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Jun 17, 2010

Postcard from April: I ran a 10k to Count Malaria Out and finished dead last!

CFWshops co-sponsored a 10k race in Nairobi to mark World Malaria Day on April 24, 2010. The worldwide theme was “Count Malaria Out.” The sponsors aimed to fund and distribute 200,000 mosquito nets in Kenya. Since CFWshops has set up 80 health store franchises in Kenya, it is well-positioned to get many bednets out to people through a variety of means. Chris Blattman (Yale) has a pretty good summary of the debate around the various free vs pay strategies that work best to get everyone sleeping under a bednet (http://chrisblattman.com/2008/03/17/the-best-bednets-in-life-are-free/) if you are curious.

I arrived at Nyayo stadium early Saturday morning. About 100 Kenyans were already there decked out in race jerseys and white sneakers. Everyone was young and buff. I heard the howl of an airhorn and dashed off to the start line, where racers were already huddled.

I should have known something was amiss. I looked over the shoulder of the person on my right. He was poised to start his race watch. Same for the guy on my left. A few in front were down in a three-point stance. “You guys in a hurry?” I asked. One looked me over and smirked. “Don’t try to keep up with us. If you try, you won’t finish.” “Nonsense. I run a 10k every week.” A few others looked back at me and said nothing. I wondered what they were thinking. What I was thinking for just a fleeting moment was how cool it would be to win a race in Kenya as the sole white guy against 100 Kenyans. An image for the next Dos Equis commercial popped in my head. I imagined the Dos Equis mystery man running in slow motion with the voice over, “I once beat the Kenyans when I raced… In Kenya!”

The gun fired and everyone jumped into action. 100 Kenyan boys and girls sprinted away from the start line and ten seconds later, I found myself all alone in the back even though I was running at full speed – for a muzungo. One minute later, all I could see where the backs of heads. Not even out of the stadium yet, and I was panting.

I thought about the Haiku I'd posted a day earlier on Facebook: “Running a 10K, will altitude do me in, or Nairobi smog?”

Neither. The competition did, it turned out.

Still within sight of the stadium, the last girl I had any chance of catching sped ahead and was just a tiny blip on the horizon. I estimate she - the 2nd slowest racer - was doing 7 minute miles.

Five minutes into the race, even the back-of-the-pack ambulance gave up on me and drove ahead. I was totally alone. I wanted to laugh, but I was too out of breath.

Climbing the first hill, construction workers egged me on. “Stay strong!” was a common mantra, although there were a few jibes of “Come man, start running!” here and there.

By the fifteenth minute things actually got worse. People started lapping me as if I was standing still and the race staff pointing the way just shook their heads. “Poor guy."

I managed to finish with a respectable 10k time of 52 minutes. Everyone else finished in under 40 minutes! This marked a first for me – being dead last. It was a fun, humiliating experience I will always cherish.

Afterward, I realized that the involvement of two former Olympic gold medalists (Tom Ngugi and Charles Asati Mumesu) as organizers probably had a little to do with why all the runners were so fast. Both run training clubs for future Olympic runners and sent their lads and lasses to the race. Charles introduced himself to me after and we chatted a bit. He was quite interested in getting his training facility listed on GlobalGiving and planned to talk to Spencer Ochieng (CFWshops director) about it. I got him to sign my race bib and write his phone number so we can stay in touch. That’s one bib I’ll save!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ngugi http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Asati http://chrisblattman.com/2008/03/17/the-best-bednets-in-life-are-free/

Comments:
  • AlisonF
    AlisonF Fantastic post...I laughed so hard it brought tears to my eyes. You just got another supporter. Stay strong, Mystery Man!
    • 4 years ago
    •  · 
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Project Leader

Greg Starbird Starbird

Vice President, The HealthStore Foundation®
Nairobi, Kenya

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