Solar Lights for Burma

 
$8,455
$3,545
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Sep 15, 2014

Solar Training for People with Disabilities

Participants learn to measure voltage and current
Participants learn to measure voltage and current

U YE

Through a mutual friend, I met U Ye, a well known activist for people with disabilities in the Mandalay area. When he learned that I gave solar trainings, he immediately requested one for a special group, principally made up of people with disabilities.It is a testament to U Ye's organizing abilities that he was able to bring 25 people from Mandalay and Mogok to Pyin Oo Lwin and to house them and feed them for the 5 days of the PV solar course. U Ye himself is disabled, but this does not affect his tireless work on behalf of disadvantaged people.

AUNG MYINT (*)

As usual, I needed a translator, and Seya Peter, the Director of the Lisu Theologiocal Seminary and fervent organic gardening activist, was kind enough to fill that role for the first two days. When Peter left to teach an organic class elsewhere, one of the participants volunteered to translate, this was Aung Myint. Due to his disability, he lived at home with his parents in a small village near Shwebo and despite his Bachelor's degree in Physics, he was unable to find a job of any kind. In Burma, people with disabilities find it almost impossible to secure employment, even if they are very qualified.

Aung Myint did a good job on the translating and he was obviously so very motivated to to find employment that I determined to help him in that search. I had previously visited the "School for the Needy Blind", located in a monastery on the edge of Pyin Oo Lwin and I thought that might be a place that could use Aung Myint's talents. After a short interview with the Abbot and founder of the monatery, it was agreed that Aung Myint would take on the position of Teacher of English and Physics. I agreed to pay his salary, $100 per month, for the first year and then we would see. Aung Myint was transformed - this was his first job, his first salary, and it gave him a way to be independent of his parents and even send back part of his salary to them. The latest report is that Aung Myint is very happy in his new position and I'm hoping he will find useful the book on Physics I have bought to give to in December.

WHEELCHAIRS

Several of our participants needed wheelchairs to move around on and one of them had actually installed a battery propulsion system that worked reasonably well. He had put together the battey, charger, controller and motor from parts that were made for an electric bicycle. This demonstration creativity and technical ability inspired me to commit to a project to electrify the wheel chairs of the disabled in Mandalay and Mogok. U Ye wants each wheelchair to have it's own onboard solar charging set up. We will see what can be done, as solar panels are large and their power output is low.

CERTIFICATES

After studying hard, six hours a day, for five days, the participants were given Certificates of Completion. Everyone was delighted with the class and promised "never to forget their solar teacher". Burmese people are very respectful towards teachers and older people, so I reap great rewards on both counts!

 (*) Aung Myint is an invented name to protect the identity of this recipient

Pumping water directly with solar panels
Pumping water directly with solar panels
Aung Myint receives his Cerficate of Completion
Aung Myint receives his Cerficate of Completion
The class, with U Ye, in white trousers, front row
The class, with U Ye, in white trousers, front row
Aung Myint, with safety helmet - just in case!
Aung Myint, with safety helmet - just in case!
A student checks the flow of the solar pump
A student checks the flow of the solar pump
Jun 20, 2014

Solar Lights for Emmanuel Orphanage

Earlier this year Solar Roots was invited to come to Kayamyo in western Sagaing Region to install a solar system at Emmanuel Orphanage Center. The Center was founded 3 years ago by Pastor Joel and he runs it with his wife and his parents. There are many orphaned kids up in the border area close to India and Joel hopes to be able to take in more and more as time goes on.Right now they are constrained by lack of funding. Previous to our arrival, the Orphanage depended on power supplied by a local generator, who charged $2 per month per light, for only 2 hours of service per day. Kayalmyo, being a remote border town, is not well supported by the central government, especially in the area of energy. There are no official gas stations and all fuel is sold on the black market from small roadside vendors. Since the government doesn't offer regular electricity supply, almost every second house has a solar system - the highest market penetration for solar I had ever seen in Burma. So it was a breeze to pick up the 300Watt panel, a great solar battery from India and all the parts we needed, including 18 LED lights, that fairly lit the place up.

I am still in Burma and the internet is too slow to upload photos, so to see some images and to read a Blog written by Hamish Lee, our New Zealand voluteer, place go to this link: http://leesmission.blogspot.com/

Thank you for your continued support,

Bruce

Mar 27, 2014

Light and Energy to Brighten Burma's Future

The following is a postcard from Charissa Murphy, GlobalGiving's In-the-Field Representative in Southeast Asia, about her recent visit to Solar Roots in Myanmar.

Lights. Energy. Heat. Hot water. Cooked food. Clean water. Critical thinking. Preventive maintenance. Knowledge sharing. Experimentation. Community advancement. Sustainability. These are just some of the resulting benefits of the trainings that Solar Roots provides to the communities within Burma, focusing on community sustainability.

Enthusiastic to learn, the 20 participants (monks, monastic teachers, and a few local residents) joined together for a 10 day training with Solar Roots on clay oven building and Photovoltaic solar panel training at a monastery in Taunggyi, the capital of the Shan State. Bruce, the founder of Solar Roots, highlighted that the enthusiasm in Myanmar to learn is incredibly inspiring. Koh So, an environmental activist and local resident of Taunggyi, really exemplified the motivation within the community to not only learn and experiment, but to also share that knowledge with others too! He really took a lead in building and experimenting with both the clay oven and the solar energy trainings. Koh So also supported Bruce by translating for the others and building connections to what Bruce taught so that everyone understood well and was involved. It's uplifting to see how involved they were! 

The participants learned to build a rocket stove, which is essentially an L-shaped oven with a chimney where wood is fed in from the bottom of the wood. The stove that Bruce introduced burns wood more efficiently, produces less smoke, and creates a very strong amount of heat. All of the materials used were locally sourced (from the earth and from local product stores). 

Bruce focuses on teaching installation, preventive maintenance, and repairs. Preventive maintenance is sometimes a difficult concept to grasp in a culture that generally fixes things only when they break. To understand this, it's important to know that the education system in Myanmar is very restrictive. Freedom of thought and critical thinking are not taught. Instead, students in Myanmar are required to memorize throughout their education years, which in turn does not teach preventative monitoring. This is a reality that will change with continued opportunities such as Solar Roots' trainings, giving these eager learners practical, hands-on experience to implement the ideas they are taught and to continue sharing the knowledge to build sustainability within their communities. 

The training was a tremendous success, and Bruce looks forward to regular updates from the monks and the community members who participated to see how they're sharing and implementing the knowledge they gained! Though the challenges within Myanmar are plenty, Solar Roots is commited to helping to empower the communities that it reaches to know that there are alternatives and to provide the tools to implement and teach those applications. 

Mar 20, 2014

Solar Training in Naung Taung Monastery

Some of the  novice monks observe the training
Some of the novice monks observe the training

Recently, I was invited to give a solar training at Naung Taung monastery, near Taunggyi in southern Shan State, which is an area I hadn't visited before. The monastery is large, with over 400 novice monks and about 600 children who receive education there. Our training followed the usual pattern of familiarizing the participants with the use of the multimeter and a great deal of information about solar panels and batteries. The twenty participants came from many different monasteries where they are either monks or teachers. One of the highlights of the training was when we visited a solar system already in use in a restaurant and the students were able to diagnose some of the problems occuring there and advise the owner how to fix them. All in all, we covered alot of technical ground and the participants went away with a greatly expanded knowledge of solar electricity. I'm sure I will return to Naung Taung at some time in the future.

Participants become familar with multimeters
Participants become familar with multimeters
Some rather dirty panels that are also shaded!
Some rather dirty panels that are also shaded!
Dec 30, 2013

Solar lighting in monasteries

Novice monks at Asia Light Monastery
Novice monks at Asia Light Monastery

Having recently returned to Burma, I am presently working on my schedule for 2014. One of my main goals is to visit several monasteries to help them install solar electric systems. I have already been invited to come to a meditation center at Kanmyu, where they have an existing solar system with diesel generator back-up. However, the system is working poorly and needs some repair and upgrade.

Other visits will be to Taunggyi and Mon State. Even around Pyin Oo Lwin, where I am based, there are several monasteries, nunneries and monastic schools that could benefit from our solar lighting systems. Unfortunately, because the internet is so slow in Burma, I can't upload the photographs I had intended. I will do this on my next visa run to Thailand.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all our donors for their generous support, and wish you all the very best for the New Year. Hopefully, with your help, 2014 will be a bright solar year for Burma!

Monk and Nun at a stove  and solar training
Monk and Nun at a stove and solar training
Young novice monks at Parami monastery
Young novice monks at Parami monastery

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Organization

Solar Roots

Berkeley, CA, United States

Project Leader

Bruce Gardiner

Berkeley, CA United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Solar Lights for Burma