Help a Landmine Victim Walk Again

 
$13,874
$46,126
Raised
Remaining
Aug 4, 2011

Update from the Marshall Legacy Institute

Survivors learning computer skills in Afghanistan
Survivors learning computer skills in Afghanistan

Survivor Assistance Program Progress Report:

MLI's Survivors' Assistance program continues to make great progress, helping children and young adults who have been injured by landmines.  Most recently, MLI helped a young man named Najeebullah from the Laghman Province of Afghanistan who lost his leg at 15 when he went to fetch the family cow at his mother’s request.  The cow was standing less than 100 yards from their family home, but the short walk quickly turned into nightmarish experience for Najeebullah who lost his right leg after stepping on a landmine.  Unable to afford a prosthetic leg, Najeebullah spent the past three years believing that his life was virtually over because he was not mobile enough to help his family farm the land and he did not have any other skills.  

But he was found by the MLI team who introduced him to one of the new computer centers that MLI has established in Afghanistan to help survivors.  He began receiving advanced computer training and hopes to soon be able to bring in some additional income for his family.  Additionally, MLI provided him with a prosthetic leg, so he can finally walk again, provided him with a bicycle so he can move around more efficiently now that he has a second leg.  Through MLI's Children Against Mines Program, which promotes global citizenship and connects children in countries like Afghanistan to American children through live-feed video chats, Najeebullah told MLI staff, "I can't believe MLI found me!  You have saved me.  I now can walk like a man again and I am learning computers so I can help my poor family."

Thank you again for helping us make a difference in the lives of people like Najeebullah and we hope you enjoy the month ahead.

Warmest regards,

The MLI Team
info@marshall-legacy.org
www.marshall-legacy.org 

Najebullah
Najebullah

Links:

May 2, 2011

A New Beginning for a Young Mine Survivor

Essamudin after losing a leg in a mine explosion
Essamudin after losing a leg in a mine explosion

Thank you for your continued support of MLI's humanitarian work in the world's most war-torn and mine-affected countries.  Because of your generosity, we have been able to continue helping hundreds of children who have been injured by landmines.  Approximately every 30 minutes, someone is hurt or killed by a landmine and we are so grateful to have your support as we work to stop these indiscriminate killers.

In April, MLI helped Essamudin, a 10 year-old boy from northern Afghanistan, who stepped on a landmine last year. Essamudin and his father had driven to visit the home of a relative, but when Essamudin hopped out of the passenger side door of their car, he landed on a mine.  In that instant, his life was forever changed.  He lost his right leg and, living in a rural village in Afghanistan, his family could not afford expensive medical care or even good crutches, so Essamudin was left hobbling around with just a stick to support himself.

Around the same time, a school in Essamudin's community began participating in MLI's CHildren Against Mines Program (CHAMPS) and were connected with a school in the U.S.  Through CHAMPS, the youth in both communities began communicating on a monthly basis, via video-messenger, so they could learn more about each other. As part of this program, CHAMPS youth also work together on service-learning projects to help children who have been injured by landmines.  Therefore, the schoolchildren in Afghanistan told their new friends in the U.S. about Essamudin's plight, and the American children began raising money to help him walk again.

After months of hard work, enough money was raised to purchase a new prosthetic leg for Esammudin and provide him with the rehabilitative care that he so desperately needed.  The youth in Afghanistan then worked to ensure that Essamudin was transported to a hospital that could fit him with the new leg.

Last week, thanks to their efforts and all of you who support MLI, Essamudin returned home sporting his new leg and a broad grin.  Thank you for helping to make it possible for us to help children like Essamudin!

Essamudin smiling after receiving his new leg
Essamudin smiling after receiving his new leg

Links:

Mar 15, 2011

Support MLI and help landmine survivors!

Mohammad before his surgery
Mohammad before his surgery

The Marshall Legacy Institute (MLI) is very excited to announce Global Giving's Match Day tomorrow, March 16th! All day tomorrow, GlobalGiving.org is matching at 30% all online donations up to $1,000 per donor per project!  Please consider donating to MLI's Global Giving project and help us raise money to support landmine survivors.  

In just the past two months, MLI has helped children like Mohammad, an 8 year old boy who lost both of his arms and eyesight in his left eye last year when he mistakenly picked up a landmine, thinking it was a toy.  Because of the generosity of MLI's donors, we were able to help Mohammad get prosthetic arms and eye glasses!  

In addition to the 30% match, GlobalGiving is offering a $1,000 bonus to the project that raises the most funds that day and a $1,000 bonus to the project that receives donations from the most individual donors! So please consider donating to MLI's GlobalGiving project and help us provide critically needed medical care to children who have been injured by landmines.

Mohammad after he received his new prostheses!
Mohammad after he received his new prostheses!
Jan 24, 2011

Safa - a landmine survivor update

Little Safa smiling as she holds new doll
Little Safa smiling as she holds new doll

MLI staff returned from a very successful trip to Afghanistan in December.  While there, they visited MLI's Mine Detection Dog teams in and around Kabul, and then made the trip to a rural area outside of Jalalabad where they visited Roshan High School, which participates in MLI's CHAMPS program, and where they met with several young landmine survivors, including 7 year old Safa.

Last year, while visiting her grandparents’ home outside of Jalalabad, young Safa was outside playing and gathering vegetables with her grandmother when she stepped on a landmine.  In that one instant, Safa’s life changed forever. 

Safa’s family could not afford the intensive rehabilitation or prosthetic leg that she needed, so Safa was forced to use a makeshift crutch in order to move around.  Unable to run or play with her friends, and feeling confused and scared by the entire experience, six-year old Safa was left without much of a reason to smile anymore. 

Luckily, MLI’s CHAMPS Afghanistan students in the Roshan High School, outside of Jalabad, learned of Safa’s tragedy and immediately began working to help her.  Safa’s story was shared with MLI’s CHAMPS students at Grace Christian School in Connecticut and these dedicated young people began raising money to provide her with a new leg and the rehabilitative treatment she so desperately needed.  Within a few short months, the Connecticut children had raised enough money to provide her with a new custom-fitted prosthetic leg and the students at Roshan High School began the difficult task of transporting her multiple times to and from the International Red Cross medical center, where her new leg was fitted and she received the medical care she needed.  Thanks to the combined efforts of these amazing youth, Safa now has a new leg…and a new reason to smile!  

Thank you for all of your support for MLI's programs!  It is because of people like you that children like Safa have their hope for the future restored.

Links:

Dec 4, 2010

Survivors' Assistance Update

Thanks to all of your support, and in partnership with Help the Afghan Children (HTAC), MLI’s Survivors’ Assistance Afghanistan program has found much success recently:

 An estimated 26,200 people participated in MLI and HTAC-coordinated landmine awareness meetings. No mine incidents were reported in the areas where people received awareness training.

2,500 people, including 900 women, were identified as needing assistance. Now that there is an accurate count of those requiring help, rehab and prosthetics can be provided to those who need them. 

120 mine-affected people, including 35 women, received wheelchairs, crutches, canes, and orthotic socks through MLI’s Survivors' Assistance Afghanistan program

1 boy and 2 girls were taken to Jalalabad International Red Cross Hospital to be fitted for and receive prosthetic limbs

 Due to the great benefits of the program, treasured and appreciated by those in need, MLI and HTAC are working to expand the program to other Afghan Provinces interested in participating.

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Project Leader

Tycie Horsley

Arlington, VA United States

Where is this project located?