38 Hectares of Valuable Resources for the Maleku

 
$1,385 $385,705
Raised Remaining

We at La Reserva want to take this moment to thank all of the donors who contributed support to the project “38 Hectares of Valuable Resources for the Maleku”. Unfortunately this project has been posted on the Global Giving website for several years now and we are no closer to getting the project funded. At this time we feel it is best to close the project listing and direct the funding to another equally worthy project. We feel your support is better used consolidated into another project that has a chance of getting implemented within a reasonable time frame. Our organization continues to work with the Maleku and advocate for indigenous rights. It’s through global awareness and directed resources to these communities that provides opportunities for them to continue to practice their cultural and economic traditions. Oftentimes these communities are forgotten or so far afield that people don’t take notice of their plight. We want to draw attention to how social and environmental justice should be focused on indigenous communities’ rights to the land and the forest. The project “38 Hectares of Valuable Resources for the Maleku” was a small step in the direction towards remediating past wrongs suffered by the Maleku tribe. La Reserva Forest Foundation will nurture our partnership with the Maleku and find other means of elevating their rights and livelihood, to create and promote an inclusive world where all communities are acknowledged.

Thank you again to all of the dedicated supporters and believers in the work La Reserva Forest Foundation does to address global climate change and protect and restore forests in the tropics. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact me personally at matt@lrff.org.

Starting out, the land is prepared/cleared
Starting out, the land is prepared/cleared

LRFF planted 7000 trees in July 2014 (you remember “For the Monkeys”) and another 1000 in September 2014, this time at the Maleku Indigenous Tribe Reserve again.

We planted Helen Hollenbeck's trees on September 8th at Nicida Elizondo's property in Palenque Margarita. It was a super hot day, full sun and there were 6 of us planting. YES me 2! A BIG thank you goes out to Beth Hollenbeck for her generous donation to honor her late sister, Helen, making this project possible. 

Helen was one of LRFF's first supporters, when I founded the organization in 2005 in Costa Rica. She was instrumental in putting together our first, local fundraiser at the nearby "party house". She continued to support our projects until her death almost two years ago. She now has a one-hectare forest that holds her spirit, along the Rio Sol adjacent to the 35-hectare Rio Sol Biological Corridor project planted in 2011 - 2012 (35,000 trees).

See the photos for a sequential view of the planting…another 1000 trees in the ground. They will sequester and store more than 20 metric tons of GHG emissions each year.

We finished the planting by 3 pm and then went to pay doña Nicida for the trees she raised in her nursery for six months prior to the planting. We planted over 95 native species. 

 

Maleku Cultural Festival

My family, the Maleku indigenous tribe, held their annual cultural festival the first weekend in October. I haven't attended since 2010 but made it a priority this year.  I didn't get many photos but my friend, Hiqui Maleku posted Ricardo Araya's professional quality photos and I wanted to share them with you...

One other contest was the Chicha drinking contest. Chicha is the Maleku version of wine or beer, fermented Yuca (Cassava), Corn or even Pineapple. This year the contestants were all women and Daisy won by drinking a large bowl in less than 45 seconds.

HAPPY NEW YEAR...and LET'S GET PLANTING IN 2015! 

Yours truly planting! :)
Yours truly planting! :)
Sharpening the machete
Sharpening the machete
1000 trees in the ground the same day
1000 trees in the ground the same day
Maleku cultural festival...fish anyone?
Maleku cultural festival...fish anyone?
Weaving
Weaving
Kiki Biological Corridor - Planting Day
Kiki Biological Corridor - Planting Day

Failure is a feat. It’s so true; we’ve learned this at La Reserva Forest Foundation and we’re proud to share our story, especially if it can help another non-profit realize what a valuable experience it is to “fail”.

Our first reforestation projects were informal affairs. We would collect funding to implement the projects by holding a local annual fundraiser. Our first project was a one-kilometer long biological corridor adjacent to La Reserva forest preserve in northern Costa Rica. We were able to plant the project in June 2008 because we collected the funds by throwing a party featuring live music, a silent auction and Mexican cuisine. That was the Kiki Corridor project.

In 2009, we had a big barbecue that included rides on a sailboat in the local port on Lake Arenal with live music and dancing. This time our goal was to fund a project that included three separate areas owned by the same man, a foreign resident here in the lake area. Two of the properties were local in Sabalito and Rio Piedras, while the other was in the Pacific coast community of Paraiso near Playa Junquillal in Guanacaste. We reached our fundraising goal and planted all three properties between June and October 2009, a total of six hectares and 6,000 trees.

One thing should be added here for the purpose of this “failure” story…up until now, we didn’t have any formal agreement or contract with the landowner. We didn’t see any reason for it since the people we were working with were personal friends or neighbors.

As with all of our projects, we maintain the trees for two years after the initial planting to keep them free of vines and grasses. After two years, they’ve usually developed enough to shade out the surrounding vegetation and be left on their own. We completed this maintenance on all three properties from 2009 to 2011, investing substantial amounts of time and funding in the travel, maintenance and wages paid to the crew. One day in 2011 the landowner called us to say he’d brought a “forest engineer” to look at the properties and the “engineer” was horrified with the native species we’d planted. He told the landowner that there was no timber there of any financial value, and that he’d be better off removing the “useless” trees and replacing them with more valuable timber tree species. And you know what? That’s exactly what he did. He cut down the beautiful, native trees we worked so hard to find, raise, and plant in order to establish a diverse forest restoration project – the kind that LRFF is so famous for today.

As difficult as this experience was, we’re grateful because this “failure” led to an airtight contract that we now enter into with all landowners. We sign the contract with them on the same day we pay them for the trees in their nursery and before we begin the planting. The most important clause makes the landowner responsible for the safety of the baby trees, e.g., no spraying of agro-chemicals, no damage to the trees due to broken fencing, livestock, etc., or the landowner is required to reimburse LRFF for the damages. This contract has been tested and proven valid with law enforcement officials and in the courts these past 3 years. You can read all about it in this recent post from May 2014, “Continuing Care for Communities and Forests”.

So you see failure can equal success. Always remember that the crises in our lives are actually the opportunities the universe is bestowing upon us to learn and improve. We’ve planted over 70,000 trees since this story took place, and we continue onward and upward daily.  

Fundraiser Barbecue in Costa Rica for project
Fundraiser Barbecue in Costa Rica for project
School children planting in Sabalito 2009
School children planting in Sabalito 2009
Planting day in Rio Piedras, 2009
Planting day in Rio Piedras, 2009
Police enforcement of LRFF contract, 2014
Police enforcement of LRFF contract, 2014
Maleku Scribes
Maleku Scribes

La Reserva Forest Foundation (LRFF) works closely with local communities to ensure that our projects deliver the best possible social and environmental outcomes. However, we’re always looking for new opportunities to learn more about the communities where we work in order to better serve their needs. This summer, Global Giving provided us with the opportunity to do just that through their newly released program and Storytelling Fund (see an announcement regarding the launch of the fund and related program at http://tools.blog.globalgiving.org/2014/04/17/announcing-the-community-feedback-fund/).

After applying to the fund and receiving a generous $1,300 grant to undertake the project, LRFF reached out to local high schools in two of the communities where we work to recruit student volunteers. Eager to learn more about their communities (and excited to earn a small stipend for their efforts), each volunteer went through a training that introduced them to LRFF, the Storytelling Fund, the importance of social science research and their assignments over the next several weeks. After practicing with each other and gaining some experience in a quick trial run, we sent the volunteers out into their communities to conduct interviews using prepared questionnaires with two main prompts:

(1) Please tell a story about a time when a person or an organization tried to help someone or change something in your community.

(2) Please tell a story about a time when you had to choose between protecting the environment and maintaining a livelihood. Include if/how individuals or organizations were involved in the conflict.

The results? LRFF has already collected over 130 stories addressing topics from volcanic eruptions and earthquakes to arsenic in the groundwater. Some of the stories are optimistic – promising tales of the recovery of iguanas or scarlet macaws – while others sadly document the degradation of tropical forests or long-abandoned community centers. But however different the stories may be, they all remind us of one thing: the undertakings of non-profits, other organizations and individuals do not always align with the interests of local communities, and this misalignment is often to the detriment of the intervening body, the communities themselves, or both. For LRFF, this makes listening to the communities where we work as critical to the realization of our own mission as it is to addressing the concerns of the communities we seek to serve. Now, as we sift through the stories and prepare to organize and analyze the data they contain, we hope to pan out the clues that will lead us to these win-win scenarios for tropical forests and local livelihoods alike.

We hope you continue to follow us in this endeavor to see what secrets the stories reveal!

Maleku scribes writing their first story
Maleku scribes writing their first story
Gretchen shuffling stories
Gretchen shuffling stories
Tronadora student with Gretchen
Tronadora student with Gretchen
Carlos, Tronadora scribe
Carlos, Tronadora scribe
Daniela, Tronadora scribe
Daniela, Tronadora scribe
Tronadora scribe
Tronadora scribe
Luis, Tronadora scribe
Luis, Tronadora scribe

Links:

Rio Celeste, the turquoise river
Rio Celeste, the turquoise river

We had a distinguished visitor in March, Ron Jones. Ron learned about La Reserva almost a year ago and contacted us, interested in partnering with us to help plant even more trees. All of our contact was via internet and it wasn't until the end of February that he was able to make the trip to Costa Rica from Florida to meet us face to face. 

I took Ron all over the area showing him the projects we have planted to date and our crowning glory, the one that I am most proud of, the Rio Sol Biological Corridor. This project, "38 Hectares of Valuable Resources for the Maleku", was part of the Rio Sol project because we reforested the remaining 14 hectares of Marvin's farm still in pasture. The other 28 hectares are covered with a majestic, primary forest, are at the headwaters of the Rio Sol and also the "spring" or source of all the potable water flowing down to the three Maleku villages. 

On the day we visited, before meeting with the Maleku Tribal Council in the afternoon, we went out to check on the nurseries for the next project we will plant when the rainy season begins. It's 6000+ trees in a continuous biological corridor on two different farms owned by Elias Cruz. The project was posted on Global Giving, "For The Monkeys" but was fully funded by our corporate sponsor Strack Premium Transportation. You can see in the photos how the nurseries look, lots of trees and lots of work went into creating the shady bower for the baby tree's protection. 

On the way back to meet with the Tribal Council we drove over the Rio Celeste and Ron thought the river was contaminated because of the bright blue color. He was amazed that it was naturally turquoise and shared a photo with us from the bridge.

Speaking with the Tribal Council secretary and treasurer, Emigdio Cruz and Alfredo Acosta, respectively, Ron wanted to know how we can help the tribe, what are their needs and biggest issues. I mentioned that from the very beginning, when we first contacted them, the Maleku have said they want their decreed territory returned to them however possible and when returned they would partner with LRFF to reforest 2/3's of it. The governement of Costa Rica decreed 3000 hectares as Maleku territory in 1976 but to date have not expropriated the lands owned by the non-indigenous landowners. This is still their biggest issue and that's what this project is all about. 

Because LRFF is founded  on only "positive action" the best solution we could come up with is to attempt to buy some of the lands back via donations from people around the world who understand and appreciate the plight of this tribe. Then, hopefully, after buying back a couple of farms the government will be exposed and pressured into doing whatever is necessary to return this small portion of the Maleku's original 60,000 hectares to them. Marvin wants to sell, is begging to sell the property! This is our chance...if we can come up with even part of the full amount needed we can probably bargain with Marvin and get the first farm back to the people who truly own it. 

One of Elias Cruz
One of Elias Cruz's nurseries
Elias second nursery, 5000 trees "For the Monkeys"
Elias second nursery, 5000 trees "For the Monkeys"
Rancho of Alfredo Acosta, Maleku Tribal Council
Rancho of Alfredo Acosta, Maleku Tribal Council
Tribal Council Meeting
Tribal Council Meeting

Links:

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Organization

La Reserva Forest Foundation

Tilaran, Guanacaste, Costa Rica
http://www.lrff.org

Project Leader

Matthew Lee

Project Leader
Tilaran, Guanacaste Costa Rica

Where is this project located?

Map of 38 Hectares of Valuable Resources for the Maleku