Make Healthcare accesible to poor via Technology

 
$3,900
$46,100
Raised
Remaining
Mar 23, 2012

Internet Hotspot available at Village Zahidabad

“ Its Free and anyone from the village can use it even at homes, agriculture fields, farms and streets” — Ashfaq Khan, emphasizing on the benefits of Hotspot Internet

So the Exciting News is that Hotspot Internet is available for free of cost to the hospital staff as well as local community of village Zahidabad. It is broadband Internet via satellite (donated by Cybernet in 2006), which is transported to Zahidabad village using Nano Station 2 equipment.

                        

                                              Satellite at UM Trust

Having Hotspot Internet at rural area offers enormous potential for communication and collaboration, as more and more people are able to connect to it easily. Its like a whole new world is open to them. Local community is exploiting this opportunity for educational and learning purpose where as small Children are also using it to play games.

“ It is amazing to see how fast a five years old kid in rural learns the functionality of mobile phone and uses Internet to download games and educational material”- Atif mumtaz, Jaroka project Director 

                         Hotspot Internet available at UM Trust

                        Hotspot Internet available at UM Trust

This technology is also offering more flexibility for UM Trust operations in the field such as remote data collection and monitoring programs, remote treatment of patient and disease surveillance.

Links:

Feb 22, 2012

Newsletter February 2012

                                                       UM Healthcare Trust 

                                                           Newsletter February 2012

 

                                          Female Patient being treated at UM Trust

“Some 30,000 women die each year due to pregnancy complications and 10 times more women develop life-long, pregnancy-related disabilities. About one quarter of all children suffer from low birth weight due to maternal problems and 10 percent of those born do not reach their first birthday.”

- Source CALL – Communication & Advance Linguistic Links.


Glimpse of year 2011

Flood Relief 2010-2011- UM Trust

We are pleased to share that year 2011 proved a significant year for UM Healthcare Trust as we continue to provide support to our mission for providing better healthcare to the poor and needy in best possible ways. We are extremely appreciative to our team, funders, donors and volunteers for helping us in making it this far. The snapshot of major activities of year 2011 is as follow:

This year we have treated over 30,000 patients at our facility, making it an average of 2,500 patients monthly. Majority of the patients were women (51%) and children (30%).read more

Rural women and their struggle for healthcare

Women waiting for their turn-UM Trust

Even though most women in the urban areas of Pakistan have access to medical facilities, the health indicators of women in Pakistan are among the worst in the world; predominantly due to the large rural female population struggling for healthcare facilities. The low level of overall healthcare standards in the country that stem from this disparity can be attributed to a number of factors.read more

Links:

Jan 16, 2012

Newsletter January 2012

  

                                                               Newsletter January 2012

                                          Lady Doctors treating patients at UM facility

“UM Healthcare, which provides health care to a region of 180,000 people–it’s the sole facility there. I was moved by the difference that he has made, and how cheaply he has done it….”

Steven Ketchpel- author of Giving Back and Reuters Digital Vision Fellow Stanford.

Proud to Sustain Kidney Transplant patient         Hina Akram treated by Dr. Nasir Iqbal

We were extremely relieved to see our daughter getting better after so much suffering and I prayed to God for her long life”, reflects Hina’s father.

For six year old Hina Akram from Sadiqabad, Mardan, life changed when she was diagnosed with renal failure in April 2004. Unlike her peers in the village who have hardly seen life outside their neighborhood, Hina now visited nephrologists in the city often. There she received medication to ameliorate her pain and to treat her oedema, insufficient growth and other symptoms. Her father, Muhammad Akram, began to worry about his finances while he struggled to provide his daughter the expensive but necessary healthcare.read more

 

Giving Back features UM Trust

                                           Pharmacy at UM for patients

We feel delighted to share that UM Healthcare Trust got featured in , ” Serving Patients for $2 each in Pakistan”, in the blog GIVING BACK.

The author, Steven Ketchpel ( a Phd in Computer Science and Reuters Digital Vision Fellow at Stanford University), comprehensively describes the healthcare and relief work UM Trust is doing and its impact on saving lives of regular patients as well as the IDPs (2009) and flood victims (2010) in Pakistan. Most of these patients survive less than $1 a day salary and have seen doctor first time in their life.read more

Links:

Jan 16, 2012

UM Healthcare Trust sustains Kidney patient

“We were extremely relieved to see our daughter getting better after so much suffering and I prayed to God for her long life”, reflects Hina’s father.

For six year old Hina Akram from Sadiqabad, Mardan, life changed when she was diagnosed with renal failure in April 2004. Unlike her peers in the village who have hardly seen life outside their neighborhood, Hina now visited nephrologists in the city often. There she received medication to ameliorate her pain and to treat her oedema, insufficient growth and other symptoms. Her father, Muhammad Akram, began to worry about his finances while he struggled to provide his daughter the expensive but necessary healthcare.

Hina Ikram checked by Dr.Nair Iqbal (UM Trust)

In June 2007 Hina’s health deteriorated as she developed severe right kidney dysfunction. This was an extremely difficult time for her and her family but fortunately, their ordeal soon ended at The Kidney Center in Rawalpindi where she was one of the lucky few to receive a free successful kidney transplant. She stayed in the hospital for sixteen days and was discharged with immunosuppressive therapy.

Hina continued to receive immunosuppressive therapy for the next five months until it had to be gradually reduced to curb opportunistic infections like pneumonia which she had contracted by now.Hina’s condition has improved since then. Today, she manages to lead a normal life under the influence of medicines.

Taking vitals of Hina Ikram at UM Trust

UM Healthcare Trust has taken the responsibility of paying Hina’s medical bills since 2009. She and her family continue to vest hope in UM Trust and its Hospital to provide effective healthcare to rural Mardan. As the year draws to a close, the trust is proud to have helped with the valued support of its donors.

———–

Links:

Dec 2, 2011

Newsletter November 2011

browser

   newsletter November 2011

Children patients at UM Healthcare

“About 50 to 60 percent of young mothers that we see with children or young babies are undernourished … or they have iron deficiency or they have malnutrition.”

Dr.Qasim- Medical Officer, UM Healthcare Trust.


UM Trust continues with Flood Relief

Free Medical Camps- UM Healthcare TrustUM Healthcare Trust partners with CDRS and SHINE Humanity to continue its relentless efforts in responding to Sindh floods 2011. The flood mission was started on 1st October 2011 with the delivery of desperately needed food aid and medical aid for the affected families in Sindh. The team consisted of 2 doctors, 3 paramedics, one support staff with medicines and medical supplies and van and driver was deployed earlier and till date free mobile medical camps are conducted in districts Sangar, Mirpur Khas, Tent house, khipro, umar kot, Sabzi Mandi and Tando Allahyar.read more

Donations through mobile devices

Mobile Giving to UM Trust projectGlobal Giving has made donations easier for UM Healthcare Trust projects through simple mobile messages. You only need to walk the following steps and in no time you will be donating $10 to the UM Trust Project and will be immediately shown up in Global Giving system. The charges will also reflect on your phone bill.read more

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Organization

UM Healthcare Trust

Islamabad, Punjab, Pakistan
http://umtrust.org

Project Leader

Shamila Keyani

Islamabad, Pakistan

Where is this project located?

Map of Make Healthcare accesible to poor via Technology