Improve lives of at-risk moms & babies in the USA

 
$20,217
$69,783
Raised
Remaining
Jul 10, 2014

Nurse-Family Partnership Saves Lives - New Study

One of the unique things about supporting Nurse-Family Partnership is that because of the research behind the program you can be sure that your support really empowers first-time moms to change their lives and the lives of their children.  Just this week, new research is out about one of the initial research trials of Nurse-Family Partnership, read the press release here:

JAMA Pediatrics Reports Nurse-Family Partnership Reduces Preventable
Death Among Mothers and Children

 MEMPHIS, TENN. (July 8, 2014) — A study published by JAMA Pediatrics – a leading, peer-reviewed
journal of the American Medical Association – found that Nurse-Family Partnership® (NFP) reduces
preventable death among both low-income mothers and their first-born children living in disadvantaged,
urban neighborhoods. This is the first randomized, clinical trial of an early intervention program
conducted in a high-income country to find evidence of reductions in maternal and child death.

“Death among mothers and children in these age ranges in the United States general population is rare, but
of enormous consequence. The high rates of death among mothers and children not receiving nurse-home
visits reflect the toxic conditions faced by too many low-income parents and children in our society. The
lower mortality rate found among nurse-visited mothers and children likely reflects the nurses’ support of
mothers’ basic human drives to protect their children and themselves,” said David Olds, Ph.D., professor
of pediatrics at the University of Colorado and lead investigator on the study.

Beginning in 1990, this trial enrolled low-income, primarily African-American mothers living in
disadvantaged neighborhoods in Memphis, Tenn., and assessed maternal and child mortality for over two
decades until 2011. Olds announced today these findings at a press conference held at Le Bonheur
Children’s Hospital, which serves families through NFP in Memphis.

Nurse-Family Partnership produced a significant reduction in preventable child death from birth until age
20. Children in the control group not receiving nurse-home visits had a mortality rate of 1.6% for
preventable causes – including sudden infant death syndrome, unintentional injuries and homicide. There
were zero preventable deaths among nurse-visited children.

In addition, over the same two-decade period, mothers who received nurse-home visits had significantly
lower rates of death for all causes compared to mothers not receiving nurse-home visits. Mothers in the “Death among mothers and children in these age ranges in the United States general population is rare, but
of enormous consequence. The high rates of death among mothers and children not receiving nurse-home
visits reflect the toxic conditions faced by too many low-income parents and children in our society. The
lower mortality rate found among nurse-visited mothers and children likely reflects the nurses’ support of
mothers’ basic human drives to protect their children and themselves,” said David Olds, Ph.D., professor
of pediatrics at the University of Colorado and lead investigator on the study.

Beginning in 1990, this trial enrolled low-income, primarily African-American mothers living in
disadvantaged neighborhoods in Memphis, Tenn., and assessed maternal and child mortality for over two
decades until 2011. Olds announced today these findings at a press conference held at Le Bonheur
Children’s Hospital, which serves families through NFP in Memphis.

Nurse-Family Partnership produced a significant reduction in preventable child death from birth until age
20. Children in the control group not receiving nurse-home visits had a mortality rate of 1.6% for
preventable causes – including sudden infant death syndrome, unintentional injuries and homicide. There
were zero preventable deaths among nurse-visited children.

In addition, over the same two-decade period, mothers who received nurse-home visits had significantly
lower rates of death for all causes compared to mothers not receiving nurse-home visits. Mothers in the control group who did not receive nurse-home visits were nearly three times more likely to die than were
nurse-visited mothers. The relative reduction in maternal mortality was even greater for deaths due to
external causes – those tied to maternal behaviors and environmental conditions – including unintentional
injuries, suicide, drug overdose and homicide. Mothers not receiving nurse-home visits were eight times
more likely to die of these causes than nurse-visited mothers.

“We intend to continue this research to see whether Nurse-Family Partnership reduces premature
mortality at later ages and corresponding health problems as the mothers and children grow older,” said
Olds.

Earlier follow-up studies of the Memphis trial found that nurse-visited mothers, compared to those
assigned to the control group, had better prenatal health and behavior; reduced rates of closely-spaced
subsequent pregnancies; decreased use of welfare, Medicaid and food stamps; fewer behavioral
impairments due to substance use; and fewer parenting attitudes that predispose them to abuse their
children. At earlier phases of follow-up, nurse-visited children,compared to children not receiving nurse-home visits, were less likely to be hospitalized for injuries through age two; less likely to have behavioral problems at school entry; and less likely to reveal depression, anxiety and substance use at age 12.

Your continued support of Nurse-Family Partnership ensures that these results can be realized by thousands of moms and babies across the United States.  

Apr 9, 2014

A Nurse-Family Partnership Mom Finds Her Voice

Brady and her daughter, Ginevieve
Brady and her daughter, Ginevieve

Nurse-Family Partnership moms come from many different backgrounds and experiences;  here is the story of one mom's success - Brady. Hers is a strong, clear voice with an energy that young people seem to have when their future is undeniably bright. To talk with Brady today, you’d never know it wasn’t always that way.

“I was in a low point,” she confides. A low point just before she met the young man who would quickly become the father of her child. Her first marriage had ended in less than a year, due to domestic abuse. The divorce was followed by job loss, and the need to move in with her grandmother for a while. But Brady began to pull herself up.

“I got a new job waitressing and moved in with a colleague who introduced me to Sean,” she said. “I tell people that he and I shook hands and we were pregnant!” she laughs, in hindsight. But at the time, it wasn’t something to laugh about.
“We were doing…not great,” said Brady. The timing could not have been worse for starting a family, as the Great Recession had begun and job layoffs were prevalent, especially in construction, where Sean worked. He had moved back in with his parents.
“We both had messed up personal lives,” said Brady. On top of that, neither one knew anything about babies, yet these almost strangers were going to soon become parents together.
Brady did know enough to seek out prenatal healthcare at a clinic in Shreveport, where a nurse referred her to Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP). “I thought it was an automatic that everyone signed up,” she remembers. “So I did.”
That was the start of her two-and-a-half year journey with two nurses who became her sounding boards, her support and her friends. Her first NFP nurse home visitor was Nancy, who helped her through her pregnancy and when her daughter was born.
July 15 marked six years since Ginevieve was born and was named after Brady’s grandmother, who was born on the same day 81 years earlier. She was perfect.
The young family, however, was struggling. “We didn’t know each other very well and I wasn’t very good about knowing how to talk our way to compromise,” said Brady. “I spent the time trying to fix everything, do everything. I think I changed all the diapers for the first two years.”
Brady was feeling the stress of the relationship and baby. On top of that, she felt criticized. “A lot of what I heard when Ginevieve was very young was how I was doing everything wrong.”
What often kept her going was Nancy and Wendi, the nurse supervisor who took over when Nancy left her job mid-way through Brady’s time in the program.
“Nancy and Wendi were there to have an adult conversation with me and care about me,” said Brady. “I didn’t have any of that. No one else was telling me I was doing a good job, but to hear from an actual nurse, validating me…I felt like a success because of that.”
Give credit to Brady, says Wendi. “She was hungry for knowledge.”
The nurse-client mom relationship is a trusted one. Nurse-Family Partnership tries to keep the same nurse with a mom throughout the program, but it isn’t always possible because of moves and job changes.

When Nancy left NFP, Wendi knew that there was a chance that Brady would not connect with her as the new nurse.
“But she took it in stride and really welcomed me with open arms,” said Wendi. “I felt like after our very first visit, I had known her a long time.”
Wendi also knew that this young woman, who was dealing with instability in her relationship, her housing situation and her job, was someone who had a great deal of strength.

“I was enchanted by Brady,” said Wendi. “She was one of the very few moms that I’ve known who was still breastfeeding at 18 months. It told me she had a lot of perseverance and heart.”
Brady had learned from Nancy just how important breastfeeding is to a baby’s health and development, and Wendi reinforced that. Brady embraced that knowledge, breastfeeding Ginevieve past the age of two. Today she believes it has made a difference to both her child and herself.
“It’s one of my proudest things,” said Brady. “It is invaluable. Ginevieve is so smart. And we are so close, because breastfeeding is not only about breastfeeding, it’s about closeness.”

Ginevieve is now an artistic little girl who reads well and is ready to start first grade in the fall of 2013. She also is one of only two children in her kindergarten class this year who were invited to test for Louisiana’s Gateway accelerated program next year.

Her mom is understandably proud, and so is her former nurse, who recently saw both Brady and Ginevieve more than three years after their “official” relationship ended. “Ginevieve was thriving,” said Wendi. “Very smart; she had a big vocabulary. Not to mention that she is preciously cute!”

Wendi is also quick to compliment her former client, who is employed as a WIC breastfeeding peer counselor. “If ever there was a role model for breastfeeding moms, Brady has a market on that!"  It is a job she adores. “I love working with moms to give back what I was given,” said Brady

Does she see just a little bit of herself in some of the young women she now helps? “Absolutely,” Brady said. “Too many women don’t have support. I didn’t.” To pay it forward just a little more, she often refers her clients, when appropriate, to Nurse-Family Partnership.

Today, Brady and Sean are no longer a couple, but they continue to raise Ginevieve together. Despite their difficult start, Brady is quick to praise. “He’s a great dad,” she said. “We made it work; we raised our daughter together for six years.”

And, thanks in part to two strong role models, Brady found her own voice that seemed to be at risk of being lost in that early rush of pregnancy, relationship and motherhood. “Everyone needs support, and for me that was NFP.”

Brady has a child who is thriving; she has a meaningful job that she loves. And, she is earning her Bachelor’s degree in Education from Louisiana State University in Shreveport. She knows that NFP made a significant difference in her life, and she knows she now loves working with moms and babies herself.

As for her future? “Wherever the Lord puts me and wherever I’ll be most effective is where I’ll go.”

Your support of Nurse-Family Partnership helps moms just like Brady to find their voice and to be able to advocate for themselves and their children.  Thank you!

Jan 8, 2014

"Enrolling in [NFP] is the best thing I ever did"

Kim and Daviontae
Kim and Daviontae

Nurse-Family Partnership is improving the lives of more than 26,000 families right now - through your support - thank you!  Following is one of our newest stories of one of our families:

Kim’s journey with Nurse-Family Partnership® (NFP) began following a referral from her doctor, and as some may say ‘just in the nick of time.’ “I first met Kim in March 2011 when she enrolled right under the 28 week deadline,” said Rubia Solis, Kim’s nurse home visitor in Lafayette, Louisiana.

Kim was living with her boyfriend at his mother’s house and was hesitant to enroll in the NFP program. She did not feel comfortable bringing a stranger into a home that wasn’t her own. However, her living situation soon changed. Kim and her boyfriend Damien were able to get their own apartment. “I enrolled in the program two days before receiving the keys to our new place,” Kim said.

Kim understood she made the right decision to enroll in the NFP program because she wanted help with her pregnancy, but she was still unsure of what to expect. “I was kind of nervous to ask questions about my body to a stranger, but the first visit actually went well!” said Kim. “Miss Rubia brought a binder with lots of pregnancy information in it. It helped me learn and made me feel comfortable asking Miss Rubia questions.”

Little did Kim know, that just a few weeks after her first home visit, she would become a new mother-far ahead of schedule.

One red flag Rubia saw during their visits was Kim’s blood pressure: it would not go down.

Upon Rubia’s advice, Kim scheduled a doctor’s appointment and was diagnosed with preeclampsia. Four weeks later she went to the emergency room for a leaking water bag. Things moved quickly at that point.

“My doctor came in my room and asked me if my water broke,” said Kim. “I wasn’t sure since my water bag was already leaking and this was my first time being pregnant, but I did feel a gush before the doctor came in.” She was later moved to a separate room to prep for an emergency C-section because her fluid levels were low. Her doctor determined for the safety of her baby, the best decision was to deliver the baby that day.

“I was extremely scared. I wasn’t due for two more months and hadn’t had my baby shower, I had too much to still prepare myself for,” said Kim. “I walked in thinking this was nothing major and I could go home.”

Kim’s son was born that day, two months before Kim’s due date. Daivontae was born 3 pounds 7 ounces and was taken to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) right away.

After waking up from her surgery Kim was unsure of what happened. “I asked the doctor, ‘did I actually have this baby?’” said Kim.

She was finally able to see her son in the NICU and when she did she broke down and cried. “It was hard seeing him on the ventilator and I asked, ‘why me, what did I do for my child to go through this?’” Kim said.

Kim and Rubia continued their visits in the NICU and formed a close and caring relationship. “It was a time of real discovery for the both of us and the baby,” said Rubia. “We didn’t have much time in the getting-to-know you phase before the baby was born and meeting in the NICU bonded us so much more.”

After learning she could take her baby boy home, Kim became extremely nervous. Daivontae weighed 4 pounds 11 ounces and his health was in good condition.

Nonetheless, taking care of her baby outside of the hospital still worried Kim. “He looked so fragile in his car seat and I wasn’t sure I was prepared, but I made it through the first night!” said Kim.

Kim did have extra help at home from her boyfriend which made tending to a new baby a little less stressful. “I would take the day shifts and Damien would take the night shifts.” Damien was involved and even attended the home visits when he could before his son was born.

Having Daivontae home was difficult at times, but Kim knew Rubia was a phone call away. “I called Miss Rubia three times a day when Daivontae was transitioning from breastfeeding to formula,” Kim said, “I felt comfortable talking to Miss Rubia; I called her before I even called my mom!”

Rubia will tell you Kim is a strong advocate for her child.  She kept every visit after she was able to take Daivontae home. “Her life was absorbed by getting what her child needed,” Rubia said.

“At nine months old they discovered Daivontae was blind in one eye,” said Rubia. “When I made a referral or suggestion, Kim was very proactive and would make phone calls and did her research. She has incredible strength for her son. Kim is a shining star.”

Now at 2 years-old, Daivontae is an active and healthy boy who loves being outside and keeps his mother and father busy. Kim has her certified nursing assistant certificate and plans on continuing her education and obtaining her LPN credentials. She credits her motivation to her nurse home visitor Rubia, the NFP program and her son.

“I stopped putting things off because I am more focused. Nothing is getting in my way,” said Kim.

Daivontae will continue to wear his glasses and if he wants to play sports as he gets older, he’ll wear goggles to protect his eyes. “He’s adjusted and you would never think he has a serious vision problem,” said Kim.

Kim describes motherhood as being loving, challenging and rewarding. Her hopes for the future are to complete her nursing education, happiness for her son, and eventually to purchase a home in the country with her boyfriend. “I love the country life, I grew up in the country and I want my son to have that life, too.”

Despite early obstacles, Kim gained the knowledge she needed to be a good parent from the help of her nurse, Rubia. “Enrolling in the program is the best thing I ever did. Without the program I wouldn’t be this far. Nurse-Family Partnership taught me to be a good parent,” Kim said, “I look at life a different way than I did before I had Daivontae. I now live for my child. He is the spark in my life and he keeps me going.”

_______________________________________________________

Kim graduated from the NFP program in April 2013 and currently lives in Lafayette, Louisiana, with her boyfriend of eight years, Damien, and their son Daivontae.  Your support of Nurse-Family Partnership make successes like this and many others possible.

Links:

Oct 9, 2013

Helping Families with Economic Self-Sufficiency

Lum, Bless and Min
Lum, Bless and Min

One of the many things Nurse-Family Partnership, along with your support, helps families to think about and plan for is economic self-sufficiency.  The following story illustrates this as you learn about the amazing journey of a young refugee family just coming to the United States:

Lum was just beginning her new life in the United States when she found out she was pregnant. She and her boyfriend Min, both refugees from Burma, would have their first child together. It was another great challenge in their young lives.

“I felt so bad,” Lum said. “I didn’t know how I would continue my life. I needed school, and to continue working and I wanted a baby.”

Lum had fled Burma out of fear of the militant groups, and had lost her mom to a violent death in Burma. She was thankful to be in the United States, but she now had only her sister and brother as family to turn to in Des Moines as she and Min started their own family.

Then a local healthcare provider referred her to the Nurse-Family Partnership program at Visiting Nurse Services of Iowa.

“As refugees, we really need someone to be a guide for us. I didn’t know how to take care of a baby, and the culture in my home country is different than the culture in this country,” said Lum.

Because Lum spoke little English, Marcia’s first home visit with Lum was done through a Chin-speaking interpreter. Marcia saw a timid and reserved young woman. “We really needed my nurse Marcia,” said Lum. “She could see how I lived – what I needed. When Marcia comes to my home, I feel more comfortable for talking.”

Lum relied on Marcia to help her fill out her Medicaid enrollment forms, decipher mail from state agencies and call her doctor. Lum was lost in a new country without the knowledge of how to access resources. “I had to help her advocate for herself,” Marcia said.

“Because I didn’t have a parent in the U.S., I felt really lonely,” Lum continued. “I didn’t know anything about being a mother. Marcia was like my sister, parent and my wonderful teacher. I was so happy when I met with Marcia. I could ask her everything I needed. I asked her so many questions.”

As the home visits with Marcia continued, Lum stopped using the interpreter and practiced her English. And, she slowly opened up when Marcia asked one special question: what was Lum’s heart’s desire? Lum said she wanted to have her very own hair salon.

“It was my dream to have my own salon!” Lum recalled.  “I thought when I became pregnant maybe it’s too much to want my own salon. When I told Marcia, she convinced me that I could get my dream. She made me feel more comfortable.”

Marcia encouraged her to follow her dream by taking classes at the Iowa School of Beauty. 

“I saw many strengths in Lum,” Marcia said. “She was industrious and hardworking. And she had a desire to
succeed and the benefit of a wonderful support system.”

Lum was trying to do it all while being pregnant, and it wasn’t easy. She attended school for eight hours a day, and then would continue on to work evenings at a chain store until 11 p.m. Adding to her load, her pregnancy was making her nauseous and tired. As they watched her try to cope, her family and Min decided they would take on
additional responsibilities to help Lum concentrate on graduating and allow her to stop working.

She was determined to graduate from beauty school, but had her final few weeks of pregnancy to go. With her graduation planned just over a week before her due date, Lum knew timing was everything. She had to have a healthy, full-term pregnancy to be able to attend all the classes needed for graduation. With guidance from her nurse Marcia, support from her family and a bit of luck, Lum finished her classes before giving birth to a beautiful, healthy son.  Lum and Min named him Bless – for the blessing he adds to their lives.

Marcia says the Nurse-Family Partnership aims for three main goals for every client: healthy pregnancy and delivery, improved child health and development, and economic self-sufficiency. Lum is achieving all three.

“I’ve gotten to see her inner strengths grow and blossom as I’ve watched her evolve and transform into a strong, confident mom,” said Marcia.

“Marcia gives me strength,” Lum remarked. “She was my guide to become more powerful. Marcia is my light.”

As Bless approaches his second birthday, Lum no longer needs public support from WIC or Medicaid. With her partner Min to do the electrical wiring and her family and Marcia connecting her with resources, Lum has made her dream come true. She is now is the owner of The Amazing Beauty Salon. She even had the self-reliance to develop a business plan and to take out a small business loan. Lum’s salon is attracting customers and she has hired her first employee.

“The Nurse-Family Partnership program really helped her to be self-sufficient,” Marcia said. Just like the name of her
salon, Marcia describes Lum as truly amazing – an excellent mother and skilled business woman. No longer the shy
young woman Marcia first met, Lum now feels empowered to advocate for herself and go after what she wants.

Lum and Min are now expecting the birth of their second child. They feel ready to grow their family and they want
Bless to have a sibling companion in life. Lum says she now has the knowledge, thanks to Marcia, to be a confident mom.

When asked how her life has changed, Lum exclaimed, “I changed a lot. I know myself. I now feel comfortable with my life. Before I thought maybe I can’t get it. Now, I know I can get it and I did it!”

*********

Nurse-Family Partenership nurses are there with their clients to help them be the best parents they can be, the best advocates for themselves and their children, and to realize their own potential.  Your support helps make these important life steps possible and we thank you!

Bless, Min and Lum with their nurse Marcia
Bless, Min and Lum with their nurse Marcia

Links:

Jul 10, 2013

Empowering Women, Changing Lives

This video is from one of our Nurse-Family Partnership agencies in Texas and it is a great example of how Nurse-Family Partnership is able to step in to the lives of vulnerable moms and their babies and make a difference.  Our nurses work with more than 26,000 families in 43 states in the U.S. to improve and change the lives of these families.  Your support of NFP is critical to our ability to impact these lives!  Thank you for being involved and please tell more people about Nurse-Family Partnership and how we empower women and change their lives and the lives of their children!

Links:

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating or by subscribing to this project's RSS feed.

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $20
  • $22
  • $37
  • $50
  • $252
  • $408
  • $3,000
  • $20
    each month
  • $22
    each month
  • $37
    each month
  • $50
    each month
  • $252
    each month
  • $408
    each month
  • $3,000
    each month
  • $
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Project Leader

Michelle Stapleton

Denver, CO United States

Where is this project located?