Give a Girl a Goat, Keep Her in School

 
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Your gift is helping Encise stay in school!
Your gift is helping Encise stay in school!

Your gift of a goat is ensuring girls in Haiti, like Encise (pictured above) stay in school – thank you!

If Encise looks familiar to you, it’s because her photo was used in Global Giving’s matching donation campaign. She’s also on the cover of our Global Gift Guide this year! We thought it would be fun to share her story with you.

Encise is well-known to our staff in Haiti and others in her community because of her success in school – thanks to gifts like yours that provide goats for girls in Haiti. At 15, she’s in 7th grade this year and studying hard. Next year, she’ll attend high school in a nearby town.

“I want to be a nurse,” shared Encise, “so I can help people who have sicknesses.”

Encise’s goat has given birth several times – to two kid goats each time! She sold the first two goats at the market in town and earned enough to pay for school this year. She has kept two more kid goats “in the bank,” ready to sell when needed.

Goats are the most common small animal in rural Haiti and therefore are in high demand. Students like Encise are able to raise the goat that has been given to them and then sell the offspring to help pay for school—tuition, uniforms, books, and supplies.

Your gift of a goat for a girl in Haiti is helping her stay in school, changing her future, and the future of her entire community.

Encise with her goat in front of her home in Haiti
Encise with her goat in front of her home in Haiti
Encise wit her mom and sister.
Encise wit her mom and sister.
Manoucha shows off her beautiful smile
Manoucha shows off her beautiful smile

Balancing demands at home and at school is not easy for girls in Haiti.  Often girls are expected to help with collecting water, cooking and cleaning at home, while also excelling in the classroom. 

Manoucha, who lives in the village of Crabier, is an example of a young woman who has faced challenges yet continues to move forward.  In addition to the challenges typically faced by girls in Haiti she has also battled persistent health issues in recent years which have kept her out of school and at home.

Therefore, Manoucha is a little old for her grade at school.  As a 20-year-old she is in the same grade as her 16-year-old sister, Dieunike. 

“Now I am well but sometimes I still get sick which means I cannot go to school or work at home,” Manoucha said.

It hasn’t been an easy road however she was able to begin school this year on time, for the second year in a row, and is now only two years away from graduating high school!

“I choose to keep giving effort at school so that I can one day help my family,” she said.  “I want to study to become a nurse because I like this.  Then if someone in my family is sick I can help them.”

Manoucha is already finding ways to help her family.  Her goat, which she received in the summer of 2013, gave offspring and she gave one of her goat’s kids to her sister Dieunike so she can also benefit.   The gift of one goat has a multiplying effect within this family.  It is encouraging to see Manoucha continue to persevere despite her challenges.

We’re hard at work this school year distributing goats and providing husbandry training to girls like Manoucha who live in southern Haiti due to your generosity and support.  So thank you!

Manoucha walks home in Crabier, a seaside village
Manoucha walks home in Crabier, a seaside village
Manoucha with her sisters Dieunika and Nadine
Manoucha with her sisters Dieunika and Nadine
Dieunika and her goat
Dieunika and her goat
Fania and her goat in the school yard
Fania and her goat in the school yard

In the rural community of Mersan in southern Haiti there is a primary school called Ecole Mixte Bon Berger.  Since 2012 World Concern has partnered with this school by providing goats and husbandry training to students.  With a goat students are able to earn an income by selling the goat’s offspring and using the money to pay for school tuition and other supplies. 

One of these students in Mersan is named Fania Bien-Aime, a shy 14-year-old girl who has a smile that is hard to forget.  She lives a 15 minute walk from the school with her parents and six siblings.  “I always walk to school.  In the beginning it was difficult but now it is easy.” 

Fania recently received a goat from World Concern and participated in the training where she learned how to take care of her goat and how to maintain its health. 

“I know how to take care of the goat because I learned some things in the training,” she said.  “When it’s raining I have to shelter the goat but usually during the day it sits in the shade because the sun is too hot.”

Now her goat is in heat and Fania expects it to become pregnant shortly. 

When working with communities, the ‘long view’ must be taken into consideration.  There may be solutions that would provide temporary assistance to Fania, however this lacks sustainability and requires a handout to be given repeatedly.  World Concern is interested instead in long term solutions. 

A goat is a treasured asset in rural Haiti because it represents a steady income.  “Each year a goat can give between six and nine kids, and she may produce kids for up to 10 years,” explains Pierre Duclona, World Concern’s regional coordinator for southern Haiti. 

While a goat and relevant training may not produce immediate results, it will provide students like Fania with a way to earn an income for years to come and give her new skills which she can carry into adulthood.    

Fania will soon begin the 6th grade and is looking forward to returning to class after the summer break.

“The sciences and mathematics are the ones I like.  I like to study,” she shared.  “Education is important so I can help my parents and also for myself to feel good and help in society.” 

“I would like to be a tailor but I can’t sew right now.  For now this is the profession that is in my head,” explained Fania.  “You can get money from this skill because when school begins, parents need to send their children’s uniforms to get sewed.”

With a goat and specific training, Fania is well-positioned to earn an income and therefore continue with her education which will give her opportunities to provide for herself and her family.  Thank you so much for your generosity and partnership in keeping girls like Fania in school! 

Fania with a friend
Fania with a friend
Fania
Fania's goat receives vaccines
Mr. Amazan and his youngest daughter, Rose.
Mr. Amazan and his youngest daughter, Rose.

Written on the side of the house belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Nocolas Amazan are the words, “God is leading my house.”  This family continues to rely on God for their strength and hope, but the gift of a goat helped them meet some important physical needs. 

Your gift of a goat is impacting lives just like this family.

The Amazan family lives in a tiny village in southern Haiti called Morency.  They have three daughters—Francise, Nehemie and Rose.  In 2006, Francise, who is the oldest daughter, received a goat from World Concern.  The following year Nehemie also received a goat.  In addition to the gift of a goat, the girls were given training on how to manage and care for their goat.

In rural Haiti a goat is an important source of income.  Baby goats can be easily sold in local markets.  By giving girls a goat and training, they have the opportunity to earn an income which can be used to pay for school and potentially much more, as you will see in the Amazan family.

“The goat program is a blessing coming directly from God,” said Mr. Amazan.  “The goats were the most important revenue for my family.”

Mr. Amazan shared that once his daughter’s goats gave offspring, some were sold to pay for Francise and Nehemie’s high school education in Les Cayes, a city nearby, where they are currently studying.

Sometimes the income earned from a goat can also encourage other economic opportunities within the family.  The Amazan family decided to use some of the income they earned from selling the offspring to build a stove so they could bake bread and sell it to the community.  The stove is still functioning and providing the Amazan family with yet another source of income. 

The gift of a goat and training can equip a girl with the resources and knowledge needed to succeed educationally and personally.  And in some families, like the Amazans, the impact often goes beyond the girl herself and also helps her whole family. 

Thank you for making a difference in the life of a girl—and her family—with the gift of a goat!

The Amazan family
The Amazan family's stove where they bake bread
Rosemena with her goat in Morency
Rosemena with her goat in Morency

For Rosemena, the gift of a single goat 11 years ago enabled her to pursue her dream of becoming a medical technician.  In 2003, Rosemena–now a confident 29-year-old woman—received a goat and training from World Concern while attending the community school in her home village of Morency, a tiny, poor community along the southern coast of Haiti. 

Equipped not only with a goat, but more importantly, the knowledge of how to care for and manage the goat, Rosemena was given the opportunity to earn an income to help her pay for school. In rural Haiti, goats and other animals are valuable assets and often represent the primary source of income for families.      

Since 2003 Rosemena’s goat has given her a total of 21 kid goats, sometimes as many as three at a time! During high school she sold some of the offspring to pay for school fees, books, and clothes.  Following high school she wanted to attend college to become a medical technician.  This meant moving to the largest town in her region—a bold move for a young woman. 

To support her higher education she sold many of her goat’s offspring that she had taken care of over the years.  Rosemena is now in her last year of study and will graduate with her degree this year.  What an amazing accomplishment!

“I attribute all of this to the goat program,” she said. 

Rosemena’s dream of becoming a medical technician was made possible by the generous gift of one goat.  This important work continues today.  With your help we’re providing girls in Haiti like Rosemena with a goat and training to keep them in school and equip them to live healthy and productive lives.  Thank you for your support!

Rosemena
Rosemena's beautiful smile

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Organization

World Concern

Seattle, WA, United States
http://www.worldconcern.org

Project Leader

Cathy Herholdt

Seattle, WA United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Give a Girl a Goat, Keep Her in School