Protect Marine Ecosystems in Mexico

 
$12,214 $786
Raised Remaining
Artist Alejandro of
Artist Alejandro of 'Washed Up'

Dear Supporter,

Never has the saying “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” been so relevant than at the Museum of Garbage in the Sian Ka’an Reserve.  The Museum of Garbage, or “El Museo de la Basura”, is part of multimedia artist Alejandro Durán’s Washed Up project. Alejandro Durán has been visiting Sian Ka’an for over five years. When he first arrived he was surprised and disgusted by the amount of rubbish that washed up on the shores in this UNESCO World Heritage site. He says that his project, Washed Up, looks at the “issue of plastic pollution making its way across the ocean and onto the shores of Sian Ka’an, Mexico’s largest federally-protected reserve.”

Alejandro has found rubbish from over 50 different countries, which has been carried to the shores of Sian Ka’an over the second largest barrier reef system in the world. The Washed Up project’s May events and the opening of the Museum of Garbage were designed to create and promote environmental awareness, and, to ultimately encourage changing the patterns of consumption and waste that humans have developed.

GVI helped to prepare and set up the art exhibitions at the Museum for the visiting children from Punta Allen. Volunteers reconstructed the toothbrush piece consisting of over 50 toothbrushes, which had been found washed up on the shores of Sian Ka’an. Others rinsed over 200 different shoes in various shades of blue to form a beautiful piece where all the shoes were placed in a massive spiral amongst the mangroves. Many others organized and sorted through rubbish with everybody contributing in many ways to help with the set-up of the Museum.

When the children came, staff and volunteers showed them around the museum with Alejandro as a guide. All of the students were surprised at the diverse origins of the rubbish and everyone was engaged and curious as to what piece of rubbish came from which country. The students spoke about their disappointment that there is so much trash in the ocean and talked about the messages they would like to send to the world to try to stop the pollution of the ocean.

The students all explored the museum and learnt a lot about recycling and plastics including which plastics are recyclable and which aren’t. A small beach clean with all of the children was completed after the tour and, after a talk from Alejandro, the event came to a close.

The final activity of the Washed Up project happened on Monday 11 May 2015 where the whole GVI team travelled down to Punta Allen, taking two truck loads of rubbish from the Museum. The rubbish was then carefully sorted into different colours ready to create a new art installation. In Punta Allen, GVI went to the Primary and Secondary school to take groups of students out to the local park where they made posters with the messages they wanted to send to the world about recycling and ocean pollution. 

Our Marine conservation project at Pez Maya can only be useful if we are able to educate people on how to improve their interactions with nature and help to protect and conserve our environment. The Washed Up initiative was an effective way to get important messages across to all of those involved.

GVi Pez Maya were very happy that they could support and contribute to such an amazing project. 

Thank you for your continued support, 

GVI Mexico

The local community at Punta Allen get involved
The local community at Punta Allen get involved
Students getting excited about recycling!
Students getting excited about recycling!
One of the installations at the Museum of Garbage
One of the installations at the Museum of Garbage

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Dear Supporter,

Very little is known about trends of coral bleaching on a global scale. Currently, coral health monitoring mainly occurs around a few reefs that are regularly visited by scientists. There are many questions that will have to be answered in order to try and save the reefs. This is why we at Pez Maya are working hard to get as many CoralWatch data from our reefs as possible. We send the data to the CoralWatch project where it is analyzed and made available on the project’s website. This will make it possible to compare the condition of many different reefs at any one point in time, as well as the condition of a single reef over time.

At Pez Maya, we train our volunteers to perform the CoralWatch by first teaching them about the biology and ecology of corals and the different species of coral that occur around our base. There are over 50 species of stony coral in 12 families found on our dive sites, of which the majority is used for CoralWatch dives. These corals come in many different shapes and sizes, from boulders to branches and from golf ball sized to the size of a small car.

Our divers go down in buddy pairs with the necessary equipment, consisting of the Coral Watch Chart, a dive torch, slate and pencil. When they find a candidate for the CoralWatch, they look for the darkest and the lightest part of the coral and find the corresponding colors in color brightness on the chart, as an indication of the amount of bleaching of the coral tissue. Finally, the divers write all their findings down on the slate. Volunteers collect data from 20 different corals they encounter during each CoralWatch dive.

During the first trimester of 2015, 21 CoralWatch dives were done. Almost all of these dives were done in March when the majority of our coral volunteers were trained to the level of CoralWatchers. In total, 420 corals were monitored in 14 hours of diving.

At Pez Maya, we are passionate about this project and believe efforts such as these are important for the understanding of coral reefs, not only the beautiful reef in front of our base, but reefs all over the world! It is one of the many ways we contribute to marine conservation on a daily basis in our Mexican GVI hub.

Thank you for your continued support on this project.

All the best

GVI Pez Maya

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Dear Supporter, 

In order to contribute to reduce pollution, threats to the local fauna and to collect data on the composition of the marine debris that washes up on Pez Maya beach, a weekly cleanup is carried out by volunteers and staff. In the last three months of 2014, a total of 452 kg of rubbish was collected, adding up to a total of 2.3 tons of rubbish removed from the beach during the year.

The beach cleans take place on a weekly basis and 9 zones of 150 meters length each are monitored. The first zone starts in the mangrove mouth and the last one finishes at the southern point of Pez Maya beach.

Volunteers and staff members pick up all the debris that they find from the tide line to the vegetation line, this to avoid including waste created by terrestrial sources. All the debris is separated in 4 categories: Non-recyclable, Glass, Plastic bottles and Plastic bottle caps. After collecting it, the debris is weighted and the information is entered into the data base.A total of 452.75 kilograms of trash was removed from the beach, cutlery being the most abundant item (1846 pieces).  

It was a very successful year in which the team managed to clean more trash from the Pez Maya shoreline. Effective documentation and monitoring activities to assess the types and amounts of marine debris can help in the global reduction and abatement of the marine debris problem. Raising awareness about this problem is vital to encourage people to have environmentally friendly practices. 

Thank you for continuing to support this program.

All the best

GVI Mexico

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Green turtle laying Chelonia mydas
Green turtle laying Chelonia mydas

Dear Supporter,

The turtle project is very busy at the moment with lots of turtle nests in San Juan and Yuyum Beaches. Every night we have approximately 8 turtles in San Juan and most nights two or three hatching nests. In Yuyum, during the inspection we had 5 or 6 new nests and about 8 to 10 nests to clean each week. 

During August we had found 199 nests of Chelonia mydas (Green turtle) and 68 of Caretta caretta (Loggerhead turtle) in San Juan, but on the 29th August when our partners helped out on a inspection in San Juan we found 136 extra nests and we cleaned more than 20, giving us a total of 403 nests in San Juan.

After the San Juan inspection, Flora Fauna y Cultura de México came back to base to help us with Yuyum, finding 76 nests and cleaning more than 15. Adding this to the 33 nests of Chelonia mydas and 20 of Caretta caretta that had been found before, we now have 129 nests in Yuyum.

With turtle season about to finish, we have had so far more than 2000 little turtles in our two beaches. We are very excited to see the final results of the season, and we feel very lucky to be able to contribute towards conserving the sea turtle species that nest it the region.

Thanks you for continuing to support this project.

All the best

GVI Mexico

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Dear Supporter, 

One of the main objectives of Pez Maya marine conservation project is to collect data for the MBRS Synoptic Monitoring Program on behalf of our partners Amigos de Sian Ka’an (ASK) and CONANP. We train volunteers in four different MBRS methodologies, and when they complete their training they start to monitor. This quarter (April-June) we managed to complete five monitor sites for fish and coral.

Objectives

  • To continue with the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS) Synoptic Monitoring Program in strategic locations in the north of Sian Ka'an reserve, to provide current information on the status of the reefs for management decisions.
  • To train participants in the expeditions in the MBRS methodology, through the identification offish, hard corals, invertebrates and algae.

The volunteers are trained in the four different methodologies of MBRS: Point Intercept method for percentage cover (PI), characterization of the Coral Communities (CC), and belt transect counts for defined fish species, adults and recruitments / juveniles. Volunteers go through extensive training both in and out of the water, learning Latin names for corals, conducting coral and fish identification tests, practice monitoring, sizing, laying lines, etc.  Training can take anywhere between 4-6 weeks depending on ability, logistics and weather.

Each quarter we aim to monitor as many sites as possible, and for the April to June quarter we were very happy that we managed to complete 5 out of 11 monitoring sites. It was really successful and a great occasion was when we had four different monitoring buddy pairs on one boat.

Results

For the April- June quarter a total 5 sites were monitored from 11 sites: Pedro Paila 05 (PP05), Pedro Paila 10 (PP10), San Miguel de Ruiz 10 (SMDR10), San Miguel de Ruiz 20 (SMDR20) and Punta Yuyum 20 (PY20). Both coral and fish transects were completed at these sites. 

PP05 presents a high predominance of algae cover (74.50%) and a low percentage of hard coral cover (7.33%).

The dominant fish family is Acanthuridae with 84.55%, this is due to the higher number of individuals of blue tangs, ocean and doctor surgeon fish, which are most common in the reef. Also these species often travel and feed in schools which makes their presence in the transect higher. 

All the sites were done for both coral and fish giving us a clear idea of what is happening on the reef. Thank you for supporting this cause, your donations make all the above happen!

Thank you

GVI Mexico

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Project Leader

Sophie Birkett

GVI Charitable Trust Manager
St Albans, Herts United Kingdom

Where is this project located?

Map of Protect Marine Ecosystems in Mexico