Lifeskills for 2,743 children in South Africa

 
$48,315
$1,685
Raised
Remaining
Camping without tents.
Camping without tents.


Dear Friends

We have a major project on board, we are fundraising for a farm. On


We continue on, although we are attracting small donors we continue on with our fundraising plans to purchase our farm. Over six proposals have gone out to international donors to assist us with the purchase of our farm. All six have been declined however we continue to fundraise and to carry out our activities.

For example, over the weekend a camp was held in Mwamitwa with 30 Scouts. This was a village based camp and comes with inherent issues around safety and security. Although the venue was a Drop in Centre on the weekends we have to be very vigilant to make sure the children's safety is secured. It is difficult because there are many shebeens (taverns) in all the villages and so dealing with intoxicated people makes village camping a challenge. Hence the decision to move ahead with the purchase of a farm where safety will be assured.

This camp was exciting because it was run by the Rovers from Mwamitwa area (Rovers are over 18yrs up to 26yrs) with minimal support from Keep The Dream196. It means the program is becoming more sustainable and less dependent on the NGO for staffing, support and training. This is exciting. The program is growing, the Scouts are active, the Rovers are loving being a part of the program and giving back to their communities. Kheto is not just a Rover but is also a Field Officer with Keep The Dream196. Since working with us he has been saving and now has enough money to continue his Bachelors in Computer Science. Another team mate at the camp is Ntsako, his story is below.

Thank you to all who have made our impact possible. Thank you for partnering with us as we slowly but surely keep moving on!

On May 13th 2015 there is a matching bonus day. Please consider donating on this day towards KTD196 and your donation will be increased by Global Giving.

Thank you once again for helping us acheive our goals

My name is Tsako and I have been a scout since 2009 and I am very proud of what I do. I have earned love, respect, support and mostly I have something to keep me busy day after day. I am a Troop Leader for 1st Mohlaba and I now have developed 1st Petanenge Scout Troop also I am the Assistant Troop Scouter to 1st Sasekani Troop.


Scouts is like my peacemaker because when I think of scouts joy, happiness, smiles, caring and respect appears on my fare. The Scout trail says it is our turn to spread the scout message a little bit wider and I am doing so to create friendship and brotherhood amongst our beautiful country. Day after day appreciate the responsibility mum Rose and Akela Zabe who have given me many opportunities. Thank you Keep The Dream196 you have given me courage and I am well motivated, I will keep my dream

Kheto Rover 1st Nghonyama Crew
Kheto Rover 1st Nghonyama Crew
Ntsako - A Rover at the latest camp
Ntsako - A Rover at the latest camp

Links:

Nkulu Mabuza 2015
Nkulu Mabuza 2015

Dear All,

Welcome to 2015! Why is this significant? When we started in August 2007 it was the beginning of the International Global Financial Crisis and we were told we were crazy to even consider starting a non profit organization never lone survive the first 6 months. Well its now been 8yrs and we continue to grow and develop. You may not have noticed but the name of the project has changed to reflect the number of children we are now serving and in this last 12months we have increased 28% primarily because of the support we have received from people like yourselves and from our International donors.

We have had a number of changes in 2014 for example:

For the Children we have been able to hold 15 camps and take over 1,000 children camping, during these camps the children learnt leadership skills, were exposed to issues around environmental education, conservation and preservation and team work exercises to name just a few. This is the first time we have been able to take so many children to camp and also the first time that staff have stepped up and run their own camps. This was reported on in my last epistle.

Organizationally we have a desire to have our own office space, camp ground and activity area all rolled up in to one site. Currently, we operate out of my home which is now consumed by KTD196 and we are in desperate need of office space, storage, meeting and training venue as well as a corporate space that donors can identify. We have found such a space which is a 21hectare farm with all the infrasture required, a GlobalGiving campaign has been commneced and can be found at http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/sustainability-independence-development-south-africa/

2014 was a year of consolidation dispite our growth, 2015 I believe will be a year of organizational growth and development which will enable us to support many more children through our project. It is exctiting to see how the children mature and grow up within the program to then leave, go to college or university and take the skills they have learnt to other areas and start the program in the new areas. One such leading light of the program is Nkulu Mabuza a social worker with Keep The Dream196 as she explains below.

“Keep The Dream196 built my personality and inspired my profession”

Nkululeko ‘Nkulu’ Mabuza is 23 years old and lives in Tzaneen in the Limpopo Province with her mom and younger sister. She is currently working as a social worker for ‘Keep The Dream196’, a local NGO’s that strives to assist children to overcome difficult life circumstances by empowering them through the provision of skills and inner strength so they are able to realize their full potential and contribute to the growth of South Africa. ‘Keep The Dream196’ has incorporated Scouting into its programming and uses the Scout Promise, Laws and programme to uplift and educate the children and youths in their care.

Nkulu was born in the Shiluvane village and joined Scouting at the age of 11 when her mom started the first Scout Troop in Tzaneen under KTD196. “Initially I was hesitant and didn’t really see the point, but soon I realized how much fun Scouting is and how many new friends I was making. I remember the very first camp I went on I was terrified! I had never camped before, I didn’t know the girls I was sharing a tent with and the first night I was so scared. However, by the second night I didn’t want to go home. And that is what Scouting is about. It teaches you how to adapt to certain situations, how to make friends and above all how to cope and manage in any situation you find yourself in. You actually learn to be a chameleon”, she reminisces.

“I met Louise Batty the Director of ‘Keep The Dream’ in 2003. After I finished my studies at Varsity I knew I wanted to give back to children in my home town and invest in them like Louise and my mother did for me. They pushed me to be the best I can be and so I returned home and joined the KTD196 team. In Limpopo we see a lot of gender based violence and teen pregnancies. In my work I strive to empower and help both children and parents to overcome and see past their pain and to support each other in succeeding in life. I think this is something that I have always been passionate about and I do credit Keep The Dream196 for inspiring me to be who I am today. You see as a Scout you get exposed to different people from various places, classes and walks of life. You go out into the wild and learn how to survive and respect the environment we have been given. Experiencing all of this at a young age establishes a solid foundation on which you can build as a young adult. You will have an in-depth understanding of the importance of values, they will come naturally to you. I can confidently say that I am who I am today because of Keep The Dream196, it built my personality and inspired my profession.”

When asked whether she thinks she is a positive role model to young girls in her home town she giggles and says “There were seven girls in my Scout Troop when we started. I think we are all trying to lead by example and not by words alone. I think all our personal stories are testimony to the power and influence KTD196 has had on our lives. Six of us have graduated and are working in helping professioins and the other two are still studying and will be graduating soon. We have all worked hard and are achieving our dreams! It’s not because you start your life in a rural area that you need to think you cannot succeed. Not all children are equally strong at school. Some children have talents that lay elsewhere then academic achievements. Yes they need to work hard at school, but thanks to Scouting and KTD196 where you get exposed to a number of other skills, you can discover and nurture your talents like in building, singing or drawing for example. By helping children find out that they do have a talent that they can nurture, you build hope and create dreams for future success … that is the power of Keep The Dream196!”

For this inspiring young lady the journey does not end here “I dream of a ‘Keep The Dream196’ franchise and a bigger Scouting Movement with more members from rural areas throughout South Africa. I hope to inspire a lot more children to see the bigger picture and to dream and achieve their goals in life.”

Keep The Dream196 is an independent, non-profit, childrens rights movement dedicated to the development of young people in achieving their full potential as individuals and responsible citizens. Central in this programme is a continuous transference of values such as honesty, loyalty, responsibility, respect; all aimed at governing individual behaviour and the development of strong leadership skills that will equip members to be of service to others and to their communities.

KTD196 Dream Team
KTD196 Dream Team

Links:

Learning how to make and use a recycled camp stove
Learning how to make and use a recycled camp stove

Dear Friends,

Wow, I cant believe it has only been 3months since our last report, time has flown.

Thank you for all your on going support and encouragement throughout this year it has been tremendous. We are slowly reaching our target for this project and I have started a new project where we are purchasing a farm so we can run our programs on weekends and school holidays so we are not limited to using other venues that we can only access during the winter school holidays. For the first time we will have our own office space, our own camp site and our own facilities which is exciting for us and the children. In fact, this week we will hear if the banks will loan us the money to move forward.

I am also reigniting a project from last year that of training 8 youth in artisan skills of painting, tiling, simple wood work, cabinet making etc so they can assist pensioners in their areas with donated support but also earn a small amount to support their studies.

Over the past 4 months we have held 15 Environmental Education Camps training over 1,000 scouts aged between 11-18yrs on various topics such as: alternative fuel sources, climate change, sustainable agriculture, biodiversity and water cycle. Many children had not been camping before and it was a real highlight for the year as they returned to their villages so conscious of the need to protect their fragile environments that the children have become eco-warriors in their schools and homes.

• Dzunisani S. male (15) “Food for life (sustainable agriculture) helps with food security and we wont have to buy vegetables anymore, I will have my own garden and if I make a big garden I can also sell and get money that way."


• Nhlamulo N. female (16)” I have learned how it is important to keep yourself clean and always wash your hands before you touch food especially as a future mother. Climate change I learnt how global warming destroys the ozone layer which protects us from the uv rays. So I have learned that we should limit the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation.”

The children also learnt leadership skills, small group management, co-operative governance and woven throughout all of this they had fun. We were supported by our Rovers (18-26yr olds) who assisted in running the seminars, games and general management. What was also exciting was that for the first time ever our adult staff stepped up and ran the camps without relying on myself or other senior staff, making the whole organization much more sustainable and less dependent.

None of this would have been possible without your support. We are very excited about 2015 and the continued improvement we are bringing to the lives of the children we work with. Thank you for partnering with us. Thank you for supporting the work we are doing. If we raise $3,0000 through 30 unique donors we will be eligable for a bonus prize of $2,000. Please consider helping us reach this target and making your money 30% more valuable to us.

Camp Stove
Camp Stove
Working through the activity book
Working through the activity book
Paper ball fuel as an alternative fuel source
Paper ball fuel as an alternative fuel source

Links:

This postcard is written by Chi Nguyen, our In-the-Field Representative for Southern Africa. Chi is traveling to the nine countries of Southern Africa, visiting and assisting our partner organizations, for the first half of 2014.

On Tuesday, April 15th, I had the privilege of visiting Keep the Dream196 in Tzaneen, South Africa, and was pleasantly surprised to witness the immense amount of changes KTD strives to achieve in the community. KTD works with over 2000 kids every week in 65 different villages in Tzaneen. They work to instill physical, social, emotional, and spiritual confidence in the children, with the Children's Rights framework in mind. They strive to lead the children away from alcohol and drug abuse, sexual promiscuity, and other behaviors that may be harmful to their futures. Louise of KTD informed me that the shabeens (local pubs) do not enforce any kind of age restriction in admitting their customers, and so it was not an uncommon sight to find children at the age of 9, 10, and 11 helping themselves to a drink or two, three, or four in a local pub. KTD works to instill discipline and integrity into the children they work with to discourage this behavior and to encourage healthier behaviors that can contribute to their futures instead, such as doing their homework together, recycling and keeping their community clean, and working together to improve their communities whichever way they can.

This discipline is evident in the way the children conduct themselves. The day I came to visit, they were all good posture, good manners, and efficient movement along their activities for the day. They first engaged in a steam-release actiivty, where they all played a quick game outside to release some of their excitement before proceeding with the rest of the day's activities. They then reconvened back inside, out of the unforgiving sun's heat, to learn about the importance of recycling and keeping the community clean. Throughout it all, they demonstrated their mantra of being children who are "clear in word, in thought, and in deed."

Keep the Dream196 involves the parents of the children as well - on the walls of the classroom, you could see charts on which the parents had brainstormed during their last parent committee meeting. These parent committees and groups help remove traditional roadblocks in parental attitudes towards children, sensitizing them to their children's needs. They learn how to show their children that they love them, and they learn how to keep an open mind in the new sources of information and learnings their children bring home with them from school every day, even if these learnings may contradict their traditional beliefs in subjects such as HIV/AIDS.

The program ended that day with the children receiving chocolate Easter eggs from a local preparatory school. Delighted, the children ripped off the wrapping and enjoyed their treat after a long day of lessons - a treat well-earned.

Ronny Sekwela investing other Scouts
Ronny Sekwela investing other Scouts

Firstly on behalf of all at Keep the Dream 196 I would like to say a heartfelt thank you for your contributions and support of our organisation over the years. Thanks to you we have been able to offer 2,456 children support.
Imagine if the contribution you made to Keep the Dream196 could automatically double?


Imagine that your contribution could result in double the impact?
Well, you don’t have to imagine, it is actually possible!


An anonymous donor has contacted Global Giving and is committed to MATCHING every new monthly donor donation that is made to Keep the Dream196 during the month of December.


Its no secret, the tough economic times have taken their toll on NGO’s all over South Africa and Keep the Dream196 is no exception. We are 10 years old this year and are determined to keep our organization alive! We are actively focused on ensuring a sustainable source of income for Keep the Dream196 through monthly giving, this is where you come in, and we simply cannot do it without you.


For just $10 you allow a child to participate in our program for One whole year. This will allow the children of Limpopo a chance to live a good and a fruitful life.


So who am I helping?


Meet Ronny Sekwela who joined us at aged 12yrs and is now 22years old (ADD IN A PICTURE OF RONNY)
Ronny Before he joined the Keep the Dream196 Scouts programme he had the following to say about himself “ I was a terrible young man. My friends and I used to beat other children for no good reason. The worst thing about me is I was a great gambling animal. I would steal any of my parent’s cents and rob out their change when they would send me to stores or shops so I could gamble with the money. I also slept with many girlfriends”

Ronny now – “So Keep the Dream196 has changed my life completely as I am away from these hectic things I was doing in the past. My future without Keep The Dream196 was learning to smoke and dying of AIDS or being shot as a thief”. Ronny is now the chairman of Marula Rover Crew and works for Momentum after an internship with IBM following completion of a Bachelors of computer science. Ronny was also chosen as South Africa’s Community Builder of the Year in 2010 and sent to India for 10 days where he was selected as World Youth Community Builder because of his Community Work through Keep The Dream196.

If Keep the Dream196 can no longer exist, it means that 2,456 children just like Ronny may not have the opportunity to experience and live their inherent potential.
All you have to do is click on the followiong link and select “monthly recurring”tab and make the pledge.


https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/keepthedream-empowering-children-as-leaders-of-tomorrow/

Ronny Sekwela - Rover
Ronny Sekwela - Rover

Links:

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Organization

Keep The Dream196

Modjadjiskloof, Limpopo, South Africa
http://www.keepthedream196.com

Project Leader

Louise Batty

Modjadjiskloof, Limpopo South Africa

Where is this project located?

Map of Lifeskills for 2,743 children in South Africa