Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

 
$23,154
$26,846
Raised
Remaining
Jun 17, 2014

A Very Special Baby

Baby Beaver on arrival, one week old
Baby Beaver on arrival, one week old

"I have a gift for you!" exclaimed Mark Naniot of Wild Instincts, a wildlife hospital in northern Wisconsin, when he called.  He had just received a newborn orphaned beaver kit from a member of the public, umbilical cord still attached.  Mark knows that Fellow Mortals works regularly with beaver and that we have a single beaver in care we hope to put with another before eventual release back to the wild. 

We decided to have Mark stabilize the baby at his hospital before having the little one transferred down to us, as it would involve a more than 6-hour travel time for the delicate orphan.  Any newborn animal is fragile and we have found newborn beaver to be especially susceptible to complications due to inability to thermoregulate and stomach upset from change in formula, so it made sense not to add any additional stress to what an orphaned wild baby was already experiencing from being separated from its parents.  One week later, after the baby had stabilized, volunteers from Wild Instincts met our volunteer at a half-way point to hand off the special patient for transport the rest of the way to Fellow Mortals for care. 

Fellow Mortals has cared for over 40,000 wild animals in the last nearly 30 years, but only 7 infant beaver, making this little one a very special patient.  As soon as (she) arrived, we began the process of getting her adjusted to her new caregivers and surroundings and getting her back on schedule for feedings and bathing (beaver go to the bathroom in the water and must have access to water after every feeding).

The baby has been with us nearly two weeks now and is doing quite well, having gained close to 200 grams from her admit weight and looking and acting like a healthy baby.  Little bites of willow and yam are enjoyed inbetween formula feedings and her baths are getting bigger and deeper.  (We haven't yet determined the sex, which will be done by x-ray when the little one is about a month old.  Sex organs are internal in beaver.)

In the wild, beaver stay with their parents until they are two years old, when they leave to find territories and build lodges of their own.  Anyone who has ever raised a baby beaver understands exactly why this is so, as the kits cannot be left unsupervised without getting into trouble if they venture alone into deep water.  The yearling beaver are essentially mom and dad's babysitters during their time at home.  Beaver family are very close-knit and this intelligent species spends hours every day in social grooming, as the animals are very tactile.

In July 2012, Fellow Mortals released another hand-raised baby who had been paired with a yearling.  Today, they are doing well at the pond where they were released.  We are still waiting to see if they might have had babies of their own this year.  The link mentioned provides more information about their story.

Making the kind of commitment it takes to raise beaver from infants to release is only possible because of the support of special individuals and foundations who provide the funds to build the specialized habitats needed by these aquatic mammals, and the donations that help purchase the food consumed by these unique animals.  One beaver will eat a pound of spinach, two large yams, an ear of corn and two apples every day while in care.  The cost of food alone for one beaver in rehabilitation is nearly $5,000. 

While we have large habitats with pools deep enough for diving, our dream is to build an even larger aquatic mammal habitat for this special species.  We'll keep you updated as this project progresses.

Time to sign off for now, the baby beaver's next feeding is just two minutes away!

Bath time
Bath time
Sweet dreams
Sweet dreams

Links:

Apr 7, 2014

New Life, Renewed Promise

Hand-feeding infant squirrel
Hand-feeding infant squirrel

With the warmth of spring, the door literally opens to a new beginning for dozens of wild creatures who spent the winter healing.  In the last couple of weeks, we have returned red-tailed hawks back to their homes, set migrating songbirds and ducks on their way to their breeding grounds and moved more animals along the path back to eventual freedom.  Give yourself a pat on the back for helping to make this possible!

The first babies of the year came to Fellow Mortals as a large nest of eight 'pinkie' squirrels weighing just 2/3 of an ounce.   These little ones are helpless if something happens to their nest or mom and are some of the most critical patients we see, requiring frequent and late-night feedings and strict hygiene to keep them healthy.  We're happy to say that 10 days later they are all gaining weight and doing well.

After the first squirrels came our first orphaned owls, with two nestling who were injured after their nest was blown out of a tall pine tree.  The babies were alone for awhile before they were found and were very hungry, as well as injured.  One baby had a sprained 'ankle;' the other sustained fractures to both ulnas (a bone in the wing).  Wild creatures are incredibly resilent and both little ones responded well to treatment and are healing while eating up to 12 mice each per day.  They are nearly ready to join our foster owl, Alberta, who adopts the young owls who need us, providing an important role model for them as they learn to act like an owl, talk like an owl, and hunt so that they can survive when they have matured for release.

After the long harsh winter, the first babies of the year are a welcome sign of the awakening earth, filling us with anticipation for all that is to come.  Every year we make a new promise to the wild ones who will need us--to provide the best nutrition, care, facilities and medical care possible, in order to give each individual a real chance to heal and grow and return to the wild where it belongs.  Thanks to you, we know this is a promise we can keep.

Orphaned great horned owls
Orphaned great horned owls
Wood ducks soon to be released
Wood ducks soon to be released
Red-tailed hawk returns to her home
Red-tailed hawk returns to her home
Jan 6, 2014

Moments, Memories & Miracles

Starving Sandhill Crane with grommet on bill
Starving Sandhill Crane with grommet on bill

The frigid winter air in rural Wisconsin is 20 degrees below zero. 

The last few days we've been busy providing extra shelter, extra bedding, extra food. to the animals in our care outdoors.  This means putting up tarps and heavy plastic over exposed areas of outside caging, giving the deer and rabbits mounds of timothy hay to curl up into (and munch if they like), providing the squirrels extra bedding to make their nest boxes cozy and putting heat pads in with the hawks and owls so that food and water stay thawed and accessible to them.  It's sweet to visit the deer barn in the morning and see all the little impressions of resident wildlife who shared the warmth during the night.  We know we have opossum and a stray cat who visit with the deer.

New patients arrive every day, including two screech owl siblings who were found tangled in the snow squabbling over a morsel of food, and a starving red-breasted merganser, who quickly adapted to fishing minnows out of his bowl when finally able to feed himself.  Two beautiful cottontail rabbits, a male and female, were injured when they were hit by cars and suffered head trauma.  They and we are fortunate that kind people took the time to rescue them when they were found injured and all are doing well at this writing.

Although we haven't yet tabulated patient information for 2013, we know there was an increase in the amount of animals we had in care, including increased numbers of both birds of prey (hawks, owls and others) and rabbits and squirrels.

Going through the individual admit records gives us a chance to remember every individual life that passed through our hands, including those who are pictured below.  The little rabbit in the snow?  He was raised from just one day old, after he was orphaned when his mother was killed.  He was born late in the year, so is overwintering with two others.  The sandhill crane was admitted starving after he accidentally stabbed a rubber grommet while feeding and his bill was rendered useless.  The squirrel is one of many late babies who enjoyed Christmas morning with special treats, including dried apple on a stick, while the red-tailed hawk was released during one of our 'warm' spells, along with two great-horned owls, recovered from their injuries.  The posse of common nighthawks shown at feeding time include some permanent birds and others who will be released in the spring, and the deer kissing--they live at Fellow Mortals permanently.

We can't begin to find the words to say 'thank you' for helping to make so many happy endings possible, and for helping us to continue our work--even during the harshest days of winter.   May your kindness to the innocent creatures who need you warm your heart in the coldest times.  Happy New Year from your Fellow Mortals, wild and human.

Juvenile Cottontail rabbit--raised from 1 day old
Juvenile Cottontail rabbit--raised from 1 day old
Resident deer
Resident deer
Grey Squirrel
Grey Squirrel
Feeding Overwintering Common Nighthawks
Feeding Overwintering Common Nighthawks
Release of Red-tailed Hawk
Release of Red-tailed Hawk

Links:

Oct 14, 2013

One Squirrel's Story

Injured Cottontail Rabbit at admit
Injured Cottontail Rabbit at admit

All you have to do is look at the faces of the interns right before releasing the hawks to freedom to see how 'success' is most easily measured in wildlife rehabilitation.  We are excited when the day comes that an animal who came to us starving or injured can go home again, and know that it is 'good bye,' but once in awhile, we get to say 'hello' again...

Buddy came into our lives over three years ago, after she was found injured and starving with an injury to her mouth and jaw.  At the hospital on her arrival on 3/22/09, x-rays revealed that a b.b. had lodged in the little squirrel's jaw and caused her teeth to become misaligned and maloccluded, making it impossible for her to eat.  Another had just missed her spine.

Buddy spent nearly two years in rehabilitation.  The pellet’s proximity to one eye made it impossible to remove, but regular teeth clipping gradually brought Buddy's teeth into alignment and she grew plump and beautiful once she was able to feed herself.  In the fall of 2011, we opened the door to her cage and Buddy left captivity to find her place in the wild.  Since Fellow Mortals has fox squirrels on site and we hoped to monitor her condition, we gave her a nest box  near to the hospital in a lone oak.

We didn’t see Buddy  for several weeks after release and of course we worried—then one day in November of 2011 we were excited to see Buddy in the courtyard helping herself to the treats we put out daily for the birds, squirrels and rabbits.

Buddy lived in the 'wilds' of Fellow Mortals for over two years, until the injury that initially brought her to us brought her back into care.  We will always be grateful that she had the opportunity to live a life of her own choosing, and feel so privileged that—when she was given the chance to leave, she chose to spend the rest of her life with us.  She was never tame, never allowed us to approach too closely, yet we shared our lives.  

The rare experience of being able to follow our patients after release occurs every so often, and gives us hope that many of the animals we never see again are also living long, happy lives in the wild.

Thank you for your gifts which provide the place that makes these stories possible.

New friends
New friends
Robin release
Robin release
Buddy Girl, Fellow Mortals Mascot
Buddy Girl, Fellow Mortals Mascot
Immature Great horned owl
Immature Great horned owl
Release Day
Release Day

Links:

Jul 15, 2013

Summertime at Fellow Mortals

Red-tailed Hawks on the day of Release
Red-tailed Hawks on the day of Release

It's July 14, and we're at the peak of our busy season!  Every room and cage is filled, and the outside habitats have a waiting list for the many patients growing up or recovering inside the hospital.

Nearly 500 animals are currently in care, including dozens of orphaned cottontails, songbirds, ground and tree squirrels, ducks and geese, hawks and owls, woodchucks and more...

Every day that Fellow Mortals is able to provide care for injured and orphaned wildlife--and accept new patients from the public--is a cause for celebration, Thanks to You!

Even as we continue hand-feeding the tinest newborn mammals, or newly-hatched birds, we are also busy releasing those who have 'graduated' from critical and nursery care to being able to survive in the wild.  Just today, we released flying, grey and 13-lined squirrels and robins, grackles, house sparrows and a woodpecker.

One very special release just a few days ago was that of two red-tailed hawks.  Both had come to us with fractured wings, but one in particular was in very critical condition, its 'fingers' (the phalanges of the wing) smashed past surgical repair.  It was also an older injury; infection had set in and we wondered if the bird would lose the tip of its wing. Despite the odds, we decided to do what we could to battle the infection and keep the bird quiet to see if healing was possible. Not only did the bird not lose the wing, but he flew beautifully on release!

Every one of the animals you help has a special story.  Each one wants to live and, more than that, be free. Thank you for all the Happy Endings you make possible.

Day old Eastern Cottontail rabbit
Day old Eastern Cottontail rabbit
Foster Mama Mallard
Foster Mama Mallard 'Snow' with orphaned duckling
Orphaned brothers--Grey Squirrels
Orphaned brothers--Grey Squirrels
Nestling White-breasted Nuthatch
Nestling White-breasted Nuthatch
Infant 13-lined Ground Squirrel
Infant 13-lined Ground Squirrel

Links:

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Organization

Project Leader

Yvonne Wallace Blane

Lake Geneva, Wisconsin United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital