Stop deforestation and restore grazing lands

 
$11,788
$63,212
Raised
Remaining
Aug 27, 2012

Developing Oran as Agroforestry Potential

Agroforestry plants raising at KRAPAVIS
Agroforestry plants raising at KRAPAVIS

The project introduces agro-forestry and soil fertility improvement techniques in adjoining of Bherunathji Oran in Bakhtpura village Rajasthan, India. Also, utilizes traditional water harvesting techniques in conjunction with the modern specific structures, which is to rehabilitate or recreate water storage structure, thereby to provide optional solutions to water dispersion in degraded land. Rain water harvesting units through ditches and trenching are being created for enhancing natural regeneration. Along with this to practice agro forestry in and around the Oran, special selected plants varieties are planted. The resources latter shall be consumed by the community. Thus, it will help to reduce the pressure on the Oran. KRAPAVIS, the project implementing organization, simultaneously support the agro-pastoralist communities with relevant knowledge and skills, giving special emphasis to women and youth on biodiversity conservation and sustainable resource management, which needed to continue the preservation of the Oran to ensure the sustainability. The Oran has environmental, socioeconomic and spiritual significance as Andhram Gujjar, a 70 year old agro-pastoralist from Bakhtpura village explains “Bherunathji to Hamara Jeevan Kendra Hai Jhan Paryavaran, Samaj Aur Dharma Sab Kuch Eak Sath Hai”. What conservationists, donors and other people think about this vital initiative?  

Andhram Gujjar, 70 year old agro-pastoralist
Andhram Gujjar, 70 year old agro-pastoralist
May 25, 2012

Oxford Scientist visits Orans

The Scientists team at Dehlawas oran
The Scientists team at Dehlawas oran

April 3-4, 2012, an Oxford scientist Dr Shonil Bhagwat accompanied by a TERI scientist Dr. Yogesh Gokhale and Aman Singh of KRAPAVIS visited Orans, the sacred groves in Rajasthan India.  They visited half a dozen orans which are being restored under this project. The scientists’ team gathered information in face-to face meetings with local communities, carried out field visits and provided their feed back/ suggestions on-the-spot.  Also, they suggested that along with restoration work, KRAPAVIS should take up scientific documentation of sacred groves around Sariska Tiger Reserve, in order to better understanding links in biodiversity conservation and sustaining livelihoods. The team is now in the process of developing a concept paper.

Jan 24, 2012

Documentation of 'Orans'

Documenting Orans_KRAPAVIS staff among community
Documenting Orans_KRAPAVIS staff among community

During the last three months, KRAPAVIS has documented 50 Orans in Jaipur District of Rajasthan (India). ‘Orans’ serve as a strong, shared and naturalised icon of village life.  As a communal and sanctified space, they are frequently utilized as forums for local affairs.  Matters pertaining to village politics, crops and livestock a well as the Oran itself may be discussed there, and punishments for offences relating to the Oran (e.g. encroachment, destructive extraction, and the like) are often enacted around the temple or shrine.  In the process of documentation, KRAPAVIS collected the basic information about the Orans through structured survey format; recorded GPS positions of each study Oran; took photographs of each surveyed site and drawn maps of each site, showing the location and important features on the boundary and within the site; recorded any encroachments, diversions, and allotments found through visual estimate or discussions with the local guide and communities; check vegetation status and state of grazing by visual estimate.

This process has had benefited the community, in the following manner;

  • Community led documentation- their observation; opinion, semi-structured interviews; oral histories were sought on the issue, not only in meeting but discussing on-the-site, in their homes, probing and triangulation.
  • Through this process they (community) become more informed on the vital issues of Orans.
'Orans' serve strong, shared icon of village life
Nov 6, 2011

Conserving Orans: the Bulwark of Rajasthan's pastoralists

Pastoralist uses Orans
Pastoralist uses Orans' Talabs- water source

The pastoralist communities of Rajasthan live mired in sobering destitution, subsisting in a hand-to-mouth fashion on distressingly meager resources. Yet even these few assets are perpetually under threat from Rajasthan’s arid and unpredictable climate, from its uncertain and volatile market. Such extensive challenges make life a daily struggle for the rural poor, yet they have had one support system that has helped them weather any crisis they were confronted with from times immemorial. The source of the vital assistance that enables these communities to surmount even the most extreme hardships is the sacred grove, or what is locally known as the ‘Oran’. Surviving through the ages due to their revered status that precludes unsustainable utilization, have always provided a much-needed lifeline and safeguard to their respective communities. They have done so by acting to unify people religiously, culturally and socially while providing a forum for village-level discussions, festivals and other social events; through provision of much needed sustenance for people and livestock through the ‘Talabs’ or rainwater harvesting structures, streams, wells or other water sources present in every Oran, as well as grazing pasture, which in turn enable the animals to provide dairy foods, wool, manure for use as fuel and fertilizer, and manual labor to plow the fields; valuable medicinal herbs and marketable fruits, berries, and other produce such as honey; as well as timber to be used under certain circumstances for fuel or construction materials.

KRAPAVIS, a voluntary organisation has been working in the semi-arid Aravalli hill bio-regions and arid Thar Desert of Rajasthan, India, with our field base stationed in the remote village of Bakhtpura, Alwar District, which borders the famous Sariska Tiger Reserve.  It works with rural and pastoralist communities, particularly with gujjars, to revitalize village Orans, both physically and conceptually - numerous approaches have been adopted, including training villagers, and cataloguing, reviving and campaigning for Orans; construction and repair of Oran Talabs, water harvesting structures and trenching units on the Orans’ land; setting up and maintaining a ‘Seed Bank’ and nurseries for tree plantation and grass broadcasting in Orans. During this monsoon (the reporting period), we planted about 10,000 saplings in the Orans.

Woman uses twings of
Woman uses twings of 'Japund' plants from Oran
Committee of older people, who looks after Oran
Committee of older people, who looks after Oran

Attachments:
Jun 2, 2011

Adaptation to Climate Change and Oran conservation

Water harvesting structure in a Oran
Water harvesting structure in a Oran

Climate change is evident in the experiences of the community in the project area (Alwar, Rajasthan India). They experienced that changes in local rainfall and seasonality have had clear cut consequences on the status and biotic composition of the Orans. The most apparent change has been in the decline of large plant species. The Orans of the area were renowned for their bamboo. Today their numbers have fallen sharply. Another large plant species know locally as Kala Khair (Acacia catechu) and Gugal (Commiphora wightii) have visibly decreased in presence. A most important species of the Oran in terms of its grazing utility was Dhok (Anogeissus pendula). The picture is similar for grasses and shrubs. For instance there is a  species locally known as Sawan, an excellent fodder grass and its grain is used to make food.  Its peculiarity is that it needs sustained light showers to grow optimally. The shortening of the rainy season has directly affected its growth, and there is today a severe decline in its availability. Similarly, it was reported that some twenty odd species of bulbous plants of medicinal value were formerly available in these Orans. Today these have become hard to find. As most Orans have water sources in the form of tanks known locally as Johads, talab and Bawari; many of these have now run dry.  For generations, people started sleeping outside in the open air along with their animals when the weather became warmer around the festival of colour (holi) in March.  Then, they moved themselves and their animals back indoors around the festival of lights (diwali) in October, marking start of the winter season.  Yet, in this generation they are sleeping outside 15-20 days before holi and moving back indoors 15-20 days after diwali because it is still too hot.

 

This project is trying to address all these issues/ challenges (e.g. climate change, water scarcity - reduced water availability from traditional sources of water in the Orans, loss of habitat and biodiversity) through planting trees and grasses, renovating water harvesting structures etc., in 10 orans of Rajasthan (India).  These Oran conservation initiatives have increased the adaptive capacity of communities, to deal with climate change in the following ways:

1)      Re-establishing methods and institutions for management of water bodies in orans, are of major importance, as they harbour springs, acquifers and water storage structures, leading to more efficient use of groundwater and thereby increasing communities’ ability to cope with drought.

2)      Encouraging the plantation of a wide variety of crops using scattered land holdings to cope with the expected reduction in annual rainfall associated with climate change in this region.

3)      Campaigning against water-intensive monocultures

4)      Introducing new low-cost technologies, including improved chulhas (stoves), solar paneling, etc., which reduced demand for fuel wood, thus helping to conserve Orans and maintain vegetation cover.

Oran committee members
Oran committee members

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating or by subscribing to this project's RSS feed.

donate now:

An anonymous donor is matching all new monthly recurring donations. Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $150
    give
  • $1,500
    give
  • $7,500
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $150
    each month
    give
  • $1,500
    each month
    give
  • $7,500
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
green leaf

Certified Green Project

This project is certified GlobalGiving Green for addressing climate change sustainability.
Learn more.

Project Leader

Aman Singh Singh

Project Leader
Alwar, Rajasthan India

Where is this project located?

Map of Stop deforestation and restore grazing lands