Help disabled and elderly disaster survivors

 
$106,296
$0
Raised
Remaining
Aug 2, 2011

Activity Report (May 17-30th, 2011)

May 17, 2011

Marathon Runner Mari TANIGAWA Runs with Disaster Victims

Between May 3rd and 6th, marathon runner Mari TANIGAWA (AAR JAPAN Executive Board Member and Ambassador for the Demining Campaign) visited areas in Iwate and Miyagi Prefectures affected by the March 11th earthquake to help at local soup kitchens and deliver relief supplies.
With the hope of bringing cheer to the evacuees through sporting activities, Tanigawa presented a lecture and stretching class at Higashihama Elementary School, as well as a mid-distance running class at the Oshika
Peninsula Evacuation Center, both of which are located in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture.
 
Smiles and Energy Unleashed through Sports
On May 5th (Children’s Day in Japan), Tanigawa led stretching, jogging, long-distance relay and mid-distance running classes at the Seiyukan Healthcare and Welfare Center on the Oshika Peninsula in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture.
The Seiyukan Center was used as an evacuation center for approximately 450 people immediately after the earthquake, but now it is occupied by 140 people, including people with disabilities who were former residents of the institution, staff from local government offices, and other evacuees.
May 5th - Children struggling to keep up with Tanigawa’s pace.
 
Realizing that the evacuees did not have many chances to exercise while living in the evacuation center, Tanigawa proposed a variety of fun activities. Thanks to the cooperation of Mr. Azumi Eiichi, chief of the local government office and its staff, people of all ages, from a 4-year old boy to a 76-year old woman, were able to participate in the events.  
Tanigawa started with stretching exercises. Though we could already see people desperately struggling to keep up with her movements, we couldn’t help but laugh along with the evacuees as they refused to give up. “I got tired because it’s been ages since I’ve been active,” a 50-year old male participant told us, though he seemed to be brimming with energy.
After Tanigawa offered instruction on running techniques, correct eye position and respiration methods, everyone jogged around the Seiyukan center. After each 500-meter lap, people began to drop out one-by-one, but the determined expressions of the children desperately trying to keep up with Tanigawa made a powerful impression on us.
Kids’ Unbeatable Energy Leaves Adults Behind 
April 5th – In the front row, three kids who joined in the mid-distance run (Left to right: Kaito, Ryoki and Mizuho). Mari TANIGAWA is second from right in the back.
 
Next, a relay was run between two teams. The event included amusing episodes, such as a competitor stopping and waiting while a 4-year old boy on the opposing team retrieved a shoe that had slipped off his foot. 
Last but not least was the mid-distance run. Mizuho SATO (2nd year junior high), Ryoki NARITA (1st year junior high) and Kaito MURAKAMI (6th year elementary school) joined Tanigawa on a 20-minute course near the beach. The three kids showed no sign of fatigue, and seemed to want to keep running even after having run for more than an hour already.
Finally, we organized a relay race between children and adults, including two AAR JAPAN staff members, with the result that the kids’ team won. Mizuho told us it was fun, while Ryoki said, “It was nice having the chance to run with Ms. Tanigawa” and Kaito commented simply, “It was pretty tough.”
Tanigawa was impressed by the kids’ tenacity and energy. She told them, “Keep up your running, and have fun doing long-distance relays with everyone,” to which the kids nodded shyly in response.
Throughout the day, we were able to see the participants raising their voices and having fun being active. I was happy to be able to ease the mental and physical stress suffered by people living in the complicated environment of an evacuation center. This kind of event shows that, even though material support is undoubtedly important, keeping the body and mind healthy through activity is also a vital concern.
 
Rapporteur
Junko MITO
Tokyo HQ, Publicity and Supporter Services Department
AAR JAPAN staff since 2010. From Okayama Prefecture.
May 26, 2011

Cooperating with the Local Commerce and Industry Association to Support Survivors in Temporary Housing

Providing Aid while Contributing to the Local Economy in Soma City and Minami-Soma City
In cooperation with the non-profit organization ADRA Japan, AAR JAPAN has been providing daily necessities to roughly 35,000 families living in temporary housing and rental housing in Fukushima Prefecture.
With the Japanese Red Cross Society having determined to distribute six-piece sets of electrical appliances in the affected areas, AAR JAPAN has decided to offer other daily necessities such as kitchen supplies, bathroom goods, vacuum cleaners, kotatsu (heated tables), chabu-dai (short-legged tables), cupboards and the like. This project is subsidized by the non-profit organization Japan Platform, with deliverable items selected based on requests from Fukushima’s prefectural or local government authorities.
Our target areas include 4 locations in the Soma region (Soma City, Minami-Soma City, Shinchi Town and Iitate Village) as well as Tomioka Town and Kawauchi Village in Futaba County. AAR JAPAN is cooperating with the Commerce and Industry Association in Soma City and Minami-Soma City to procure as many supplies locally as possible, with the goal of contributing to economic recovery as well as providing direct aid. Distribution has already begun.
In Tomioka Town, Kawauchi Village and Iitate Village, where residents have been evacuated due to the ongoing situation at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, AAR JAPAN will work closely with local government authorities and heed the voices of survivors in order to coordinate our aid activities.
May 30, 2011

AAR JAPAN Aims to Heed the Voice of Every Survivor

Since Friday, March 11th, AAR JAPAN has been engaged in aid activities for survivors of the Great East Japan Earthquake. With its hardest-hit areas located far from major city centers, Iwate Prefecture has been slow to recover compared to neighboring Miyagi Prefecture. Yuki DAIZUMOTO, who has been based in the Morioka Office and engaged in aid activities in Iwate Prefecture, reports on the present situation of AAR JAPAN’s efforts in the area.
 
From Sudan to the Disaster Area
On April 1st, AAR JAPAN opened its office in Morioka City as a base for relief operations in Iwate Prefecture. Many of our target facilities for people with disabilities and the elderly are located on the coast, so we spend a few hours every day going to the disaster zone.
I heard about the Great East Japan Earthquake while working in Sudan. I came back to Japan at the end of March, and then started to work in Morioka on April 7th. When I first visited the disaster area, it was some time before I could truly believe that the scene I had seen on the news now lay before me. I still clearly remember an old woman pointing to it all and murmuring, “There was a house there, and a bookshop next to it.” Not even the slightest sign of a building could be recognized.
 
Survivors are pleased to receive fresh food, which is rarely provided due to the difficulty of long-term storage. Yuki DAIZUMOTO (center) distributes oranges at a facility for people with disabilities. (Photo by Satoshi TAKAHASHI)
 
Rapidly Changing Needs
More than two months have passed since the earthquake, and circumstances have been changing in the disaster area. Rubble removal has progressed, supplies are being distributed, and there are more cars on the roads. In some areas, traffic jams occur where roads are closed for reconstruction work on the power lines. However, there are still other areas where the Self-Defense Force is searching for the missing, where water has yet to be reconnected, and there are no shops at all. While we refer to it all as the “disaster zone”, each part is different.
Requests from survivors have been changing. While previously they asked for drinking water and food with a long shelf life, these days we have been distributing fresh food such as vegetables and fruit, clothes for spring and summer, electric fans, and office supplies such as computers and printers that are necessary for facility operations. Local needs have been changing rapidly from fundamental life support supplies to the resources needed for a normal, productive life.
 
Strengthening Support for People with Disabilities, the Elderly, and Evacuees in Their Homes
Compared to Miyagi Prefecture, in Iwate Prefecture there is less information available about groups involved in supporting people with disabilities and the elderly, so we keep in close contact with each individual group and facility to keep abreast of their situations. Some people visit care facilities from their homes, which means they are likely to be omitted from lists of supply distribution, as these predominantly focus on evacuation centers. We need to strengthen our support for survivors in their homes to ensure that help gets to everyone.
At the request of the Iwate Prefectural Office, AAR JAPAN has also been cooperating in establishing systems to support a variety of tasks such as confirming the safety and whereabouts of survivors and distributing donations in order to contribute to each survivor’s quick recovery.
As Iwate Prefecture covers a large area, the number of groups working here is still not sufficient to meet the region’s needs. We will continue to watch the situation carefully to ensure that no-one is left out, and that we do not overlook even the smallest voice calling for support.
Aid activities in both Miyagi and Iwate Prefectures still face many challenges, and we thank you deeply for your continued support.
AAR JAPAN has also been aiding in the reconstruction of damaged facilities for people with disabilities and the elderly.
 
Rapporteur
 
Yuki DAIZUMOTO (Morioka Office)
Worked in private companies and government organizations after graduation from university
Worked in AAR JAPAN Sudan Office from 2009
Stationed in Morioka Office from April 2011, engaged in aid and relief activities for survivors of the Great East Japan Earthquake in Iwate Prefecture
(Born in Hyogo Prefecture)

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