Give a Village Drinking Water in South Sudan

 
$17,510
$0
Raised
Remaining

Give a Village Drinking Water in South Sudan

Give a Village Drinking Water in South Sudan

Carrying water

Carrying water
Mrs. Jennifer is arriving home after tracking a distance of 20 km to fetch water from a spring or water source carrying a baby, and 2o liter water on her head.

Fetching water

Fetching water
Mrs. Jennifer has to walk 10 km to a spring or to water source. This reduces the time she has to complete other chores or have leisure time. This is also reduces the time children can spend doing other school assignments or playing games. Mrs. Jennifer has to walk 10 km just going and the same distance from with a child on her back, and 20 liter of muddy water on her head.

Linda Acen -explains

Linda Acen -explains
During the rainy season the 240 households always worry about water. After the rain the river becomes muddy for several weeks – or months, and it is impossible to drink it during that time. The 240 households need to call others villagers who already have fetch water before raining. They said: “to go to these families two or three times for fetching water is ok, but we feel ashamed to fetch water from them every day.” Sometimes families must walk 10km to a spring to fetch water. During the rainy season the river becomes muddy, so it becomes difficult and dangerous to fetch water.

Linda Acen - projects director

Linda Acen - projects director
In ONURA sub village most tasks are done by women and female children. Washing clothes and fetching water are especially seen as the duty of women. If this project is funded, it would be helpful for those women and children. In addition, this project contributes to gender equality by including local women in the planning and implementation. Furthermore, as a woman project manager (I, Ms. Linda Acen) will serve as a role model for the women and children of the village. If this project is successful it will challenge the traditional held idea that women cannot accomplish heroic deeds in southern Sudan.

Dr. Robert Lokong -explains

Dr. Robert Lokong -explains
In January 2010 Dr.Lokong found that these kinds of diseases are caused by the water. In February 2010 the village leader invited a health care official from Magwi County to check the river that the villagers are drinking. He found that the river was polluted with bacteria from human waste and dirty things like (clothes, mopes, rags….) that villagers wasted in the river. So the river water that 240 families now use is not safe to drink. Now the river is even dry giving no option villagers but to rely on muddy water.

Alice: I was in Onura Dec 1 2013

Alice: I was in Onura Dec 1 2013
Photo from Progress Report 'Be patient until February'

Alice Amwony: Thank you! Thank you!

Alice Amwony: Thank you! Thank you!
Photo from Progress Report 'We need Clean water to drink'

Alice: thanks for giving Onura water for life

Alice: thanks for giving Onura water for life
Photo from Progress Report 'Without Water No life in Onura'

Clean water arrived finally-said a beneficiary

Clean water arrived finally-said a beneficiary
Photo from Progress Report 'Clean Water for Drinking'
Donation Options

Funded

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.

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Organization

Project Leader

William Logai Ochieng

Oslo, Akershus Norway

Where is this project located?

Map of Give a Village Drinking Water in South Sudan