Fight Famine in the Horn of Africa

 
$4,838
$37,647
Raised
Remaining
Jul 23, 2012

Your Impact: An Update on Hunger

Your Impact: Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia
Your Impact: Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia

UPDATE: CRISIS IN THE HORN OF AFRICA

Fighting for food security in the midst of drought & conflict, WFP provides hope for millions.

As you know, a humanitarian crisis developed in the Horn of Africa throughout the latter half of 2011. A severe drought in the region, coupled with regional conflict, reached unprecedented proportions affecting more than 13 million people. Last year, WFP USA asked for your help and you responded.

Today, there is good news and bad news.

 

Thanks to you, 9.8 million people in the region have been reached with direct food assistance since WFP began emergency operations in July 2011. In some areas, food assistance requirements will be met through local purchases to stimulate local markets while ensuring critical nutritional support. This is happening in Ethiopia, where WFP assessments indicate a decline in the number of Ethiopians in need – from 3.5 million to 2.6 million.

You are making a difference in the Horn of Africa!

While seasonal rains have begun, several consecutive seasons of drought still leave millions of people requiring food assistance until the next harvest. Conflict in Somalia and South Sudan led many to flee their homes in search of safety and the critical support found in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya. This influx of refugees places stress on the camps and WFP has committed to continuing food and micronutrient distributions throughout the summer.

At WFP USA, we know that battling hunger requires the participation of individuals, organizations, governments and the private sector. Together, we are building a stronger future for those in crisis.

Thank you for providing hope for children, families and communities in the Horn of Africa!

Links:

Nov 6, 2012

Support Still Needed in the Horn of Africa

Your Impact: A Child
Your Impact: A Child's Smile

Drought in the Horn of Africa, coupled with conflict in Somalia, has affected over13 million people. WFP is implementing food operations in five countries in the region (Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Kenya and Uganda). This page brings together a range of information on the hunger crisis in the Horn and WFP's response.

 

  • · Although average to above average rainfall is expected soon in the Horn, 3.76 million are considered food insecure in Ethiopia and 2.1 million are experiencing an acute food security crisis in Somalia. Crisis levels of food insecurity are requiring immediate food assistance.

Crippling droughts that the Horn has experienced these past two years have put the region at risk for a prolonged humanitarian crisis well into next year.

  • · WFP is providing food assistance for 7.8 million people in five countries and is working towards reaching a target figure of 10.9 million with food.
  • · WFP is moving life-saving food and nutritional products by sea, air and road into Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia to address hunger among the most vulnerable.
  • · In Somalia, WFP is working to address both immediate food needs and build longer-term resilience of vulnerable people. Our operations reached 1.5 million vulnerable people in 2011, many of them women and children. With WFP’s help, access to water and markets has more than tripled in 2012.
  • · In Ethiopia, WFP covers the needs of 2.6 million through its Relief Programme while the remaining 800,000 people who are food insecure receive food assistance from the Joint Emergency Operation Programme. The School Meals program also feeds nearly 700,000 school children in Ethiopia. WFP plans to assist 6.5 million people spanning every region of Ethiopia in 2012. 
  • · In Kenya, where 2.1 million people are food insecure, WFP is reaching nearly 2 million people with emergency food aid – this includes over half a million refugees in the Dadaab and Kakuma camps. WFP also aims to help 10,000 small-scale farmers by the end of 2013.

Links:

Jan 23, 2012

How Drought Affected Two Farmers Very Differently

ETHIOPIA

Dadij and Senite live in the Doba Region in Eastern Ethiopia, about 20 km apart from each other. The key difference between them is that Dadji has been taking part in a land rehabilitation project and Senite has not. This meant that their experience of this year's drought in the Horn of Africa was quite different.

Dadij Yadete (left in photo above) managed to get through the drought in Ethiopia relatively unscathed this year, largely thanks to the work he has done in recent years on his land through an environmental rehabilitation project called MERET. Senite lives only a score of kilometres away, but her village has not been involved in the same sort of work. Her experience of the drought was much more difficult. We asked Dadij and Senite about their last few months. Here are their answers: 

Senite

How have you been affected by this year’s drought?

My life is very difficult. As my husband died, I grew some sorghum with the help of my children and my neighbours but it was not enough. I was obliged to go to the next city to collect water and do other works for some people to survive. In addition, we received some food aid but I don’t like receiving aid, I am ashamed of it. 

Dadij

How have you been affected by this year's drought?
I didn’t have any problems at all this year and haven’t been affected by the drought. I started participating in the MERET project seven years ago. Back then I grew some maize and barley but it wasn’t enough, I was dependent on food aid. Some people brought me seedlings of apple trees and even though I was hesitant - I hadn’t seen apples before - I started planting them. By selling apples I can make a lot of money. We never used to buy new clothes. Now I can. And food too.

Are droughts in your area becoming more frequent?
I don’t know; I am now growing ten different crops. Apart from the apples, I grow coffee, maize, peppers and many other things. We also worked a lot in the hills around the village, building terraces and dams. And we planted trees, so we have no food or water shortage. 

Managing the land - MERET

Through Ethiopia's MERET project, which is supported by WFP, communities that are at risk of hunger take part in activities to stop land degradation. They reforest barren hillsides, restore springs and rainwater ponds and construct agricultural terraces. This helps make communities much more resilient to prolonged drought and other climate-related shocks

Links:

Jan 23, 2012

The Situation

HORN OF AFRICA CRISIS:

Drought in the Horn of Africa, coupled with conflict in Somalia, has affected over 13 million people. WFP is implementing food operations in five countries in the region (Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Kenya and Uganda). This page brings together a range of information on the hunger crisis in the Horn and WFP's emergency response.

  • The rains have started in the Horn but several consecutive seasons of drought have left millions of people requiring food assistance until the next harvest comes in.
  • WFP is providing food assistance for 7.8 million people in five countries and is working towards reaching a target figure of 10.9 million with food.
  • WFP is moving life-saving food and nutritional products by sea, air and road into Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia to address hunger among the most vulnerable.
  • WFP is providing highly fortified supplementary food products for children to prevent malnutrition in the first two years of life (when it can lead to irreversible damage to children’s minds and bodies.)
  • In Somalia, WFP is focusing its efforts on distributing food to as many people as it can reach in areas which it has access. We will scale up to meet the urgent food needs of some 1.5 million people in those regions.
  • In Ethiopia WFP is currently reaching 3.8 million people with emergency food assistance. Taking into account its other programmes, WFP will feed 7.1 million people in 2011.
  • In Kenya, Where 3.75 million people are affected by drought, WFP is reaching nearly 2 million people with emergency food aid – this includes over half a million refugees in the Dadaab and Kakuma camps.
  • About Project Reports

    Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

    If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating or by subscribing to this project's RSS feed.

    Retired Project

    This project is no longer accepting donations.

    Still want to help?
    Support another project run by World Food Program USA that needs your help, such as:

    Organization

    World Food Program USA

    Washington, DC, United States
    http://www.wfpusa.org

    Project Leader

    Sandy Coburn

    Washington, DC United States

    Where is this project located?

    Map of Fight Famine in the Horn of Africa