Help disabled and elderly disaster survivors

 
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Oct 26, 2012

Our Progress on Helping PWDs and Elderly People

Users and workers at new Hinatabokko Care Center
Users and workers at new Hinatabokko Care Center

Introduction of Our Achievements

AAR Japan is implementing many projects in the Tohoku region to help evacuees of the disaster, especially persons with disabilities (PWDs) and elderly people.

In this report we would like to introduce some of the achievements we have accomplished recently (April 2012 onward). We used the generous donations received through GlobalGiving for some of these projects.

“Hinatabokko” – Care center for elderly people
Hinatabokko used to organize welfare services such as sending care workers and registered nurses to homes of elderly people to take care of their daily needs. Also Hinatabokko was a place of gathering and comfort for elderly people in Minami-Sanriku Town in Miyagi Prefecture until March 11th 2011, when the tsunami destroyed the building. Many people in the neighborhood lost their homes and families and evacuated out of the Tohoku region, while some, including PWDs and the elderly, stayed in the community. When Hinatabokko was destroyed, Hinatabokko could no longer operate to provide important and sometimes crucial service to their users. We recognized that the social care service was vital in the disaster-affected area. Therefore, supported by several organizations and donors, AAR Japan helped reconstruct the office building of Hinatabokko, which was completed in August 2012. 

Now more and more people utilize the Hinatabokko building and the service it offers. More than 100 elderly people use the care service and many of them come to talk and relax at Hinatabokko.

“Senshinkai” – Operator of workshops for PWDs
Senshinkai manages various types of workshops to provide hands-on job training and employment for PWDs. One of the workshops is Nozomi Workshop, which receives contract work from local companies for simple labor such as folding envelopes, putting together boxes, and wrapping products. Senshinkai, through its operation, gives valuable work opportunity to PWDs. To rebuild Senshinkai’s main office, AAR Japan, in cooperation with AmeriCares, repaired the building so that Senshinkai staff members can resume their operation to help PWDs in Kesennuma City.

Ogatsu Dental Clinic – Medical Clinic in Ishinomaki City
As our relief activities progress in the Tohoku region, we have seen a transition of needs of the people in the disaster-affected areas. In Miyagi Prefecture, many people still live in temporary housing complex where access to supermarkets, hospitals, clinics, and schools is hindered. In the Ogatsu district of Ishinomaki City, many buildings including banks, fire stations, kindergartens, and hospitals were destroyed along with 80% of the residences in the district.

With the help of many organizations and individuals, Ogatsu district managed to rebuild one small clinic to provide basic medical service to its residents, but there still was no place to provide dental service. AAR Japan, in cooperation with AmeriCares, established a new dental clinic in June 2012 so that the local people can receive dental treatment, including fitting of dentures for elderly people.

Our Resolution
These are just a few examples of our activities. These projects were accomplished with help of many organizations and individuals who are dedicated to lending a helping hand. We truly appreciate all the donations we continue to receive via GlobalGiving. We believe that size does not matter; the important thing is the fact that people care about each other and act in whatever way they can. With your donation, we can implement more activities to support those who are in need of help including PWDs and elderly people.

It will be our pleasure to report our future activities and the accomplishments we make with your help. In the Tohoku region, there are still many people who are in need of help and we will do our best to help those people.

We would like to thank everyone who is helping this cause.

Thank you for your support!

Sincerely,
Your AAR Japan Project Team

People relaxing in Hinatabokko
People relaxing in Hinatabokko
User and their family chatting in Hinatabokko
User and their family chatting in Hinatabokko
People at Nozomi workshop practicing paper folding
People at Nozomi workshop practicing paper folding
Patients treated at new Ogatsu dental clinic
Patients treated at new Ogatsu dental clinic
Jul 31, 2012

Ongoing Recovery Activities: There's still So Much to Do!

Field Trip for Children from Fukushima (July 2012)
Field Trip for Children from Fukushima (July 2012)

Dear Supporter,

You may have noticed that we have recently updated the title and description of the project you have been supporting. As you can imagine, the needs of the disaster survivors keep on changing, and so do our activities. This is why we have decided to do a little overhaul. In the project you are supporting, we are now giving priority to the repair of senior care homes and facilities for persons with disabilities (PWDs), as well as to the re-integration of PWDs who have lost their workplaces due to the disaster.

On the other hand, our support efforts for the tens of thousands of evacuees who now live in temporary housing facilities are ongoing. And we have just started several new programs in Fukushima Prefecture, too.

If you are interested, please have a look at our two other recovery projects for the earthquake and tsunami disaster survivors in Japan.

Two More AAR Japan Projects on GlobalGiving

"Building Healthy Communities for Recovery"
http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/building-healthy-communities-1/

"Support Evacuees of Fukushima"
http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/support-evacuees-of-fukushima/


Help Survivors to Make a New Start

There is still a lot of work to do in the disaster-hit areas of Japan! If you would like to help us provide long-term assistance to the earthquake and tsunami survivors, please consider making a monthly donation to one of the above projects. Every donation (be it one-time or recurring) is truly appreciated.

Thank you for your support!

Sincerely,
Your AAR Japan Project Team

May 14, 2012

Rebuilding Workplaces for Persons with Disabilities

New bakery building (Iwate Pref., 20 Jan 2012)
New bakery building (Iwate Pref., 20 Jan 2012)


Social Welfare Facility’s Bread Factory Expanded

In the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake, AAR JAPAN has been providing equipment and supporting the repair and maintenance of approximately 50 social welfare facilities in the disaster-affected areas. One of the facilities we support is Huck’s House, a vocational center for persons with disabilities in Tanohata Village, Iwate Prefecture.

Before the earthquake, the facility’s users made calamari in a seafood processing plant, bread in a bread factory, and Japanese pickles in an agricultural processing plant, all of which were run by Huck’s House. The seafood processing plant brought in a significant income, but the seaside plant was totally destroyed by the March 11th tsunami. To compensate, the facility decided to expand the bread factory and agricultural processing plant, which fortunately escaped damage from the tsunami. The new buildings of the bread factory and agricultural processing plant were completed at the end of December 2011.

Baking Class at the New Factory

The users of Huck’s House were very happy with the new bread factory. While full production will commence once all of the new equipment is installed in May 2012, partial production has already begun using the existing baking equipment.

On January 31st, 10 elementary and 5 junior high school students from the neighboring special needs school attended baking classes led by the baking supervisors at Huck’s House. This was the students’ first time to bake bread. All of them were excited to put on white caps, aprons and face masks, and they listened carefully to the instructions of Mr. Hideki TAKESHITA, the factory manager. “Bread dough breathes,” he told them—and for a moment everyone was afraid to touch the dough with their hands. When facility manager Atsuko TAKESHITA told them that they could make their favorite shapes with the dough, the students smiled and quickly started to make their own original designs.

When the students were done, the tray was lined with shapes of bread that were unique in the world. One boy made his bread in the image of his favorite teacher’s face, planning to give it to him when it was done. Another boy made a rainbow of 7 different types of jam along a 30-cm length of bread, hoping to surprise his friends. One girl simply crammed the dough with as much jam as she could.

The 3 bakers at Huck’s House supported the elementary school students. Like dependable elder brothers, they carried heavy trays, spread the students’ requested jams, and helped students who couldn’t close their dough around their jam. The dough was placed in the oven, and the bread was ready a short time later. The students were happy first with the pleasant smells, and then to see their own unique designs.

A Place for Interaction in the Community

Mr. Kiichi SOJIGAMI used to work at the seafood processing plant. “I was worried because I didn’t know when we could start working again,” he told us. “And we couldn’t see our colleagues because we needed to stay at home for a while after the earthquake.” Now he has started working at the newly-expanded bread factory. He told us enthusiastically, “I am learning now, but I want to be better. I’ll practice every day.”

Huck’s House has been selected to make bread for school lunch in the village, which is anticipated to offer a stable revenue stream. The neighbors both in the nearby temporary housing complex and in the local community are looking forward to having bread from Huck’s House, and the venue is expected to be a place for interaction in the community.

This project has been made possible thanks to many individual donations and through a grant from Japan Platform.

              HELP EARTHQUAKE SURVIVORS STAND UP ON THEIR FEET - GIVE NOW
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Baker Kiichi SHOJIGAMI (Huck
Baker Kiichi SHOJIGAMI (Huck's House, Iwate Pref.)
Student at Huck
Student at Huck's House (Iwate Pref., 31 Jan 2012)
Smile for you (Huck
Smile for you (Huck's House, 31 Jan 2012)
Apr 8, 2012

GlobalGiving visits AAR in Japan

Residents practice their stretching with AAR
Residents practice their stretching with AAR

For the past year I’ve been communicating with the great staff at the Association of Aid and Relief (AAR) in Japan, but last Sunday I was able to meet them in person and see firsthand the fabulous work that AAR is doing in the earthquake and tsunami affected areas in Tohoku that you have helped to support.

Our day started early as we made our way up to Sendai – about two hours north of Tokyo on the bullet train – where we were met by the AAR team.  They took us to visit three of the projects GlobalGiving donors are helping to support in the area around Ishinomaki.

On our first stop I met Sao Abe.  Mr. Abe was an Oyster fisherman on an island in Miyagi Prefecture before the earthquake and tsunami destroyed his home and livelihood on March 11 last year.  With his home gone, he was moved into a temporary shelter closer inland with his elderly mother.  Mr. Abe is a jokester with a natural smile and was part of a group that Mari, GlobalGiving’s President, and I met with during a site visit   He lives in a temporary shelter reserved for elderly or handicapped people with 35 other families.  The community center where we met is a small room that serves as a meeting place where the residents can talk, drink tea, read books, and start to reform the communities they lost in the disaster.  AAR provides services to help the people living in the temporary shelters to cope with the disaster and start to build a new community.   We joined the group in stretching exercises led by a physical therapist AAR brings in to help support the residents in the shelter.  They spoke highly of AAR’s involvement in the temporary shelter and with the people who live there.  During our visit, GlobalGiving's president, Mari Kuraishi, delivered cards with messages from GlobalGiving donors.

Next we visited a “container mall” that was built by AAR.  Before the tsunami hit Tohoku, many residents had small businesses that they had built their entire lives.  When their businesses, and the buildings they were housed in, were lost in the disaster, many families felt hopeless.  AAR supported the construction of a temporary mini-mall built from containers that currently house eight small businesses.  The best part for us was not just seeing the construction of the building and the operation of the shops, but also to see the cooperation among the various non-profit groups as well.  AAR built the main structure, but two other organizations had worked with them to improve the construction and support the businesses.

Finally, we visited a newly built fish market that was helping fishing families and small business owners rebuild their livelihoods.  In this case AAR hadn’t built the structure, but had supplied the refrigerator that was necessary in order to run a fish shop.  Without the refrigerator, the owners wouldn’t have been able to sell the fish before they go bad. Nicolette, our AAR host, explained to us that some of what AAR does is to provide the small – but necessary - things that people need to start to rebuild their lives.   Because of this, even small donations go a long way toward positive change for people in the Tohoku region.  Thanks for supporting these efforts!

Mari gives cards to Mr. Abe and other residents
Mari gives cards to Mr. Abe and other residents
The "container mall" built by AAR.
The "container mall" built by AAR.
The surrounding area was destroyed by the tsunami.
The surrounding area was destroyed by the tsunami.
Working in the temporary fish market.
Working in the temporary fish market.
Mar 7, 2012

One Year After the Earthquake: Activity Report

Teddy Bears for Kids in Fukushima (January 2012)
Teddy Bears for Kids in Fukushima (January 2012)

Japan: Eleven Months after the Great East Japan Earthquake

Continuing to Bridge the Disaster Survivors and their Supporters

AAR JAPAN has been carrying out relief efforts for the victims of the Great East Japan Earthquake since the immediate aftermath of the disaster. In addition to delivering emergency supplies to those who have limited access to aid, such as persons with disabilities (PWDs) and the elderly, AAR JAPAN is also repairing welfare facilities and providing vehicles for facilities for persons with disabilities.

In addition to distributing winter necessities and equipment for snow removal to people living in temporary housing complexes, AAR JAPAN is continuing to support the Building Healthy Communities Project, offering community interaction and exchange events to disaster survivors, many of who tend to spend their entire day isolated behind closed doors. We are also putting great efforts to the heart-warming chocolate delivery campaign as Valentine’s Day approaches.

AAR JAPAN will continue its relief efforts for the people of the disaster-affected areas, forming a bridge between the struggling disaster survivors and those who hope to support them. Below is a report on the activities that AAR JAPAN’s supporters have enabled us to carry out in the last 11 months:


AAR JAPAN’s Projects in Response to the Great East Japan Earthquake

1.      Delivering Relief to Families in Temporary Housing and Leased Housing in Fukushima Prefecture
2.      Support for Food Service at Schools in Minami-soma City, Fukushima Prefecture
3.      Psychological Care for Children in Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture
4.      Supporting Pregnant Women Living in and out of Fukushima Prefecture 
5.      Building Healthy Communities Project
6.      Delivery of Relief Supplies
7.      Reconstruction of Facilities for the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities
8.      Vehicle Provision
9.      Supporting Market Expansion for Products made by Persons with Disabilities
10.    Container Housing Project
11.    Hand-made Tote Bags Project
12.    Heart-Warming Chocolate and Hand-Written Message Delivery Campaign
13.    Charity Concerts
14.    “Let’s Bring Hot Springs to the Disaster Zone!” Project (concluded)
15.    Shuttle Bus Service (concluded)
16.    Mobile Clinic (concluded)
17.    Sanitation Services (concluded)
18.   Sportswear and Textbook Support for Students who Moved to Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture (concluded)


 1. Delivering Relief to Families in Temporary Housing and Leased Housing in Fukushima Prefecture

We have been supporting the day-to-day livelihoods of families living in temporary housing and subsidized housing in Fukushima Prefecture in cooperation with ADRA Japan. As the Japanese Red Cross has distributed six-piece sets of home electrical appliances in earthquake- and tsunami-affected areas, AAR JAPAN has focused on providing items such as kitchenware, bathroom goods, vacuum cleaners, kotatsu (heated tables) and regular tables, kitchen cabinets, and so on, based on requests from municipal governments. We are targeting 13 municipalities in the Hamadori and Nakadori regions of Fukushima Prefecture: Soma City, Minami-Soma City, Shinchi Town, Iitate Village, Tomioka Town, Kawauchi Village, Koriyama City, Sukagawa City, Kagamiishi Town, Shirakawa City, Nishigo Village, Yabuki Town, and Izumisaki Village. Following a request from the municipal governments of Minami-Soma City and Tomioka Town, both located within 20 km of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, we are also providing supplies to survivors who have taken refuge in other prefectures. In order to contribute to the economic recovery of the local communities, we are collaborating with the local Commerce and Industry Associations in 10 municipalities to source as many aid goods locally as possible. As of January 31st, 2012, we have completed the delivery of relief supplies to 22,455 households in the target area.

 
2. Support for Food Service at Schools in Minami-soma City, Fukushima Prefecture

AAR JAPAN provided vegetable juice and rice for approximately 2,800 schoolchildren in Kashima, Minami-Soma City. The Kashima area is just outside the restricted zone around Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, and since the accident, many children who used to attend school closer to the plant have now been relocated here. From July 1st to 22nd, vegetable juice was provided to every schoolchild twice a week, and a total of 2 tons of rice was supplied for school meals. Kashima was also experiencing a shortage of vehicles for delivering food to schools, so AAR JAPAN secured rented vehicles for food delivery from August 23rd.

 
3. Psychological Care for Children (Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture)

The SOMA Follower Team, which AAR JAPAN has been supporting, consists of 6 members including clinical psychologists, psychiatric social workers, and healthcare workers and has been providing psychological care for students and their parents at affected kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Soma City. In addition to the psychological care activities at schools, the team began to visit each and every one of 1,361 households in the 13 temporary housing complexes in Soma City since October, 2011 in order to grasp the current living conditions of the children and students at temporary housing complexes. By visiting each family, they ask how the children are doing and listen to their guardians’ concerns so that they can discover problems, if any arise, in the early stage and respond to them.

 
4. Supporting Pregnant Women

AAR JAPAN has been supporting “Project in Response to Needs of Infants, Children, and Pregnant Women of Fukushima” (represented by Sayaka FUNADA-CLASSEN) in order to respond to individual needs of families who desire to evacuate from Fukushima Prefecture to elsewhere on their own. In this project, we have been providing detailed assistance to the families with infants, children, and/or pregnant women who are particularly concerned about health problems due to radiation pollution after the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which was triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake. AAR JAPAN’s contribution enabled the delivery of heaters, heated carpets, and humidifiers among other items to 7 households that evacuated to Tokyo or Miyagi prefectures from Fukushima, and 160 toys and 110 stuffed animals to infants and children living in and out of Fukushima.


5. Building Healthy Communities
 Project

AAR JAPAN has been providing massages, calisthenics and psychological care, as well as community interaction and exchange events for roughly 3,000 people, focusing on persons with disabilities, the elderly, displaced people, and people staying in temporary housing in the disaster-affected areas of Miyagi and Iwate prefectures. Through these comprehensive efforts, AAR JAPAN continues to support people in the disaster zone as they work to maintain both their physical and mental health.

 
Massages/Calisthenics

AAR JAPAN has been sending occupational therapists and physiotherapists to evacuation centers, senior care centers, facilities for persons with disabilities, temporary housing, and individual homes in Miyagi and Iwate prefectures, offering massages and calisthenics to prevent disuse syndrome among 689 people from July 9th to January 29th, 2012.

  At the health and welfare center "Seiyukan" on the Oshika Peninsula, Miyagi Prefecture (July 9th, 2011)
At the community center and at private homes in Ayukawa, Oshika Peninsula, Miyagi Prefecture (July 9th, 2011)
At Shizugawa Highschool in Minami-sanriku Town, Miyagi Prefecture (July 16th, 2011)
At welfare facility "Nonbiri Sumichan House" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (July 26th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex "Hibiki" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (July 26th, 2011)
At welfare facility "Harunomorikara" in Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture (July 27th, 2011)
At "Miyako Ability Center", a vocational aid center for persons with disabilities in Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture (July 28th, 2011)
At "Fureai-so", a nursing home for the elderly in Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture (July 28th, 2011)
At the community center of the Shichigahama temporary housing complex in Miyagi County, Miyagi Prefecture (August 6th, 2011)
At the temporary housing complex on the premises of Showa-en in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (August 7th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex "Hibiki" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (August 13th, 2011)
At the Kojirahama temporary housing complex in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (August 20th, 2011)
At the community center of the Ayukawahama temporary housing complex in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (August 21st, 2011)
At welfare facility "Nonbiri Sumichan House" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (August 28th, 2011)
At welfare facility "Hamanasu no Sato"in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (August 28th, 2011)
At the temporary housing complex on the premises of Onagawa Elementary School No. 3, Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (September 3rd, 2011)
At the community center of temporary housing complex # 7 in Otsuchi, Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture (September 4th, 2011)
At the community center of temporary housing complex # 5 in Otsuchi, Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture (September 4th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex "Hibiki" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (September 10th, 2011)
At Kasshi Town Plot No. 7 (Ohata West), Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (September 11th, 2011)
At the Kyubunhama temporary housing complex in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (September 17th, 2011)
At temporary housing complexes Wano and Sanoya in Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture (September 18th, 2011)
At Sports Center 1 in Miyagi County, Miyagi Prefecture (September 23rd, 2011)
At the Kashinai temporary housing complex in Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture (September 24th, 2011)
At the Obuchihama temporary housing complex in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (October 1st, 2011)
At the Kugunarihama temporary housing complex in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (October 14th, 2011)
At the community center of the Shichigahama temporary housing complex in Miyagi County, Miyagi Prefecture (October 15th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex "Hibiki" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (October 22nd, 2011)
At the temporary housing complex on the premises of Onagawa Elementary School No. 3, Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (November 5th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex "Hibiki" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (November 12th, 2011)
At welfare facility "Sasae-Ai Yamamoto" in Watari Town, Miyagi Prefecture (November 26th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex Hakosaki No. 3 in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (December 3rd, 2011)
At the community center of the Shichigahama temporary housing complex in Miyagi County, Miyagi Prefecture (December 4th, 2011)
At "Koguni no Sato", a temporary housing complex for persons with disabilities in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (December 11th, 2011)
At senior care center "Sayuri" in Rikuzentakata City, Iwate Prefecture (December 17th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex Hakosaki No. 3 in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (December 18th, 2011)
At temporary housing complex Hakosaki No. 3 in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (January 14th, 2012)
At temporary housing complex Hakosaki No. 3 in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (January 15th, 2012)
At welfare facility "Chiraku-so" in Yamamoto Town, Miyagi Prefecture (January 21st, 2012)
At temporary housing complex "Hibiki" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (January 22nd, 2012)
At the Kami-Osabe temporary housing complex in Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture (January 28th, 2012)
At Kariyado Fishing Port in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (January 29th, 2012)

Psychological Care

To mitigate stress both from the earthquake and from long-term evacuee life, AAR JAPAN has been sending counselors to evacuation centers, temporary housing units, and individual homes to provide psychological care. We provided counseling for 479 people between August 6th, 2011 and January 20th, 2012.

 
Community Interaction and Exchange Events

AAR JAPAN has been actively promoting community interaction and exchange events to help encourage the development of social ties in evacuation centers and temporary housing. In this effort, we have been organizing soup kitchens, delivering relief supplies, and providing rehabilitation services such as massages and aroma therapy. To date, we have organized or participated in events in the following locations:

 Festival at Wako Kindergarten in Shichigahama Town, Miyagi Prefecture (July 23rd, 2011)
Temporary housing complex on the premises of Showa-en in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (August 7th, 2011)
Bon Festival in Onagawa Town, Miyagi Prefecture (August 15th, 2011)
Higashihama Elementary School on the Oshika Peninsula, Miyagi Prefecture (August 18th, 2011)
Toni Town, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (August 20th, 2011)
Senior care center in Otomo Town, Rikuzentakata City, Iwate Prefecture (August 20th, 2011)
Offering aromatherapy at Higashihama Elementary School in Miyagi Prefecture (August 23rd, 2011)
Workshop for persons with disabilities in Yamada Town, Shimohei County, Iwate Prefecture (August 26th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex in Kasshi Town, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (August 27th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex in Shichigahama Town, Miyagi Prefecture (August 28th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (September 11th, 2011)
Gym of Nakano Junior High School in Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture (September 17th, 2011)
Community room at Kashinai temporary housing complex in Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture (September 24th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex in Kuribayashi Town, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (September 25th, 2011)
Gym of Nakano Junior High School in Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture (September 25th, 2011)
In front of a shop in Sakuragi-cho, Otsuchi Town, Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture (September 28th,2011)
Temporary housing complex in Kesen Town, Rikuzentakata City, Iwate Prefecture (October 2nd, 2011)
Festival at Kurosaki Shrine in Hirota Town, Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture (October 9th, 2011)
“Everyone's Festival Bureiko” in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (October 10th, 2011)
Dosen Subsidized Apartments in Kasshi Town, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (October 16th, 2011)
Higashihama Elementary School in Ishinomaki City, Iwate Prefecture (October 11th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex # 9 in Otsuchi Town, Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture (October 23rd, 2011)
Takinosato in Takekoma, Rikuzentakata City, Iwate Prefecture (October 25th, 2011)
Workshop "Himawari" in Kesennuma City, Miyagi Prefecture (October 29th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex Hakosaki No. 3 in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (October 30th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex on the premises of Onagawa Elementary School No. 3, Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (November 5th, 2011)
"Atelier Sun", an employment support center for persons with disabilities in Hokuda, Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture (November 12th, 2011)
Parking lot in front of A. Sasaki's house in Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture (November 13th, 2011)
Shokei University in Natori City, Miyagi Prefecture (November 19th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex Tenjin in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (November 20th, 2011)
Nakano Sakae Community Center in Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture (November 27th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex Hakosaki No. 3 in Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (November 27th, 2011)
Temporary housing complex on the Ishinomaki bypass construction site in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (December 10th, 2011)
"Yamada Kyosei Sagyosho", an employment support center for persons with disabilities in Yamada Town, Iwate Prefecture (December 13th, 2011)
Shakunagenokai", a medical care facility for persons with severe disabilities in Sadanai, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture (December 14th, 2011)
Community room of temporary housing complex "Hibiki" in Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture (December 14th, 2011)
Higashihama Elementary School in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture (December 15th, 2011)
Tsubaki Factory", a workshop for persons with intellectual disabilities in Ikawa Town, Ofunato City, Iwate Prefecture (December 19th, 2011)
"Suzuran-to-Katatsumuri", a workshop for persons with disabilities in Rikuzentakata City, Iwate Prefecture (December 20th, 2011)

In coordination with Ingram Co., Ltd., which is responsible for the Peace Project, AAR JAPAN organized soup kitchens at a total of 73 locations in Miyagi and Iwate prefectures between March 31st, 2011 and January 7th, 2012. Since August, the soup kitchens have been operated as part of the Building Healthy Communities Project.

Miyagi Prefecture:
Watanoha, Aikawa, Kitakami, and Ayukawa areas (Oshika Peninsula) in Ishinomaki City; Wakabayashi District in Sendai City; Tagajo City; Shizugawa and Utatsu in Minami-sanriku Town; Niitsuki, Shishiori, and Omose areas in Kesen-numa City

Iwate Prefecture:
Kamaishi City, Rikuzen-takata City, Taro Town in Miyako City, Yamada Town, Otsuchi Town

Fukushima Prefecture:
Haramachi Ward in Minami-Soma City

 Menu 
Tokushima ramen, Oden, Beef stew, Yakisoba (fried noodles), Fried chicken, Vegetable sticks, Chukadon (Chinese-style stir-fried meat and vegetables on rice), Beef steak, Onion soup, Tuna sashimi on rice, Chanko-nabe (hot pot), Apple pie, Onion sauté, Minestrone, Ground chicken with egg and vegetables on rice, Fish miso soup, Hijiki seaweed mix, Fried sweet potato, Cabbage rolls, Mixed bean-curd lees and vegetables, Autumn rice, Pork miso soup, Stewed fish, Cabbage and spinach side dishes, Somen noodles, Minced fish soup, Hand-made sweet potato pies, Hand-made langue du chats, Samgyetang (Korean chicken ginseng soup), Yakitori (grilled chicken), Miso soup with tofu and shimeji mushrooms, Stewed meat and potatoes, Boiled komatsuna (Japanese mustard spinach), Pasta with meat sauce, Potato salad, Miso soup with Chinese cabbage and shiitake mushrooms, Boiled field mustard, Inarizushi (fried tofu stuffed with venerated rice), Cooked radish and minced meat, Kashiwa mochi (rice cake wrapped in oak leaf), Fried whitefish, Miso soup with radish, Radish salad, Fruit Jell-O, Udon noodles, Almond Jell-O, Stir-fried meat with vegetables, Gyoza (Chinese dumplings), Borscht, Miso soup with clams, Marinated octopus, Miso soup with cabbage and Japanese mustard spinach, Raw squid with wasabi, Seafood curry and rice (with scallops, clams and shrimp), Japanese sweets and amazake (sweet mild sake), Charcoal-broiled fish, Kakigori (shaved ice with flavored syrup), Grilled corn, Kitsune udon, Okonomiyaki (Japanese pancakes), Japanese dace, Daikon-oroshi (grated Japanese radish), Pickled vegetables, Unaju (grilled eel on rice), Vegetables pickled in sake lees, Miso soup with wakame seaweed and green onion, Rice-fed pork from Sumida Town grilled with local vegetables on rice, Tada farm cheese pudding, Rice balls with chestnuts, Soba with tempura, Boiled taro, Konnyaku with bean paste, Congee with seven leaves, etc.

6. Delivery of Relief Supplies

Needs have altered as seasons change and people’s lives inch toward normalcy. AAR JAPAN is currently delivering portable power generators to persons with disabilities who rely on respirators to breathe. We have also been providing winter necessities for the harsh cold of the season.


Relief Supplies Delivered to Affected Areas from March 14th to January 30th
Provided to 120,326 people in 1,525 locations 

Distribution Areas:
Miyagi Prefecture: Sendai City, Ishinomaki City, Kesen-numa City, Natori City, Tome City, Higashi-Matsushima City, Onagawa Town, Tagajo City, Iwanuma City, Minami-sanriku Town, Yamamoto Town, Shiogama City

Iwate Prefecture: Otsuchi Town, Ofunato City, Rikuzen-takata City, Kamaishi City, Yamada Town

Fukushima Prefecture: Soma City, Minami-Soma City

Yamagata Prefecture: Kamiyama City
 
Type of Facilities:
Evacuation centers, facilities for persons with disabilities, facilities for the elderly, social welfare councils, foster homes, shopping centers, social welfare corporations, volunteer centers, ambulatory facilities for the elderly, disaster countermeasures offices, temporary housing, evacuees’ homes, daycare centers, kindergartens, elementary schools, junior high schools, senior high schools, others.
 
Supplies Delivered:
Diesel oil (13,600 liters), Kerosene (4,400 liters), Gasoline (2,060 liters), Water (14 tons), Rice (2.5 tons), Milk (480 packs), Sweet-bean cakes (41,000 units), Vegetables (potatoes, carrots, onions, spinach, cabbage, radishes, green onions, bell peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, chives, eggplants, kidney beans, edamame beans, pumpkins, burdock roots, taro, sweet potatoes, Chinese cabbage, corn, Japanese mustard spinach, dried shiitake and others), Fruit (mandarin oranges, bananas, watermelons, grapefruits, melons, etc.), Eggs, Other food (retort foods, food for the elderly, canned food, miso, soy sauce, dietary supplements, etc.), Blankets, Bedclothes, Underclothes, Clothes and scarves, Towels and hand cloths, Furoshiki wrapping cloths, Face masks, Hand warmers, Sleeping bags (3,400 units), Cold medicine and other medical supplies, Toothbrushes, Paper diapers, Adult diapers, Women’s sanitary products, Batteries, Baby products (baby food, pacifiers, feeding bottles, baby wipes, etc.), High-pressure washers (32 units), Chainsaws (30 units), Shovels, Boots, Books and picture books, Crayons, Cell phone chargers, Computer sets (37 units), Printers (2 units), Photocopying machines (5 units), Bicycles (294 units), Sputum aspirators (2 units), Care beds (31 units), Folding beds (2 units), Futon sets (30 units), Wheelchairs (22 units), Care chairs (2 units), Walkers (35 units), Power generators (3 units), Laundry machines (29 units), Drying machines (23 units), Refrigerators (30 units), Microwave ovens (7 units), Electric fans (51 units), Vacuum cleaners (44 units), Air cleaners (16 units), Rice cookers (8 units), Futon dehumidifiers (34 units), Reflective heaters (5 units), Kerosene heaters (2 units), Automatic blood pressure meters (34 units), Television sets (33 units), Dish dryers (2 units), Electric fans, Dehumidifiers, Weight scales, Clothes irons, Ironing tables, Rotary printing machines, Pull carts, Dollies, Audio players (10 units), Portable radios, Walking sticks, Cooking knives, Cutting boards, Small shelving units, Bookshelves, Clothing cases, Disinfectant spray, Hand soap, Reading glasses, Stuffed toys, Other toys, Thermos bottles, Digital cameras, DVD players, Video cameras, Mattresses, Sheets, Cotton blankets, Pesticides, Bug repellant, Mosquito nets, Toilet paper, Laundry detergent, Kitchen detergent, Toilet soap, Laundry baskets, Hangers, Cleaning buckets, Paper dishes, Notebooks, Copy paper, Tinfoil and cling wrap, Grass-cutting scythes, Grass cutters, Cucumber seedlings, Tomato seedlings, Flower seedlings, Screen windows, Laundry poles, Summer clothes, Rubber boots, Sandals, Slippers, Ice packs, Neck coolers, Inflatable play pools, Nutritional supplements, Umbrellas, Taisho harp sets, Electric piano sets, Keyboards, Taiko drums, Tea ceremony sets, Other small musical instruments, Sewing machines, Scarves, Sweaters, Down jackets, Fleeces and other winter clothes, Farming boots, Garden supplies, Table tennis sets, Electrical generators (23 units), Foot-operated aspirators, Hearing aids, Braille printers, Cultivators, Air purifiers, Heated carpets, Rugs, Kotatsu (heated table) sets, Gas and electric heaters, Hot water bottles, Electric blankets, Curtains, Christmas trees, Portable power generators (113 units), Snow plows (5 units), Shovels for snow removal (180 units), Portable heaters (1,418 units), and others.

 
7. Institutional Reconstruction

In coordination with local construction companies, AAR JAPAN has been repairing senior care centers and facilities for persons with disabilities in approximately 50 locations to accelerate resumption of services. From April 21st, 2011 to January 31st, 2012 AAR JAPAN repaired and provided equipment to the following social welfare facilities and NGOs:

1.   Rubert (Operated by Minori-kai, Natori City, Miyagi Prefecture)
2.   Clovers Pier Wasse (Operated by Shinwa-kai, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
3.   Workshop Himawari (Operated by Senshin-kai Yume-no-mori, Kesen-numa City, Miyagi Prefecture)
4.   Gin-no-hoshi (Operated by Yamoto-aiiku-kai, Higashi-Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture)
5.   Kurihara-shuho-kai (Kurihara City, Miyagi Prefecture)
6.   Himawari Family (Operated by Fureai-no-mori, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
7.   Echo Ryouiku-en (Operated by Yoko Fukushi-kai, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
8.   Coconet Autism Peering Center (Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
9.   Miyama-sou Special Nursing Home (Operated by Seiwa-kai, Yamamoto Town, Watari County, Miyagi Prefecture)
10.  Kamuri Gakuen (Operated by Aisen-kai, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
11.  Daimatsu Gakuen (Operated by Hoshin-kai, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)
12.  Group Home Kamikuri-sou (Operated by Kamaishi Kyosei-kai, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)
13.  Yoshihama-sou (Operated by Aisei-kai, Ofunato City, Iwate Prefecture)
14.  Kojuen (Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
15.  Lumbini-en (Operated by Korin-kai, Hanamaki City, Iwate Prefecture)
16.  Asunaro Home (Operated by Sansan-kai, Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
17.  Yamada Kyosei Workshop (Operated by Yamada Kyosei-kai, Yamada Town, Shimohei County, Iwate Prefecture)
18.  Taiyou-kai (Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
19.  Machikado Counseling Link Matsubara Home (Operated by Aiiku-kai Social Welfare Corporation, Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
20.  Care Home Megumi (Kesen-numa City, Miyagi Prefecture)
21.  Harakara Fukushi-kai (Shibata Town, Shibata County, Miyagi Prefecture)
22.  Cosmos House (Operated by Shiraishi Yoko Gakuen, Shiraishi City, Miyagi Prefecture)
23.  Sakurambo Club (Tome City, Miyagi Prefecture)
24.  Shiraishi Jukouen (Operated by Shiraishi Yoko Gakuen, Shiraishi City, Miyagi Prefecture)
25.  Zao Suzushiro (Operated by Harakara Fukushi-kai, Zao Town, Katta County, Miyagi Prefecture)
26.  Hatamaki Kyodo Workshop (Operated by Harakara Fukushi-kai, Igu County, Miyagi Prefecture)
27.  Riverside Song, Song of the Surf, Seaside Song (Operated by Dreamers’ Home, Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture)
28.  Izumi Workshop (Operated by Aiko Fukushi Kyokai, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
29.  Fukushi Net ABC (Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)  
30.  Hoyu-kan (Operated by Taiyo-kai, Ofunato City, Iwate Prefecture)
31. Sendai Tsudoi House Koppel (Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
32. Nakata Sun Farm (Tome City, Miyagi Prefecture)
33. Jiai Fukushi Gakuen (Operated by Taiyo-kai, Ofunato City, Iwate Prefecture)
34. Kamaishi Work Station (Operated by Hoyu-kai, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)
35. Warabi Gakuen (Operated by Warabi-kai, Otsuchi Town, Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture)
36. Huck’s House (Tanohata Village Shimohei County, Iwate Prefecture)
37. Hamanasu Gakuen (Operated by Shinwa-kai, Yamada Town, Shimohei County, Iwate Prefecture)
38. Smile Workshop (Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
39. Kibo-en (Operated by Katei Fukushi-kai, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
40. Miyako City Center for Persons with Disabilities (Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture)
41. Muraden Ltd. group home, Kesen-numa City, Miyagi Prefecture
42. Saiwai Town Welfare (Operated by Miyagi Persons with Disabilities Association, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
43. Full House Free Space Soleil (Taihaku Ward, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
44. Headquarters of Sarakara Sukushi-kai (Izumi Ward, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
45. Kosen Gakuen (Operated by Aisen-kai, Izumi Ward, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
46. Work Fale (Operated by Aisen-kai, Izumi Ward, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
47. Yamamoto Town Workshop (Operated by Yamamoto Town Social Welfare Cooperation, Yamamoto Town, Watari County, Miyagi Prefecture)

8. Vehicle Provision

AAR JAPAN has been providing vehicles as vital means of transportation for people who make use of welfare facilities. AAR JAPAN has provided the following vehicles:

1.      One (1) van – Nozomi Fukushi Workshop (Operated by Senshin-kai, Minami-sanriku Town, Miyagi Prefecture)
2.      One (1) mini-vehicle – Huck’s House (Tanohata Village, Shimohei County, Iwate Prefecture)
3.      One (1) van – Kujira-no-shippo (Operated by Ishinomaki Shoshin-kai, Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture)
4.      One (1) mini-vehicle – Kick-off Career and Life Support Center for Persons with Disabilities (Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)
5.      One (1) van – Work House Atelier Sun (Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture)
6.      One (1) elderly-care taxi – Yamazaki Taxi (Yamada Town, Shimohei County, Iwate Prefecture)
7.      One (1) compact car – Hikami-no-sono (Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
8.      One (1) mini-van – Group Home Kibogaoka (Operated by Harmony Utatsu, Minami-sanriku City, Motoyoshi County, Miyagi Prefecture)
9.      Three (3) vehicles – Sasae-ai Yamamoto (Yamamoto Town, Watari County, Miyagi Prefecture)
10.    One (1) mini-vehicle – Warabi Gakuen (Otsuchi Town, Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture)
11.    One (1) mini-vehicle – Kamaishi Workshop (Chidori Town, Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)
12.    One (1) van – Suzuran-to-Katatsumuri (Takekoma Town, Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
13.    One (1) vehicle – Madoka Arahama (Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
14.    One (1) elderly care taxi – Otsuchi Taxi (Otsuchi Town, Iwate Prefecture)
15.    One vehicle – Aozora (Miyako City, Iwate Prefecture)
16.    One wagon with wheelchair lift – Yamada Kyosei Workshop (Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)

9. Supporting Market Expansion for Products made by Persons with Disabilities

AAR JAPAN supports various workshops for persons with disabilities, many of which raise funds by selling products such as home-made sweets in their local area. Sales in the disaster-affected areas have decreased sharply since the Great East Japan Earthquake, and AAR JAPAN has been supporting the exploration of new markets for these welfare facilities’ products. We are currently supporting the following facilities:

 1.      Harakara Fukushi-kai (Shibata Town, Shibata County, Miyagi Prefecture)
2.      Kurihara-shuho-kai (Kurihara City, Miyagi Prefecture)
3.      Smile Workshop (Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
4.      Kamuri Gakuen (Operated by Aisen-kai, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
5.      Fukushi Net ABC (Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture)
6.      Shomatsu-kan (Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
7.      Asunaro Home (Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
8.      Miyako Work Station (Miyako City, Miyagi Prefecture)
9.      Kamaishi City Fukushi Workshop (Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)
10.    Warabi Gakuen (Otsuchi Town, Kamihei County, Iwate Prefecture)
11.    Hoyu-kan (Ofunato City, Iwate Prefecture)

10. Container Housing Project

At the recommendation of international journalist Izuru SUGAWARA, AAR JAPAN has been providing easy-to-build prefabricated container housing units in the disaster zone. To date, we have installed 52 units in Onagawa Town in Oshika County and in Minami-sanriku Town, Miyagi Prefecture, and in Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture. These container housing units are being used by evacuees as private residences and small shops.


11. Hand-made Tote Bags Project

AAR JAPAN collected hand-made tote bags in response to requests from people in evacuation centers and senior care facilities for bags in which to carry their personal belongings. By May 20th, AAR JAPAN had received 5,000 bags from inside and outside of Japan. Volunteers helped to attach AAR JAPAN’s “Sunny-chan” mascot straps to the bags and deliver them to evacuees, with a special focus on the elderly. Survivors who received the bags were pleased not only with the bags themselves, but also with the various encouraging messages written inside.

The project was such a success that AAR JAPAN began collecting bags again in October. By November 14th, AAR JAPAN had received 2,781 bags, which we are now distributing in the disaster-affected areas. Adults use our bags for shopping, while children use them for school.

 
12. Heart-Warming Chocolate Delivery Campaign

In cooperation with Rokkatei Confectionery Co., Ltd., AAR JAPAN has been delivering chocolate to evacuees in the disaster-affected areas. When people order chocolate for themselves, they also buy chocolate for people in the disaster-affected areas, writing a message to accompany their donation. As of December 23rd, 2011, we have delivered 384 packages of chocolate to evacuees at a temporary housing complex in Iitate Village, Fukushima Prefecture. The evacuees expressed great contentment with both the chocolate and the messages.

 
13. Charity Concerts

In cooperation with Support 21 Social Welfare Foundation, AAR JAPAN’s sister organization, we held a fund-raising concert at the Opera City Concert Hall in Tokyo on May 20th, 2011. Through concert revenues we provided 227 musical instruments to the following institutions, at an equivalent value of 35 million yen:

1.     Takata Senior High School (Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)   
2.     Takata Elementary School (Rikuzen-takata City, Iwate Prefecture)
3.     Kamaishi Higashi Junior High School (Kamaishi City, Iwate Prefecture)
4.     Watanoba Junior High School (Ishinomaki Ciity,Miyagi Prefecture)
5.     Minato Junior High School (Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture)
6.     Kobunkan Senior High School (Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture)
7.     Noda Junior High School (Noda Village, Iwate Prefecture)
8.     Ishinomaki Brass Band Association (Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture) 

 On August 5th, 2011, we held another concert entitled “Concert of Heart: Hope” at Seinen Bunka Center in Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture, which many disaster survivors were able to enjoy for free.

 On October 20th, 2011, AAR JAPAN co-hosted “Hope” at the Lyceum Theatre in Shanghai, China, where eight Shanghai-based musicians performed a concert supporting reconstruction in the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake. Led by Mr. Kaoru SHINSHI, the Shanghai-based Japanese volunteer group Friend played a vital role in the concert’s planning committee, which was headed by Mr. Hiroyoshi IKEDA of the Shanghai branch of MYTS Co., Ltd. AAR JAPAN’s Deputy Chairperson, Taki KATOH, presided at the concert.

14. “Let’s Bring Hot Springs to the Disaster Zone!” Project (Concluded)

In coordination with Manyo Club Co., Ltd. (Yokohama City, Kanagawa), Ascendia Inc.(Shinagawa Ward, Tokyo) and other companies, AAR JAPAN implemented the “Let’s Bring Hot Springs to the Disaster Zone!” Project. With the cooperation of Kanagawa Prefecture’s Yugawara Onsen (hot spring), on the first day of the project, April 9th, AAR JAPAN delivered hot spring water to four sites that were used as evacuation centers in Matsushima City, Miyagi Prefecture: Yamoto Dai-ichi Junior High School, Akai City Center, Ushiami Community Center, and Asai Civic Center. After April 12th, in partnership with Miyagi Prefecture’s Onikobe Onsen (hot spring), AAR JAPAN delivered hot spring water every day except Sundays to six evacuation centers: Yamoto Dai-ichi Junior High School (later divided into two locations), Ushiami Community Center, Akai City Center, Asai Civic Center, and Miyato Elementary School in Higashi-Matsushima City, as well as Ishinomaki Shoshin-kai Social Welfare Corporation in Ishinomaki City. These six delivery points enabled 500-600 evacuees to bathe every day, and AAR JAPAN provided the service until the end of May.

 
15. Shuttle Bus Service (Concluded)

In Miyagi, AAR JAPAN aided in the operation of a shuttle bus service on Ishinomaki City’s Oshika Peninsula, providing mobility for those who had lost their regular means of transportation. A light shuttle bus circulated twice a day in the Ogihama area and once a day in the Ayukawa area. Beginning April 10th, approximately 530 people in the Ogihama area and 220 people in the Ayukawa area used the buses. The service was concluded on June 4th after roads were repaired and normal bus lines resumed operation.
 

16. Mobile Clinics and Health-related Services (Concluded)

AAR JAPAN visited Makinohama, Takenohama, Kitsunezakihama, Sudachi, Fukkiura, Kozumihama, and Kobuchihama on the Oshika Peninsula, where approximately 640 survivors are taking shelter in their homes. Led by Dr. Toshiaki YASUDA, a local medical practitioner, AAR JAPAN’s medical team established a mobile clinic and implemented health-related services such as checking up on sufferers of chronic illnesses, preventing the spread of infectious diseases, and implementing psychological support. We examined a total of 817 people between March 19th, and September 18th, 2011 Home-care nurses visited an additional 387 people in temporary housing in Ishinomaki City between August 10th and September 15th, 2011. This service ended on September 30th, 2011 as local medical facilities resumed operation.

17. Sanitation Services (Concluded)

AAR JAPAN implemented sanitation services for approximately 1,000 people in evacuation centers in Ishinomaki City and Minami-sanriku Town, Miyagi Prefecture. As futons, blankets, and mattresses became dirty as a result of long-term use in evacuation centers, we dried them in the sun and collected old and dirty futons to be replaced with summer-season bedding. We also engaged in general cleaning in evacuation centers, where the summer rise in humidity and temperature led to deterioration in sanitary conditions, including a huge increase in flies and mosquitoes. AAR JAPAN also distributed futon driers, vacuum cleaners, dehumidifiers, cleaning equipment, insect repellent and insecticides (fly tape, mite killer, etc.) with instructions on their use. To reduce the risk of food poisoning, we delivered refrigerators to evacuation centers that lacked them. We implemented these efforts in 25 evacuation centers from June 14th, 2011 to August 31st, 2011. This service ended on August 31st, 2011.

18.  Sportswear and Textbook Support for Students who Moved to Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture (Concluded)

In temporary housing complexes in Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture, people who evacuated from other areas in the prefecture (Minami-Soma City, Futaba Town, etc.) are settling into their new homes after a series of relocations. With each move, parents had to obtain new school sportswear and textbooks, which differ from school to school, when their children matriculated in local elementary schools. To ease the burden on parents, AAR JAPAN has been obtaining school sportswear and textbooks for students in Soma City, making distributions to 46 students between September and December 2011.

 

 All of the relief efforts outlined above are based on financial and material aid from private companies, various organizations and associations, schools, and individuals as well as Japan Platform. While it would be impossible to introduce all of our individual supporters, we offer you our sincerest thanks. We deeply appreciate your generous and continued support. 

Heart-Warming Chocolate Campaign (January 2012)
Heart-Warming Chocolate Campaign (January 2012)

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Project Leader

Yuko Ito

Program Coordinator
Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo Japan

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Map of Help disabled and elderly disaster survivors