Helping Babies Breathe

 
$1,565
$198,435
Raised
Remaining
Apr 29, 2013

Helping Babies Breathe Report Update April 2013

Helping Babies Breathe® Project Report                                        April 2013

We have very exciting news to share about HBB this period.  The February issue of Pediatrics contained
very positive outcome data.  A two-year study of 78,000 births in Tanzania indicated a 47% reduction in early
neonatal deaths and a 24% reduction in fresh stillbirths after HBB training.  Additionally, a smaller study
in India resulted in a 48% reduction in fresh stillbirths after HBB training.  Several sources have carried the very positive news of this ground-breaking initiative that is spreading rapidly throughout Africa, Asia and Latin America.  Partners have reported that HBB was mentioned in approximately 90% of the presentations at the Global Newborn Health Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa at the time of this writing.


Reporting at the March HBB Global Development Alliance (GDA) call resulted in confirmation of over 100,000 providers trained in HBB.  In less than 2½ years, HBB has been reported in 54 countries, 16 of which have national plans supported by the government.  Many interesting can be seen at Stories from the Field on the HBB Website. 

Planning for the next Kenya Stakeholder meeting is underway.  We hope to be able to coordinate the meeting
with the regional International Confederation of Midwives Conference in Nairobi in mid-July, as several of our stakeholders will already be present.  We hope to come away from that meeting with a more comprehensive action plan for all of Kenya. 


The AAP and our many HBB implementing partners continue to appreciate the generosity of all those who have supported the HBB initiative.  Please feel free to contact us at hbb@aap.org if you have any ideas to spread the
word about HBB.


Submitted by Eileen Hopkins Schoen, Manager, Helping Babies Breathe
Initiative, American Academy of Pediatrics.

Jan 16, 2013

December 2012 HBB Report

Helping Babies Breathe® Project Report                               December 2012

 

Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) continues rapid implementation, particularly throughout Eastern Africa.  It has been introduced into 51 countries now, 21 of which are supported by USAID.  Of these countries, about 10 have developed national rollout plans.

 

Our many partners have supported the training of at least 98,000 health providers since the launch in June 2010.  Preliminary data from one country in Africa shows a 45% decline in newborn deaths from birth asphyxia.  The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has continues to work on their impact evaluation of HBB in Kenya.  We look forward to positive results from that study.

 

Notable accomplishments for this period include:

  • Planning for a stakeholder meeting in the spring is underway, thanks to the support of Johnson and Johnson. The AAP continues to strive for consensus with all country stakeholders to develop a plan for country-wide scale up.
  • Dr Sherri Bucher, Principal Investigator for the educational validation of HBB in Eldoret has recently received approval for a grant from the Laerdal Foundation – “Using mobile phones to support neonatal resuscitation training in Africa.” Sherri has the support of the National Resuscitation Council of Kenya and is committed to the advancement of HBB training throughout the country.
  • John Wachira, Chairman of the Resuscitation Council of Kenya, is working to engage the Ministry of Health and Sanitation to support implementation of HBB and Essential Newborn Care; however, efforts are stalled due to the upcoming election in March 2013.  We hope to have further commitment from the new administration.

 

The AAP and our many HBB implementing partners continue to appreciate the generosity of all those who have supported the HBB initiative.  Please feel free to contact us at hbb@aap.org if you have any ideas to spread the word about HBB. 

 

 

Submitted by Eileen Hopkins Schoen, Manager, Helping Babies Breathe Initiative, American Academy of Pediatrics.

Oct 11, 2012

Helping Babies Breathe Report Update

Helping Babies Breathe® Project Report                                        July 2012


Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) continues rapid implementation,
particularly throughout Eastern Africa.  It has been introduced into 48 countries now,
21 of which are supported by USAID.  HBB
has been introduced in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, 
Cambodia, East Timor, India, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Mongolia, Pakistan,
Thailand, Angola, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia,
Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Malawi, Mozambique, Morocco, Namibia,
Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia,
Zimbabwe, Georgia, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador,
Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, and
Trinidad/Tobago. Of these countries, about 10 have developed national rollout
plans.


Our many partners have supported the training of at least 80,000
health providers since the launch in June 2010. 
Preliminary data from one country in Africa shows a 45% decline in
newborn deaths from birth asphyxia.  The
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
has begun their impact evaluation of HBB in Kenya.  We look forward to positive results from that
study.


Notable accomplishments for this period include:

  • At the Child Survival Call to Action forum
    convened by the Governments of the United States, India, and Ethiopia, and
    organized in close collaboration with UNICEF, a global roadmap
    advocated for five strategic shifts, including targeting neonatal conditions,
    to end preventable child deaths.
  • In collaboration with the UN Commission on Life Saving Commodities for
    Women and Children, Global Development Alliance (GDA) partners analyzed the global
    landscape on status, needs,
    and constraints regarding resuscitation devices (bag and mask, suction bulbs),
    and submitted recommendations
    to increase access to them. 
    Resuscitation devices are one of 13 commodities that have been
    identified by the UN Commission as essential but under-utilized. 
  • HBB was voted by Women Deliver as one
    of 50 most inspiring ideas
    and solutions. 
    More than 6,000 people voted
    from around the world.
  • Members of the GDA participated in an expert
    technical consultation convened by the WHO to review and update the Basic Newborn Resuscitation Guidelines.  TheAAP response to the guidelines and how they apply to HBB can be found on www.helpingbabiesbreathe.org  
  • In an interview with Forbes, the USAID Administrator, Dr. Rajiv Shah, cited the
    HBB GDA as one of the most effective partnerships that USAID has entered into.
  • A primary resource for HBB facilitators, the HBB
    Facilitator Video is now available for free access on www.helpingbabiesbreathe.org


The AAP and our many HBB implementing partners continue to
appreciate the generosity of all those who have supported the HBB
initiative.  Please feel free to contact
us at hbb@aap.org if you have any ideas to
spread the word about HBB. 

 

Submitted by Eileen
Hopkins Schoen, Manager, Helping Babies Breathe Initiative, American Academy
of Pediatrics.

Apr 29, 2012

Helping Babies Breathe Report April 2012

Helping Babies Breathe® Project Report                     April 2012

 

Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) continues rapid implementation, particularly throughout Eastern Africa.  It has been introduced into 34 countries with 23 of these having support from USAID.  Our many partners have supported the training of at least 58,000 health providers since the launch in June 2010.  Preliminary data from one country in Africa shows a significant decline in newborn deaths.  Watch the Lancet for a soon to be published article that will cite specific data.

 

Other accomplishments for this quarter include recognition from the WHO Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (PMNCH).  They consider HBB to be one of the evidence-based essential interventions.  In addition, the African Union Commission included newborn resuscitation and other newborn indicators in the Monitoring and Evaluation Indicator Reference Guide for annual tracking from member countries.

 

Our advocacy efforts have resulted in the UN Commission on Life-saving Commodities for Women’s and Children’s Health to identify resuscitation devices as one of the nine essential commodities that must receive increased attention.  Increasing the availability of equipment for learning and practice will make it easier to conduct HBB training, and will ultimately save more babies from birth asphyxia.

 

A primary resource for HBB facilitators, the HBB Implementation Guide, is now available for download on the HBB Web site.  The Helping Babies Breathe Facilitator Video was finalized just this month and will soon be available for free access on www.helpingbabiesbreathe.org

 

Looking forward in 2012, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development recently secured multi-million dollar funding for an impact evaluation of HBB in India and Kenya.  The Kenya study will kick off later this year.  Let’s also give a shout-out to Johnson and Johnson for their support of HBB in Kenya!  The AAP will begin partnering with J&J on a stakeholder meeting and HBB training efforts later this year

 

The AAP and our many HBB implementing partners continue to appreciate the generosity of all those who have supported the HBB initiative.  Please feel free to contact us at hbb@aap.org if you have any ideas to spread the word about HBB. 

 

 

Submitted by Eileen Hopkins Schoen, Manager, Helping Babies Breathe Initiative, American Academy of Pediatrics.

Dec 27, 2011

Helping Babies Breathe Report December 2011

Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) has really been in the spotlight this season!  In October, the HBB Global Development Alliance was awarded the 2011 Alliance Excellence Award from USAID for a partnership strategy to rollout HBB globally.  In November, HBB education was highlighted in an ABC Nightline episode, and just recently, the Million Mom’s campaign aired a video about the initiative in Kenya.

Global progress continues.  HBB has been introduced into 34 countries now and at least 10 of those countries have developed national rollout plans.  Partners have supported the training of at least 33,000 health providers since the launch in June 2010.  Preliminary data from one country in Africa shows a significant decline in newborn deaths.

Some progress more specific to Kenya…

More than 1,200 health providers have been trained so far.  The Ministry of Health is leading efforts to include HBB in Kenya’s national guidelines for pediatric emergency care.  Kenya is slated to be the site of an upcoming evaluation of the impact of HBB on perinatal mortality that will kick off in 2012.

We’d like to share an excerpt from a blog by Sherri Bucher, PhD, Assistant Professor of Research in the Department of Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr Bucher works with Riley Children’s Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya, where HBB was first introduced.

Nurse Mary Wekesa cleared Baby Job’s airway by suctioning thick mucus from his mouth and nose. She dried him vigorously, cut the umbilical cord, and transferred the limp newborn to a dry blanket. As Mary worked to revive the unresponsive infant, Emily asked repeatedly if her baby was dead. Emily’s mother, who witnessed Job’s birth, sobbed inconsolably. Josephine Wanyama, a hospital technician assisting Mary, whispered, “This baby will die. It’s not breathing.”

Mary responded, “Let us try. This kid might come back.” Mary wrapped the motionless baby in the dry blanket, leaving his chest exposed. She placed a circular rubber mask over his bluish mouth and nose and squeezed a bulb-like attachment that made his chest rise and fall as air inflated his lungs. Mary instructed Josephine to use the newborn’s umbilical stump to monitor his heart rate. Josephine counted each pulse out loud. Every heart beat signaled hope.

Suddenly, the loud cries of baby Job rang through the maternity ward. His grandmother’s sobs were replaced by shouts of joy. Job began to breathe on his own thanks to the efforts of Mary and Josephine, who were able to respond because they received proper training and had all of the necessary equipment.

Emily was able to leave Bokoli Hospital carrying Baby Job in her arms, and happily began making plans and dreaming about a bright future for her new family.

A sincere thank you goes out to all those who have supported the HBB initiative, whether it be from your wallet or through your heart.  Please feel free to contact us if you have any ideas to spread the word about HBB.  Kenya is a very large country and continued support will be needed to save more newborn lives.

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Organization

American Academy of Pediatrics

Elk Grove Village, IL, United States
http://www.aap.org/

Project Leader

Eileen Schoen

Manager, Helping Babies Breathe Initiative
Elk Grove Village, IL United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Helping Babies Breathe