Help Typhoon Haiyan survivors in the Philippines

 
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Nov 20, 2014

One year after Typhoon Haiyan: Progress report and thank you

Mercy Corps Emergency Response - Typhoon Haiyan
Mercy Corps Emergency Response - Typhoon Haiyan

Just over a year ago, Typhoon Haiyan, swept across the Philippines leaving chaos and destruction in its path. More than 6,000 people lost their lives and 4.1 million people were uprooted from their homes.

When you learned about how this storm had impacted communities and families, you donated to support emergency response relief and recovery efforts - Thank you! Your generosity has made a real impact on the lives of Filipino families.

In the first weeks after Typhoon Haiyan, Mercy Corps coordinated with with partners and provided food, water and emergency supplies such as blankets, soap, and shelter materials to more than 18,000 people. Mercy Corps' emergency response focused on communities that had received little or no aid and those living in remote areas. In addition, Mercy Corps established two child-safe spaces to help children process fear and trauma. In addition, with your support the organization worked with partners to improve water and sanitation services for 5,000 people living on remote islands – building toilets and hand-washing facilities in schools, repairing community wells and providing water filters.

Mercy Corps knows that even as emergency response teams were helping survivors meet their immediate needs, they must also begin the work of longer-term recovery and rebuilding. It became clear that survivors had an accute need for money so early 2014 Mercy Corps launched an emergency cash assistance program. The assistance provided families the resources to begin their own recovery process, depending on their needs and priorities – to buy food, repair their homes, and restart their businesses.

One of the first individuals to sign up for the cash assistance program was Florida Go, pictured below. Florida and her husband Realino Go were lucky to emerge from the devastating storm alive, but like millions of others, found their world destroyed. Their only source of income — the humble candymaking business they ran out of their kitchen — was wiped away. With cash assistance they were able to get their business back up and running. Watch their inspiring story here.

In partnership with BanKO, a microfinance bank in the Philippines, recovery teams made electronic cash transfers through mobile phones to 25,500 families, like the Gos. For many families, the mobile accounts are the first formal bank accounts they have ever had access to, and the accounts allow them to store, spend and save their money. Many recipients have used the funds to rebuild after the storm and some families have managed to accrue some savings, a small but important safety net for future crises.

Thank you again for bringing help and hope to Typhoon Haiyan survivors!

 

After the disaster: Emergency food and supplies
After the disaster: Emergency food and supplies
After the disaster: Safe spaces for children
After the disaster: Safe spaces for children
Moving forward:Improved water & sanitation service
Moving forward:Improved water & sanitation service

Links:

Aug 20, 2014

Helping Typhoon survivors build a stronger future

Thank you for supporting survivors like Casimira
Thank you for supporting survivors like Casimira

When Typhoon Haiyan made landfall last November, Casimira Amoren Asidto, 33, was holding a wake for her husband, who had passed away from acute appendicitis a few days earlier.

Outside her house, gusts of wind were tearing through the village, snapping trees in half and whipping debris into the air. By 9 a.m., the walls of her house had begun to collapse. After the storm, Casimira and her children moved in with her parents and in the early days relied on emergency water and food distributed by aid organizations.

Now a single mother with four children under the age of eleven, Casimira knew that supporting her family would be a struggle. The sporadic income she earned from selling fish at the local market was insufficient for rebuilding her home and sending her children to school, much less for expanding her business.

But thanks to your compassion and support, Casimira and others like her now have hope for the future. Your donations have provided thousands of Filipinos with the opportunity to rebuild their lives better, stronger and more resilient than ever.

In January, Casimira became one of the first people to register for Mercy Corps’ mobile-money transfer program, which uses mobile technology to provide recovery funds to families hit hardest by the storm.

Many people across the Philippines’ 7,000 islands live on less than $2 USD per day, and 80 percent of them lack access to brick-and-mortar banking services. In such precarious financial circumstances, finding the money to rebuild after a massive disaster like Haiyan can be a daunting task.

That’s why Mercy Corps partnered with BanKO, the Philippines’ first mobile-based bank, to connect 25,000 families like Casimira’s with cash transfers through mobile savings accounts.

The transfers provide urgent funds to families working to rebuild their homes and livelihoods, and the spending boosts the economy, which helps the entire region recover more quickly.

Casimira decided to use the first of her three cash transfers to make a down payment on a plot of land near her mother’s house, on which she will eventually build a new home.

And when she receives the remaining two cash transfers, she wants to leave them in her savings account to earn interest, pay her children’s school fees and save in case of an emergency.

Because of your support, Mercy Corps has been able to bring hope to those hardest hit by Typhoon Haiyan. Casimira is optimistic and sincerely grateful for the support her family has received.

“Thank you that you have come into my life. You have helped me so much, helped me move on,” she told us. “Thank you for teaching me how to plan for the future, how to plan for my children’s future and for helping me put them through school. My life now has direction.”

Casimira sells fish at a local market
Casimira sells fish at a local market
Casimira
Casimira's 7-year-old son and niece

Links:

May 19, 2014

Do you know what "daghang salamat" means?

Devastation from Typhoon Haiyan
Devastation from Typhoon Haiyan

In the six months since the devastating storm tore through the Philippines, your generosity has helped more than 140,000 people survive the chaos of disaster and begin putting their lives back together. 

Thanks to you, families in the hardest-hit areas received: 

•  Food, clean water and hygiene supplies immediately after the storm

•  Safe spaces for their children to recover from trauma

•  Tools, materials and financial assistance to help survivors rebuild homes and businesses

Today, because of your support, children are sleeping under new roofs. Fishermen are repairing their boats. Parents are reopening their family businesses. 

We know recovery from a disaster of this scale takes time. In the aftermath of a crisis there is an opportunity to build back better. That’s why, with your support, we’re working to improve access to clean water and mobile banking in underserved Filipino communities. We’re focused on ensuring thousands of vulnerable families have what they need to rebuild now and meet their needs for years to come. See photos  

The courage and determination of the Filipino people to move forward is extraordinary. And your kindness in their moment of greatest need is a source of great hope for the future. As Anna says, our work would not be possible without you.

Daghang salamat. Thank you.

Typhoon Haiyan survivor
Typhoon Haiyan survivor
Child friendly spaces in the Philippines
Child friendly spaces in the Philippines
Businesses reopen in the Philippines
Businesses reopen in the Philippines
Financial services offered by Mercy Corps
Financial services offered by Mercy Corps

Links:

Feb 19, 2014

Rebuilding for Baby Yolee

You
You've given Hazel and her family a reason to hope

I want to share with you a miraculous story of survival. 

Just hours before Typhoon Haiyan crashed into tiny Kinatarcan Island in the Philippines, 24-year-old Hazel was giving birth at the local health center. When the storm descended she knew they were in danger. She bravely forced herself from her hospital bed and ran with her newborn in her arms. 

She found shelter in a house, but winds ripped the roof off as she huddled in a corner, clutching her baby. At times, she was certain they wouldn’t survive. After the storm, her husband and their 3-year-old daughter were overcome with relief when they found Hazel and the baby alive.

But the health center, their neighbors' homes, and their own home were devastated beyond recognition. Hazel remembers "when we saw it, we cried and cried.” Before the storm, her husband was a fisherman, like most people on the island. Now, even that little income is gone — because the boats were destroyed. With nowhere to go and no income, so many families, including Hazel's, were forced to live among the rubble. 

But your compassionate support is lifting the spirits and improving the lives of thousands of survivors. 

When Mercy Corps teams responded with lifesaving food packages and basic relief supplies, it was the first hopeful moment that Hazel had experienced in a long time. She said “my baby is very precious and this helps my baby” — nicknamed Baby Yolee after the storm (known locally as "Yolanda").  

Your generosity is helping us scale up long-term recovery efforts. You're giving families clean water and food. You're helping families build safer shelters and return to work. And you're giving kids a place to play safely and heal. 

There is still so much work to do and so many other families in need of urgent help. You can help more mothers, fathers, and children recover by sending your generous gift through our GlobalGiving Philippines page hereThank you for changing the lives of so many resilient survivors. 
Thank you for helping communities recover
Thank you for helping communities recover
Because of you, families can build safer shelters
Because of you, families can build safer shelters

Links:

Dec 30, 2013

Families begin to move forward after Typhoon Haiyan

Julita, Eastern Philippines
Julita, Eastern Philippines

Over a month after Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the Philippines, displaced families are understandably eager to return home and begin rebuilding. There has been a shortage of building materials in the country, but as more shipments make their way to battered islands, survivors are setting out to repair damage or set up temporary shelters.

Even in more remote areas that receive little assistance, resourceful residents are salvaging what debris and timber they can.

It's communities like this, farther from main distribution channels, that we targeted to receive new recovery kits with construction supplies like hammers, shovels, nails and tarps.

"I discussed with the village leader and the community what they needed most," Emergency Program Manager Dewi Hanifah explained of the first visit to Julita. "They wanted supplies that they could use for the longer term. Because most people work as farmers, they can also use the tools in these kits for their work and lives in the future."

Julita is an inland municipality deep in the eastern Philippines. Its remote location — accessed by a long drive over muddy, storm-ravaged roads — has made it difficult for the government to provide the area with relief.

Additionally, we distributed hygiene and cooking supplies including essential items like soap and detergent, and cooking and eating utensils. Over 400 families in Julita also received emergency rice distributions — a total of five tons — as the need for food remains an urgent priority for those displaced by the storm.

In all, we reached 1,800 families in 14 villages in Leyte province that were most affected by Typhoon Haiyan. The supplies help meet their day-to-day needs and give them the opportunity to focus on long-term rebuilding.

"It was wonderful to see the families' faces when they received the reconstruction kits. They haven't received any other help like this, and they kept saying how much they needed it," Dewi said.

Because of you, Mercy Corps is able to reach thankful families in remote locations who have yet to receive critical, if any, aid. And it is not too late to make more of an impact in 2013. You will reach more survivors of Typhoon Haiyan with lifesaving food, critical supplies and support that helps them recover and begin rebuilding.

On behalf of the resilient families in the Philippines who are now begining to move forward - thank you.

 

With Gratitude,

Alyssa Cogan

 

 

Families receive critical reconstruction kits
Families receive critical reconstruction kits

Links:

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Organization

Mercy Corps

Portland, OR, United States
http://www.mercycorps.org

Project Leader

Carlene Deits

Portland, OR United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Help Typhoon Haiyan survivors in the Philippines