Make Healthcare accesible to poor via Technology

 
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Oct 28, 2014

Newsletter UM Healthcare Trust

 

 An elderly patient giving his regards to the staff for giving him quality treatment.

“We thank the Almighty for his blessings that made us work through days and nights to win the trust of people living in the rural Mardan. We appreciate the faith of our donors that kept us going. We pay our gratitude to the staff whose dedication made this possible and the community to not only believing in us but letting us help them towards making a healthy Pakistan.” – UM healthcare trust

An elderly patient giving his regards to the staff for giving him quality treatment.

Extending our SMS (Mobile Services) to Narowal, Punjab
Female patient waiting at UM Trust

We are thrilled to announce that UM Healthcare Trust and National Rural Development Program (NRDP), a non-profit development advocacy and humanitarian organization committed to working with marginalized and vulnerable people and communities to unlock their potentials for a sustainable change…  Read more

 

 

 

Celebrating Big Day
 Kids coming in to the hospital were given candies and cookies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a moment of great pride great gratitude that we have successfully treated  more than  200,000 patients ( 53% females and 27% females)  at UM Healthcare Trust Hospital. Through consistent hard work of our team and support from our donors and friends we have managed to  provide affordable healthcare to the local communities in more than 56 adjacent villages around Zahidabad, Mardan,KP… Read more

Links:

May 22, 2014

Updates from UM Healthcare Trust

 

Seeking Healthy Behavior through FUN

This is the first time I ever got this incredible opportunity to attend an awareness session on health issues. I learned so much form this session and would definitely bring my sister-in-laws next time any awareness sessions are arranged.” – Participant.

“Can you (session facilitator- Lubna Khan) visit us every week so that we can learn more about our and family health? We want to seek more knowledge through these kinds of sessions” – Women Participant

 

Awareness session at UM Trust

Awareness session at UM Trust

For the first time, UM Healthcare Trust and Right To Play (www.righttoplay.com ), a global organization that uses the transformative power of Play  and Sport to educate and empower children facing adversity, arranged an event under the theme “Small bite, Big Threat” for community women and children at UM Trust’s Amphitheater.  The major objective of the event was to sensitize community women and children on adopting the healthy life style and preventive practices to avoid vector borne diseases. The event witnessed the participation of over 40 women and more than 70 children from various age groups and backgrounds.

During the first hour of event, an interactive awareness session was conducted with women by Right To Play’s team members- Lubna Khan, Rubina Khan and Shabana. The team followed the participatory approach to involve women in health related discussion. The major points discussed were the symptoms, side effects and preventive care related to vector borne diseases. Within five minutes of session, women felt comfortable and willingly shared their case studies with facilitators.

 

 

awareness session for female patients and community women

Awareness session for female patients and community women

“I had so much fun today. I will play these games with my siblings and friends at our village and show them how easy hand washing can be” – Hina

“We shall be strong if we do not get sick, and we would not get sick if we would wash our hands before eating anything. And we can beat all the other kids in cricket.” says Hamza to his brother.

Hamza happy after participating in fun game

Hamza happy after participating in fun game

To engage children and to teach them about importance of healthy behavior, Right To Play held fun-based sport and play based activities with children. The most amazing aspect of Right To Play’s game is their Reflect-Connect-Apply (RCA) approach which they applied after each game with all children. After each game through RCA session, children were asked to share their experiences (Reflect) and what they have learned (Connect) and key messages about the health which they will adopt in future (Apply). This approach actively involved children in the games conducted at UM Trust. Following games were played with the children:

  • Doctor Doctor (Activity) for Children
  • Flu Bug
  • Mosquito Tag
  • Wash your Hand
Fun health games with children

Fun health games with children

 

Children enjoying health game

Children enjoying health game

Children playing "Wash your hands"-health game

Children playing “Wash your hands”-health game

Overall the event was very productive.  Participants especially women individually thanked  Right To Plays team members and UM Healthcare Hospital management and requested to hold more of such workshops.

 

Disease Trend Analysis:

 

During the past quarter, UM Healthcare Trust continued to serve the deserving people of Rural Mardan, KP and provided them with primary healthcare with all its determination.

In February 2014, a total of 1649 patients were treated in UM Healthcare Hospital in which 17.88%  were men, 46.75% were women and remaining 35.35% were children.

Disease Trend February 2014

<<read more on this post>>

Links:

Feb 19, 2014

Updates from UM Healthcare Trust

Myths Proved False 

“It was astonishing to find out that Wi-Fi was available free of cost at UM Trust. Furthermore, the hospital management is offering it free for students, rural health workers and communities so that they can stay connected with outside world while living in the remote area” – Mariam Mustafa

At nursing counter patient’s vital are taken by nurse and entered into an Electronic Medical Record (EMR). Here, I saw many female patients comfortably getting their vitals measured and recorded by a male nurse. Keeping in view the culture of KP, I never expected it. I feel proud that my myth proved wrong.”- Mariam Mustafa 

                                                   Mariam interviewing female patients

                                                              Mariam interviewing female patients

I have recently joined UM Healthcare Trust as a Program Coordinator and it was my very first visit to Mardan district and to UM Healthcare Trust Hospital. Like every other common Pakistani citizen, I have some built-in assumptions about the rigid culture of rural areas of KP and a charity hospitals (mostly called ghost hospitals) running at remote locations. To be honest, I was quite scared of going into a rural location in KP due to the security situation in the country and the stories I had heard from people and media.

In order to witness the reality especially with respect to healthcare in the field, I joined my team members to visit UM Trust on 14th February, 2014. During the whole journey, I thought of UM Healthcare Trust as a small typical rural primary healthcare facility  but on reaching the hospital it felt as if I have jumped into completely different and advance healthcare world.  Close to entrance there is a built-in Amphitheater in hospital which serves multi-purpose. Mostly training are held at this theater and at the same time it serves as the waiting area for females while  male patients usually wait  for their turn in lawn or waiting room .

Female patients waiting at Amphitheater at UM Trust

Female patients waiting at Amphitheater at UM Trust

“ Every single person working in the hospital is a true example of empathy. They are truly committed and available for the core cause of UM Healthcare Trust Hospital.”- Mariam Mustafa

First Myth – No queue culture in rural areas

Read full story at : http://www.umtrust.org/event/myths-proved-wrong/

 

Disease Trend of January 2014

District Mardan, KP, is known for its hospitality, despite of the fact that most people living in the rural areas are below poverty line. Most of them earn through agriculture and yet earn less than $1 a day.

UM Health Trust is providing them basic and sustainable healthcare by providing consultancy, basic examination and medication to more than 150-200 patients daily.

                                     January 2014

In the month of January 2014, a total of 1615 patients were treated.

Among those 363 (22.47%) were male patients, 679 (42.04%) were female patients and 573 (35.47%) were children.

Most of the patients showed symptoms of encountering infectious agents due to change in climate. Poor hygiene practices and low habitual standard of living resulted in many Gastroenteritis cases.

Patients suffering from Dyspepsia were also observed with elevated digestive enzymes.

District Mardan, KP, is known for its hospitality, despite of the fact that most people living in the rural areas are below poverty line. Most of them earn through agriculture and yet earn less than $1 a day.

UM Health Trust is providing them basic and sustainable healthcare by providing consultancy, basic examination and medication to more than 150-200 patients daily.

In the month of January 2014, a total of 1615 patients were treated.

Among those 363 (22.47%) were male patients, 679 (42.04%) were female patients and 573 (35.47%) were children.

Most of the patients showed symptoms of encountering infectious agents due to change in climate. Poor hygiene practices and low habitual standard of living resulted in many Gastroenteritis cases.

Patients suffering from Dyspepsia were also observed with elevated digestive enzymes.

Links:

Nov 19, 2013

NEGLECTED- Not Any More

I always took my son as a normal child who suffered from severe weakness due to serious spiritual problems. Since I couldn’t afford to visit hospitals in city, the only choice I had was to take my son to holy shrines for prayers for his healthy life. ”—Bilal’s mother. 

No one in the family had a clue that 3 years old Bilal among 4 children was suffering from Marasmus, a severe malnutrition disease which is most common in children below 2 years of age but may be found in advance age. It is manifested by severe wasting of subcutaneous muscles and fats leading to diminished tone of muscles,  excessive weight loss, growth retardation and failure of vital organs such as kidney, liver etc. Marasmus is most commonly due to dietary deficiency or some time due to severely restricted food intake.  It is directly linked to illiteracy of mothers, low family income and larger family size.

Since Bilal’s mother was hardly able breastfed him excpet for first few months due repeated pregnancies in two years intervals, he was very weak and people thought of his as victim of serious spiritual problem called Aseeb/Sooray. To make the situation worst, due to extreme poverty and illitearcy,  Bilal was not taken to any private clinic and tertiary care hospital rather he was taken to shirnes and holy tombs for recovery and prayers. This played a critical role in detoriating his condition.

Bilal was brought to UM Healthcare Trust after his mother learned about our free and quality medical service from her family friends. For the first time, Bilal was accurately diagnosed in our hospital with Masarum. He is now being given best and free treatment for his health restoration and his mother is briefed on marasmus by our doctors. She is  also strictly advised to make frequent visits to UM Trust so that  the baby condition is observed regulalry by our doctors.

Marasmus is a serious worldwide problem that involves more than 50 million children younger than 5 years. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 49% of the 10.4 million deaths occurring in children younger than 5 years in developing countries are associated with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). Reference – Medscape 

Links:

Jul 15, 2013

Updates from UM Healthcare Trust

Unexpected Happiness

“I was amazed to find out that in today’s era, a printed photograph of their child can be luxury for them as they can not afford to spend money on pictures. I could not say “No” to their request for the pictures, and allowed them to take all. “ – Dr. Qasim Ali

Happiness comes in different flavors. Some buy it, others struggle for it, and there live few who get it for free and unexpected. There are still people in this world who are living in dark ages; however, their measure of happiness is priceless, innocent and giving. Free “Give-take” concept is involved without causing any harm and therefore leaving both teams in a win-win situation e.g. making others happy makes one happy and content without paying any penny.

Quoting a live incident from UM Healthcare Trust

a) Recently UM Healthcare Team’s photographer took a few photographs of the children, patients of Zahidabad district. The team decided to develop these photo shoots and put them on the Notice Board of UM Healthcare Trust Hospital in order to bring colour to the place and catch attention of the patients waiting for their turn. However People of Zahidabad on seeing these pictures got so enthralled, elated and excited that they started taking off these pictures saying:

“This is my daughter’s picture hanging there on the wall. She is looking wonderful. Can I please take it off and show it to my wife and hang it on my wall? I have never seen a printed picture of my child before” - Patient at UM Trust

Female patients and children waiting for their turn for medical checkup

Female patients and children waiting for their turn for medical checkup

Encountering such innocent requests leaves a person numb, as to in today’s fast pace world, there still live a few who get to see their family’s footage for the first time and for them it counts no less than a miracle because they are so poor they can’t think of anything else except struggling for their life to keep their families alive. In short their pockets do not allow them to keep a camera and relive memories. Thus coming across such joy for UM Team serves as chance because not every day such awe-moments take place scoring a win-win. They were allowed to take off as many pictures as they desired.

b) Similarly once a female patient was having a very common disease i.e. Temperature. She came to the hospital for the very first time. She was treated well and was given the required medicines to heal up soon. The next day she came to the hospital again, this time feeling very energetic, excited and happy, demanding to see the doctor who checked her. On meeting the doctor she told him that she has brought a gift for him. The doctor of course got worried and told her that madam there is no concept of accepting bribes; it’s inappropriate and not appreciated. The woman demanded that she has to give it to him as he had saved her life. The women when opened her tightly curled hands, presented the doctor with an Egg, saying

“I am giving my one day breakfast to you as a token of appreciation for saving my life” - Patient at UM Trust

Patients at UM Trust
Patients at UM Trust

Stories like these leave a person in admiration and shock. One can think of so many things as to why an Egg but each thought reflects a smile.

Patient Treatment from Jan to June 2013

Patient treatments

From the year 2013 (Jan-June) UM Healthcare Trust treated 10,197 patients, of which a gigantic 4,563 were Female patients. Children on second number were 3,760 and the rest were male patients reaching a figure of 1,874. The number of Female patients and Children is more in comparison with male patients. Therefore UM Healthcare Trust carries continues to provide necessary health facilities in order to better facilitate and educate both mother and child about keeping healthy.

Disease Trends

For the year 2013 (Jan-June), UM Healthcare tracked over 47 distinct diseases for its patients. Following are the top most diseases faced by male, female and children patients for the past 6 months i.e. January to June 2013.

Female Patients

  • URTI/LRTI (780)
  • Gastroenteritis (501)
  • Dyspepsia/Ulcer  (786)
  • Hypertension (724)

 Children

  • Gastroenteritis (1240)
  • URTI/LRTI (1154)
  • Skin Infections (303)

Male Patients

  • URTI/LRTI (410)
  • Dyspepsia/Ulcer (317)
  • Hypertension (297)
  • Gastroenteritis (217)

With generous support of our donors, we hope to carry out the healthcare services to needy and poor in an efficient way.

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Organization

UM Healthcare Trust

Islamabad, Punjab, Pakistan
http://umtrust.org

Project Leader

Shamila Keyani

Islamabad, Pakistan

Where is this project located?

Map of Make Healthcare accesible to poor via Technology