a horse then, so I saved money and purchased one for M3000 (about $400). I became a rider in the Foundation-supported “Horse-riding for Health” program.

Several days a week, I get up early and prepare my horse, Rooikat, for the journey to Molika-liko Clinic. We leave at 7 a.m. and ride four hours through the mountains. When I arrive at the clinic, the nurse gives me the blood samples drawn that morning, and I put them into an insulated pouch. Many of the samples are collected from patients living with HIV who need to have their blood tested so they can begin taking antiretroviral medications (ARVs). Some are pregnant women who need ARVs to prevent their babies from being born with HIV.

Once I’ve collected the samples, I ride Rooikat down the mountain to the main road, where a motorbike rider is waiting. I give him the samples, and he takes them to the laboratory at Mokhotlong Hospital, which is about 45 minutes away.

Without me and Rooikat, the nurses at Molika-liko Clinic could not draw blood when the weather is bad. The blood samples must reach the laboratory within six hours after they are drawn, and only horse riders can get to the clinic and back during snow and rain. Even during good weather, there aren’t enough trucks and motorbikes available to drive to Molika-liko, which is why I work year-round.

The money I earn through Horse-riding for Health is my only source of income. I use the money to buy food for my wife, my two small children, my wife’s family, and Rooikat.

Being a horse rider also improves my standing in the community. Horses are a very important part of our culture, and owning a horse has earned me increased respect from my friends and neighbors. They help take care of my horse, and I tell them about HIV and the work that the Foundation is doing in Lesotho.

It is good that I’m able to help people who are ill and need ARVs. I’m proud that Rooikat and I are helping to save lives.”

                                                             

                            A baby waits with its mother at the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) clinic in Lesotho. (Photo: EGPAF) 

Potso is one of four horse riders working for the Foundation in Mokhotlong District. Thanks to the hard work of Potso, his colleagues and to you, our supporters, the Foundation is now reaching 100% of Mokhotlong District’s population with HIV prevention, care, and treatment services!  

However, despite this amazing progress in Lesotho, more than 1,000 children around the world are still newly infected with HIV every day. Every single one of these infections is preventable and by working together, we can eliminate pediatric AIDS in Lesotho and around the world. Thank you again for your generous support, and to stay up-to-date with the Foundation’s work, please visit us at pedaids.org.

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Project Leader

Katie Cunningham

Corporate Partnerships Officer
Washington, DC United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Prevent HIV and Eliminate Pediatric AIDS