Essential training for Pakistani aid workers

 
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$49,911
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Jan 3, 2014

Disaster Risk Reduction in Kashmir's Schools

Momina and her mother. Photo: RedR/Usman Ghani
Momina and her mother. Photo: RedR/Usman Ghani

For children in Pakistan-administered Kashmir, making the journey of an hour or more to school each morning is fraught with risks. When they get there, the school is not the safe haven that all children deserve.

Life here is only just returning to normal after the magnitude 7.6 earthquake of 2005, which killed 73,000 people, smashed homes and infrastructure, and obliterated the economies of hundreds of villages. Many communities are also at risk of landslides and heavy snows. Roads are often closed, and mountain passes blocked. 

Momina was eight years old when the earthquake struck.  She is from Muzaffrabad, one of the three districts worst affected by the quake in Pakistan. She was unwell and did not attend school the day of the earthquake. She remembers what happened when it first hit,

‘I walked to the end of my street with my mother to buy medicine.  My mother asked me to go home, give it to my grandmother, and return quickly.  On the way back, I started to feel the ground moving under my feet. Then suddenly I saw the buildings around me collapsing.  There was so much dust, I couldn’t see an inch in front of my face.  It was like the dust you see in television programmes about 9/11.’

Momina’s uncle found her and took her to safety, an open space in a nearby park where she was reunited with her mother. Most of her family assembled there before nightfall.

Her elder brother died in his school that day along with 18,000 other school children across Kashmir.

While some children died instantly when their school buildings collapsed, the tragedy is that many others could have survived if their schools had practiced simple evacuation drills.  

The threat of natural disaster hangs over these children. Seismic activity in the region is an on-going reality, and minor quakes occur regularly in some valleys. Hundreds of Kashmiri children also die in flash-floods, landslides, and avalanches. Pakistan has invested in reconstructing public buildings which comply with modern earthquake safety standards.  But until now, little or no money has been spent on emergency training. Thanks to RedR supporters, this is changing. 

This Autumn, RedR ran Disaster Risk Reduction training for teachers and local aid workers working with children in Kashmir. We are giving them critical skills like fire safety and first aid, which they then pass on to school children.

Bushra Azad is a teacher at Momina’s school in Muzaffrabad. She was 16, and at college when the earthquake hit.

‘When I remember the earthquake I am still horrified – I can picture the building collapsing, and then everything was black. When I regained consciousness I was in the playground.  Someone had pulled me out.  I had minor injuries to my leg. Around 60-70 people had died.  The building was completely destroyed. I had no idea there were safety measures which could be taken.’

She has recently received RedR training, which she has used to show her pupils how to behave in the event of an earthquake, fire or flood.

‘Now I’ve been trained, I can see it’s really good for young children to know about safety and first aid.  These children can now educate their communities, and share with them the safety measures they’ve learnt.  Not all parents here are literate.  It is really important to teach these skills in schools. The skills will stay in the community, and help us all in the long-term.’

Simple knowledge makes all the difference in a crisis. Bushra remembers two key examples, which she is certain will stick in the childrens’ minds:

‘I taught my class to stand in the corner in the case of an earthquake, because this is the strongest part of the room, structurally. Here in the city, children must stay away from all electricity cables in the street – many people were electrocuted in the earthquake when cables fell on them.’

RedR Trainers pass on these and other nuggets of life-saving information to teachers in Kashmir, who then lead training days in schools.  Knowing when to adopt the brace position and how to seek cover under a desk or in an outside space means more children will survive. Schools which conduct regular evacuation drills and draw up safety plans, are immeasurably better prepared for natural disasters.

Tasaduq Hussain Khan works as a school teacher in Bagh District, a mountainous rural area.

‘When the earthquake struck I asked all the children to come into the middle of the room, and gradually vacate the building.  But I could see the walls cracking, and the roof fell in as they collapsed.  I started shouting, and people from nearby houses came to help me rescue the children.’

Although he had no training, Tasaduq had the presence of mind to evacuate his classroom and prevent the children from panicking. Only 4 died in his school, and 40 were injured.  However, he lost his three year old son, who was at home that day with his grandmother.

My son was born after we’d been married for 8 years.  He was very dear to us and I have been immensely depressed about losing him.  At times I feel lost.  The trauma has changed me permanently.  If we had all had the awareness of what to do when an earthquake struck, we would have saved many more lives’.

He is very grateful that both he and his six year old son, Adeel have been taught how to deal with a range of natural disaster scenarios by RedR.

‘The other day it rained very heavily.  There was lightning outside, and my son said, ‘let’s shut the doors and  windows’.  The training is good, I was impressed by his awareness.’

Adeel enjoyed the mock drills which were conducted by his class teacher, and is proud of his new knowledge:

‘I have learnt to protect myself from earthquakes.  I have learnt to stay inside when lightning strikes, and when there is thunder. We learnt to get underneath our desks, and get to a safe place.  I have also learnt when there is fire to extinguish it with mud or sand.

Whenever I learn a new thing at school, I go home and tell it to my mother.’

Basic planning can be so effective. So much of what we teach is not complex, but can be easily remembered in a crisis. Making this knowledge part of the culture in schools will have a huge impact for the children and their parents in this disaster-prone area.

RedR training has made people in Kashmir understand the importance the role they must play when earthquakes and other hazards hit. The first few days after a disaster are called the ‘Golden Days’.  They are a critical window during which many deaths can still be prevented.  It is the local people who have the power to save the most lives. 

Momina
Momina's education is very important to her.
Adeel practices taking shelter under his desk.
Adeel practices taking shelter under his desk.
Adeel learning about how to stay earthquake-safe
Adeel learning about how to stay earthquake-safe
All photos copyright RedR/Usman Ghani
All photos copyright RedR/Usman Ghani
Sep 12, 2013

Results in 2012-13 Financial Year

Over financial year 2013-13, RedR UK trained 813 people in 5 locations throughout Pakistan. About 79% of the trainees were staff of a National NGO or International NGO. A further 9% of participants came from Pakistani local government departments to beneifit from RedR's expertise in disaster preparedness.

The vast majority (97%) of trainees were Pakistani nationals, meaning that RedR helped to directly build the capacity of aid workers to respond to disasters in the country.

Training courses and facilitation were consistently highly-rated:

  • 97% of trainees rated the course facilitation as 'Good' to 'Excellent'
  • 96% said the course's relevance to aid work was 'Good' to 'Excellent'
  • 96% rated the effectiveness of the training materials as 'Good' to 'Excellent'

Courses took place in Mirpur Khas (Sindh), Hyderabad, Peshawar, Muzzafarabad, Karachi, and Islamabad. Among the many local and international aid agencies and UN agencies whose work has been made more effective through RedR training in Pakistan were Save the Children, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, UNICEF, Asia Cooperation Dialogue, Pathfinder International.

The courses that we ran in Pakistan last year were centred around Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Disaster Management (DM). Our DRR/DM courses in 2012-13 included:

  • Fire Fighting and First Aid
  • Crisis and Security Management
  • Personal Safety and Security
  • DRR Orientation Training
  • Driver Safety and First Aid
  • Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM)
  • Security Training for Journalists
  • Search, Rescue and Evacuation
  • Fire Safety & Security

RedR also continued to conduct trainings in the core skills need by humanitarians in Pakistan:

  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Basics of Humanitarian Principles
  • Proposal and Report Writing
  • Needs Assessment
  • WASH Essentials
  • Project Management (offered as a credit-rated professional qualification)
  • Logistics in Emergencies
Jun 12, 2013

Aid workers benefit from RedR's expertise

Adeel in earthquake drill photocredit Usman Ghani
Adeel in earthquake drill photocredit Usman Ghani

The world is waking up to the fact that addressing the risk of disasters before they happen is the only way forward.  RedR is doing this already through programmes such as its Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) work in Pakistan.

Bushra Azad is a teacher in Muzaffrabad. She recently received RedR training in School Safety, which she has used to show her pupils how to behave in the event of an earthquake, fire or flood.

‘Now I’ve been trained, I can see it’s really good for young children to know about safety and first aid.  These children can now educate their communities, and share with them the safety measures they’ve learnt.  Not all parents here are literate.  It is really important to teach these skills in schools. The skills will stay in the community, and help us all in the long-term.’

Simple knowledge makes all the difference in a crisis.  Bushra remembers two key examples, which she is certain will stick in the children’s minds:

‘I taught my class to stand in the corner in the case of an earthquake, because this is the strongest part of the room, structurally. Here in the city, children must stay away from all electricity cables in the street – many people were electrocuted in the earthquake when cables fell on them.’

RedR Trainers pass on these and other nuggets of life-saving information to teachers in Kashmir, who then lead training days and drills in schools.  Knowing when to adopt the brace position and how to seek cover under a desk or in an outside space means more children will survive. Schools which conduct regular evacuation drills and draw up safety plans, are immeasurably better prepared for natural disasters

Aid workers and community leaders who benefitted from RedR training are implementing changes to better prepare for disasters. Here is a taste of the changes already happening in the communities where we have worked:

Sixteen year old Momina attended RedR training and represents the children of her community in a search and rescue team. She and her team conduct monthly simulations to keep their skills fresh. In the training she learned how to:

  •          Evacuate in an earthquake;
  •          Work collaboratively in a search and rescue team to find and save survivors;
  •          Deliver first aid, including applying bandages properly and how to use household items if there is no first aid kit available
Feb 25, 2013

Training local aid workers and building local skills

Youth involved in community-preparedness
Youth involved in community-preparedness

“We were planning to launch a disaster risk reduction project but did not have anyone with the training”. 

Mussarat, local aid worker

Aid agencies did all they could to help the communities of the Sindh survive in the difficult aftermath of the floods in 2010, 2011 and 2012, but knew that teaching people to cope when floods struck in future would be the most valuable gift they could give.  However few of their staff were trained in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR).

In 2012 RedR delivered Disaster Risk Reduction courses to several Pakistani NGOs and local government departments. Mussarat and four of her colleagues from an NGO called Indus Resource Centre, based in Mirpur Khas district, Sindh province, are now able to work with whole villages to protect them against future floods. In practice this means that:

  • Hazards have been identified and addressed. These include low-lying electricity cables or large holes that could be filled with water during a flood (as well as being a direct hazard these attract mosquitoes)
  • Pre-emptive structural changes have been made. House flooring has been raised to a higher level, walls fortified using traditional tools people already own plans put in place to monitor canal water levels to ensure it remains an effective barrier against floods
  • Links have been built with local and district authorities, identifying government and media resources and key regional points of contact, such as district fire departments and irrigation departments. These will reduce the vulnerability of the village and make a coordinated future effort of relief and recovery possible

The organisations that RedR has trained in Mirpur Khas district cover the whole region, population 15,000. Musarrat's NGO alone covers 23 villages, meaning thousands of people are better prepared for future disasters.

Village women learn about local disaster hazards
Village women learn about local disaster hazards
Aid worker working with local people
Aid worker working with local people
Musarrat, local aid worker
Musarrat, local aid worker

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Organization

RedR

London, n/a, United Kingdom
http://www.redr.org.uk

Project Leader

Helen Varma

London, London United Kingdom

Where is this project located?

Map of Essential training for Pakistani aid workers