Educate 30 Children in Western Tanzania

 
$13,285
$6,715
Raised
Remaining
Our Students
Our Students

Dear Project Wezesha and Girls Ed Supporters,

I returned from a recent trip to Tanzania, during which I visited with most of our current scholarship students - including those who have recently graduated from secondary school with hopes of continued support for vocational school or college. Here's how our visit went:

On Saturday, July 13th Lucas, Maiko and I made our way into Mgaraganza Village with Saidi and Albert, two of our students who stay in town. Our destination – Amahoro Secondary School. Our purpose – meet with the current students in our program to visit, chat, and take pictures.

Between 11a – 12p, the students showed up alone, in pairs, in small groups. When all were present, we were a group of 21 students plus Lucas and Maiko. A few of our students were not able to join us because they attend schools outside of the region (Iringa, Dar es Salaam, Dodoma and Tabora).

Starting out our visit, there were many greetings and introductions among the students so they could get to know one another. It’s nice to see this scholarship program bringing new friends together from neighboring village around the shared desire to continue their education.

Once everyone was together, we sat around one of the unfinished, shaded and breezy classrooms of the new school. Lucas invited them to ask questions and share views. Of course, the students I’ve known the longest were initially the most chatty. They provided some insights into the situations that most affect students here in Tanzania. One student shared that life for students is hard and that after school, there is no time to study.  Her mother died a long time ago and now her father, who is elderly, is ailing. Hajira, therefore has a lot of work to do around the house to help her father and grandmother after school. This includes everything from tending to the animals, fetching water and firewood, and cooking.

Khadija, one of our long-time students who now attends VETA to study computers (having completed secondary school 2 years ago) noted that yes, life is hard and there is much work to do, but there is also the issue of students being lazy. She said there are plenty of times in the week when students are not working, times when they could be studying but they don’t. Of course, I know both cases to be true. Those who dig deep and find the motivation to study and strive for 'more' will hopefully reach their goals.

Fortunately, several of our students are driven and highly value the opportunity being afforded them. Khadija will be taking a ‘field’ assignment near Kasulu in the fall where she’ll work as a secretary in an office to put her new computer skills to use. Diana has enrolled herself in a college, similar to VETA to also study computer and secretarial skills. Ismael and Kiza are aiming for Nursing School. They both have scores high enough in the subjects necessary for admission to a Nursing program near Kasulu. Lucas and I told them that now their responsibility is to find out all the information Lucas needs for us to proceed – application due dates, cost of tuition, and other details. We talked to them about initiative and encouraged them not to wait for Lucas or me to make suggestions and connections for them.

The usual woes of the education system emerged: shortage of teachers, teachers who don’t come to class, lack of textbooks, cost of school fees (for those out of our program), size of the class, low English language proficiency for subjects taught in English only, lack of breakfast that leaves them starving by noon and unable to focus, etc. If the Government could just make two major changes, education and therefore life in Tanzania would be dramatically improved: 1) make secondary school free and 2) adopt dual language immersion (Kiswahili and English) earlier in primary school or implement it in secondary school. The abrupt transition from education in Swahili to education in English is brutal and causes most failures.

They also paired up and brainstormed some questions to ask me so that we could discuss other issues or so they could just pick my brain a bit. They asked me lots of questions – some requests for additional support, some requests for a field trip to Gombe or the Livingston Memorial, some personal Qs (Do you have children? Why not? Are you married? Why not? How old are you? – most guessed in the 20s, so that was nice).

We took many pictures, coaxing smiles so the true personalities that I have come to know really shine through. After a long afternoon together, everyone was hungry (especially our Muslim students who were fasting for Ramadan). We bid farewell and everyone headed off in different directions toward their home villages. It was so fulfilling to see these students that I've known for years - grown, happy, excited to continue studying and very grateful for the support they've received from you!

For more pictures of this visit and plenty of smile shots, visit our Facebook page and click on the album entitled: Catching up with Our Students 2013. We would love your continued support as we support these students through secondary school and onward into nursing programs, vocational schools or high school. Please consider making a contribution and/or sharing our work with your friends and family.

Thank you so much!

Zainabu and Rai
Zainabu and Rai

Links:

Amina
Amina

Dear Project Wezesha supporters,

We hope you are having a wonderful spring season! There are a few exciting updates to share about our scholarship program, so please keep reading.

First, you might recall that we added 22 students to our program last summer. Of those 22, nine of them were Standard 7 level students. Standard 7 is the last grade in primary school. The pressure on these students was great after being selected because in order to advance to secondary school, you must pass exit exams from primary school. Based on your scores, the government of Tanzania, via the Ministry of Education, determines which secondary school you will attend. So - our students studied hard and did their very best.

Now, we can congratulate the following students on passing these exams: Sango, Waridi, Ezra, Rahma, George, Amina, Mahamadu and Simoni. One student, Elinathani, did not pass but he has the option of repeating standard 7 and trying again next year. All of those who passed are currently attending secondary schools, as of January 2013! In fact, two of them scored so well that the Ministry of Education sent them to exceptional schools in larger cities within Tanzania. Waridi is attending a private school in Dar es Salaam and Ezra is attending a boarding school in Dodoma.

In other good news, our fiscal agent - Girls Education International - is branching out with a new scholarship program in Tanzania, in partnership with Project Wezesha! So, in addition to the boys and girls that you are helping us support through our own scholarship program, Girls Ed will be selecting an additional group of bright young girls to support starting January of 2014. The application and selection process will begin in July 2013. Project Wezesha will provide in-country management of this program.  It's a natural fit! Girls Ed will be supporting girls in Pakistan, Liberia and Tanzania. Project Wezesha is happy to support this effort to increase access to education for girls in Tanzania!

Also, this summer, Project Wezesha will have another intern - Brian Frederich, an undergraduate student at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, UT. We are very excited to see what great work Brian will do with the village leaders and the students in Tanzania. Plus, we'll have a wealth of reports, images and updates coming our way for the 2 months he is there - living in the village with Jane and Ashahadu.

Finally, Project Wezesha co-founder Rai Farrelly will be going back to Tanzania this summer for the month of July to check in, get reports from teachers about students' progress and continue to strengthen the important relationships we've developed over the years!

All the best and please, continue to follow us on Facebook and share updates with your friends. We need all the support we can get in order to make this educational initiative sustainable!

Cheers,

Rai Farrelly & Lucas Lameck

Waridi
Waridi

Links:

Happy Holidays
Happy Holidays

Greetings supporters of Project Wezesha,

We wanted to send a shout out for the holidays and let you know that not a day passes when we don't reflect on how fortunate we are to have your support! This past summer, we added twenty new students to our scholarship program and moved four of our graduates into vocational school so they could continue to study beyond their secondary education. If you didn't get a chance to read about them in our October update, here's another chance.

Also, we are excited about our 3rd annual Project Wezesha calendars. If you are still thinking about some 'good giving' ideas for the holidays, you might consider giving the gift of education to the children in and around Mgaraganza while also giving a lovely 2013 Project Wezesha calendar to a loved one.  You can learn more about ordering the calendars by clicking here.

All the best to you and your families!
Thank you for being part of our Project Wezesha family!

Cheers,
Rai Farrelly & Lucas Lameck

Links:

New Mgarganza Students
New Mgarganza Students

Dear Project Wezesha Supporters,

This summer was a productive summer for our scholarship program - we've grown!

First, we had the pleasure of hosting our first intern in Tanzania for Project Wezesha. Katy Lindquist of Colby College lived in the village of Mgaraganza with one of our beloved families. She had a room in the home of Jane and Ashahadu, our friends in Mgaraganza village.  She worked to improve our scholarship program by spearheading the implementation of a new application process that ensures that students who seek support are invested in their education and have the necessary support of their schools and families. You can read about Katy's experiences in her blog entry for Project Wezesha.

Now, Project Wezesha is happy to announce that we have added 19 new students for a total of 30 students actively supported by Project Wezesha - and you!

Among the 30 students, we have 11 students from our original group, some still continuing with secondary school and others, like Hindu and Khadija continuing post-graduation with VETA - the Vocational Educational Training Authority - where they are developing vocational skills. Among the 19 students we have added this year are boys and girls from 5 incorporated villages - including Bubango, Kagongo, Mtanga, Kigaliye and Mgaraganza. They range in grade level from Form 1 to Form 4. Their dreams are big; they want to be doctors, teachers, scientists. You can read more about each of our new students on our blog.

In addition to being added to the scholarship program, students were given headlamps donated by Black Diamond Equipment Ltd. These Wiz headlamps will give the students a greater opportunity for education by allowing them to study after dark - without inhaling kerosine smoke. You can read about their reactions to these headlamps here.

We know that none of this is possible without the support of our contributors. We want you to know the value of your involvement! Thank you very much for the tremendous impact you are having on these children's lives and the future of their communities. We at Girls Ed, Project Wezesha and on behalf of the children and families you support want to say 'Asante Sana!'.

With gratitude,

Rai Farrelly

Learning How to Use Headlamps
Learning How to Use Headlamps

Links:

Our students
Our students

Greetings friends and supporters of Project Wezesha,

Thank you so much for your generous support of our scholarship program to support students attending secondary school in Western Tanzania. We have some exciting updates to share about the program!

First, as we announced in March, four of our girls graduated last October. Now, Silvesia, Hindu, Edina and Khadija are starting classes at the Vocational Education and Training Authority (VETA). The girls are going to board on site, which is safer and ensures that they can remain focused on their educational and career goals. The decision to continue our support beyond secondary school was reached through discussions with the students about the 'reality' of secondary school in the villages. The percentage of students who graduate secondary school with scores high enough to earn them admission to high school is below 10%. We don't want the last day of secondary school to be the last day of formal education for our students, so we decided to continue supporting them, if they so desire, through additional professional training so that they can support their families in the future. So far, they have all been enthusiastic about continuing their education.

Another exciting announcement is that Project Wezesha has its first intern! The bright, motivated Katy Lindquist of Colby College in Maine traveled to Tanzania in May. She was greeted at the airport by Lucas and has settled in with our friends Jane and Ashahadu in the village of Mgaraganza. Katy and Lucas have already done amazing, important work to reshape our scholarship program. They have been working with the village leaders to create a Scholarship Committee charged with reviewing applications and selecting new recipients. In addition, a new application process is being put in place so that the students are invested in the process and have an increased sense of responsibility for their learning and their spot in the program. Previously, the selection was primarily need-based, but now we are asking the students to demonstrate their commitment.

We also want to highlight the recent contribution of first year medical students at the University of Texas at Austin. With the guidance of their mentor, Dr. Oakes, these students pulled together several fundraising efforts to raise $15,000 for Project Wezesha - most of which will fund the building of Amahoro Secondary School, but a large portion of which will help us grow our scholarship program and support the girls at VETA.

Speaking of growing our scholarship program, the new Scholarship Committee will be put to work this very summer as we add 13 new students to our roster! Five of these new students will be supported by the Amani Hope Scholarship Fund - a new partnership that we announced in March. We are delighted to be able to add so many new students this year!

Please be sure to check in on our Facebook page and read the blog on our website. I'll be traveling to Kigoma on July 11th to join Katy and Lucas to continue our work. The pictures, videos and notes from the field will be flowing as much as the spotty electricity in town allows!

With much love and gratitude,
Asante sana!

Rai Farrelly and Lucas Lameck
co-founders, Project Wezesha

Scholarship Recipient - Amosi
Scholarship Recipient - Amosi
Scholarship Recipient - France
Scholarship Recipient - France

Links:

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Organization

Project Leader

Raichle Farrelly

Co-Founder, Project Wezesha; Treasurer, Girls Education International
Lakewood, CO United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Educate 30 Children in Western Tanzania