Himalayan Cataract Project: Remote Eye Camps

 
$56,599
$43,401
Raised
Remaining
Sep 28, 2010

Lunana Outreach Camp

Phochu River
Phochu River

Lunana is located on the bank of the Pho Chu River and it is the most remote region in Bhutan. It takes ten days walk from the nearest road and eight days from the district Headquarters. Lunana is made up of dispersed settlement with 150 households. Cold and harsh climate pervades throughout the year, with altitudes ranging from 7000 to over 8000 feet above sea level and mule tracks are the only access.

Lunana’s facilities, which include a school, a health center, and a livestock extension center, remain open from June to September and close by mid October due to heavy snowfall. Most of the people also migrate to lower nearby districts in search of manual work and also for barter trade with their yak products with necessary items like chilly, rice and others.

Before setting out for the outreach camp (OMEC), the team had to make additional preparations due to weather conditions as well as the geographical location of Lunana. Prior to the their departure, they made sure all the drugs and non-drugs items including the operating microscope were packed properly to ensure that they were small, portable and most importantly waterproof.

The ophthalmic team that set out for the OMEC consisted of one ophthalmologist and 3 ophthalmic technicians. The team left on the 10th August. Traveling in monsoon season brings many problems due to incessant rains leading to landslides, washed away bridges, falling boulders, and so on. After a day of travel, the team spent a day in the village of Damji where they provided eye care services to more than 100 patients.

On the third day of the journey, the team proceeded to halt at the base of mount Kangla Karchu to enable the crossing of the pass the following day. From there on, there was no downhill journey and the team climbed up hills after hills at high altitude. Traveling through incessant rains and winds in muddy and slippery stones took a toll on the travelers as well as the horses carrying the loads.

Late that evening the team arrived at a campsite where tents were pitched and arrangements made for the evening. That night, the ophthalmologist developed severe chest pain, and breathlessness, giddiness, headache nausea and vomiting and his condition further deteriorated the next day. The team decided to halt there for one day to give him time for acclimatization and at the same time stabilize his condition.

That evening, the doctor also showed sign of dehydration and general weakness. Due to difficult terrains, lack of communication, and adequate medical aids, a decision was made to transfer him back that night. While an attempt was made to travel on horse, it was not possible due to poor visibility, lack of strength to ride on horse and due to poor trail condition. The return mission was abandoned.

With intensive medications over the night and nourishing porridge, and glucose water, his condition showed improvement by sunrise. Weighing the pros and cons, he determined to proceed further. However, much of the remaining trip had to be made on horse. Upon the arrival of the team members and the medical loads, preparations were done for conducting the clinics. The operation theatre was set up with plastic sheets and fumigation.

More than 100 patients received treatment in Lunana and all school children were thoroughly evaluated for any ophthalmic problems. Those requiring vision restoring surgery were listed and received counseling while preoperative preparations were being done. A total of 18 patients received. All operations went successfully and the post-operative period was uneventful. Medications were explained and handed over to the patients with detailed instructions.

One of the aims of the trip was to follow-up on a corneal transplant patient. She had permanently lost her right eye years back from corneal trauma and ulceration. It had taken her relatives more than 10 days to carry her from Lunana to Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital in Thimphu, Bhutan. Due to lack of cornea, she had to stay in the hospital for more than two months before her operation. She regained her vision and she is happily tending to yaks now. At the follow-up, she was all smiles and with deep gratitude. She was very careful and understood the importance of timely medications and follow-ups. She had functional vision and her transplant had remained clear. Her medicines were refilled and she was advised to return to the hospital for a detailed assessment.

The team’s return journey proved to be very challenging. With one bridge washed away a detour had to be made to cross a lone log bridge. Climbing the slippery cliff and reaching the log bridge proved to be very demanding and at times life threatening endeavor. After facing many difficult situations and overcoming each, the team, all returned safe and sound.

Lunana Village
Lunana Village
Patient Operation
Patient Operation
Education on post-op medications and eye care
Education on post-op medications and eye care
Cataract Surgery Patient
Cataract Surgery Patient
Cataract Surgery Patient
Cataract Surgery Patient
Corneal transplant follow-up patient
Corneal transplant follow-up patient
Before Surgery
Before Surgery
Patient
Patient's eye post surgery
Jun 17, 2010

Remote Eye Camps Update.

Outreach Team on their way to an Remote Eye Camp
Outreach Team on their way to an Remote Eye Camp

On behalf of the Himalayan Cataract Project, I would like to thank you for joining us in our mission to fight curable and preventable blindness in the developing world. It is through your generous contribution that we are able to bring world-class eye care to the most remote regions of the world.

The Himalayan Cataract Project and Tilganga Institute of ophthalmology have been organizing Outreach Microsurgical Eye Clinics (OMECs) to extend eye care are services in the under served regions of Nepal and India for more than a decade.

From February 25th to 27th 2010, an OMEC was carried out at Jagadguru Kripalu Charity hospital at Managarh-UP, India. A total of 2,181 patients were examined and one doctor and five support staff performed 520 cataract surgeries.

On the 24th and 25th of March another OMEC was organized in Pakhribas in eastern Nepal. A total of 1,363 patients were examined and two surgeons performed 125 cataract surgeries.

On March 30th and 31st an OMEC was carried out in a very remote area of eastern Nepal near Kanchanjangha Mountain region. After trekking three and half days the team examined close to 1,000 patients and performed 81 cataract surgeries The Himalayan Cataract Project co-founders Dr. Geoff Tabin and Dr. Sanduk Ruit were part of the team.

Between April 20th and 22nd, Tilganga organized an OMEC in Dhobi, Ramecchap. During the two days, 554 people were screened and 89 surgeries were performed. In May, an Outreach Camp was conducted in Dolakha and after screening 408 people, 106 sight-restoring surgeries were performed.

Tilganga is planning 14 OMECs between July and December and they expect the total number of surgery to reach 3075.

Patient carried to an Eye Camp
Patient carried to an Eye Camp
Post-op. patient
Post-op. patient
Post-op. patients
Post-op. patients
Post-Op.Patients at Hetauda Community Eye Hospital
Post-Op.Patients at Hetauda Community Eye Hospital

Links:

Mar 16, 2010

Remote Outreach Eye Camps Updates

In response to your support, the HCP would like to express our sincere gratitude for your continued involvement with this project. We greatly appreciate your support in the past and hope that you’ll continue to join us in our efforts to eradicate preventable blindness.

Since 1994, a total of 68,174 sight-restoring surgeries were performed in various Remote Outreach Eye Camps (OMECs) in Nepal, India, Tibet, and Bhutan. In 2009, the HCP sponsored 7 OMECs in which 7,681 people were screened and 1347 sight restoring surgeries were performed. Between February 10th and 14th, 11 screening camps were conducted in central Nepal. As a result, 2,858 patients were examined and 581 cataract patients were selected. The following are stories from two patients:

Rajkali Dhanuka a 60-year-old woman from Bara District was very happy when she got her sight back. Before her surgery, she could only hear her grandson’s voice and she felt hurt because she couldn’t see him. She was very eager to see her grandson and she is now very pleased with Dr. Ruit and his team. She said " you (Dr. Ruit) are god, my house is temple and my son and grandsons are holly gods "

Mrs. Dhanamaya Pandey a 70-year-old woman from Makawanpur District used to care for local villagers’ goats and buffaloes daily. Due to her sight loss, she could not continue her work and she spent her days lying in a corner in her house. She heard the notice of the eye camp on local radio and she came to check up her eye, the screening team found cataract as the cause of her sight loss and brought her to the hospital. At first she declined surgery due to fear but after counseling she finally agreed. After surgery she said "if I had rejected surgery my life would be worst, now I am happy I can see every where and every one, I can continue my daily work."

Links:

Jan 25, 2007

Photos and Annual Report

Please click below to see a celebration of 2006 in photographs as well as the 2005 Annual Report from Himalayan Cataract Project.


Attachments:
Jul 15, 2005

Photo Update

Monks at the eye clinic. Photo by Chryl Martin.
Monks at the eye clinic. Photo by Chryl Martin.


Attachments:

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Organization

Project Leader

Geoff Tabin

Director
Waterbury, VT United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Himalayan Cataract Project: Remote Eye Camps