Build Dormitories so 48 Students Can Go to School

 
$13,484
$11,886
Raised
Remaining
Nov 15, 2013

Thanks for your support!

Boys at Gaurishankar Hostel
Boys at Gaurishankar Hostel

Thanks to you, we shortened the path to education for 48 Nepali boys and girls in a remote, rural village of Nepal. NYF built two dormitories -- one for girls and another for boys of Gaurishankar Secondary School in Doti. The hostel, built near the high school that serves 30 villages, was limited to students who had to walk three to eight hours a day to and from school. Teachers live with the students during the week.

Life in the rugged western region of Nepal – some 500 miles from Kathmandu – is a constant struggle for survival. People lack adequate food, safe driving water, decent schools and primary health care. Travel is difficult. There are few roads and those that exist are in poor condition.

The dropout rate in Nepal is very high and even higher in rural areas. Students are not quitting because they do not want an education, but because of the long journeys, they are forced to take to get to class. Villages tend to be small – typically around 10 households in each. Since it is impossible to build a school in each village, they are constructed more or less at equal distance from the surrounding villages. As a result, some children walk as much as eight hours a day to get to and from school, trekking along dangerous trails, through dense forests and across thundering rivers. The problem is especially acute for girls, who also risk physical assault.

Local teachers, students and parents in various villages helped us to come up with a plan to build student housing – dormitories where students could stay during the week. We chose the Gaurishankar Secondary School because it serves a large population of students and is the only high school in the area that serves 30 villages.

Local villagers donated land for the project, provided volunteer labor and managed the construction work.

No more will these young people have to waste hours every day and risk their lives just to attend school. Thank you for this life-changing gift. Please look at some of our other projects on GlobalGiving and continue to support the work we do. Namaste.

Hostel at Gaurishankar School
Hostel at Gaurishankar School
Girls at Gaurishankar Hostel
Girls at Gaurishankar Hostel
Aug 19, 2013

Shortening the distance to education

New residents of the Gaurishankar Youth Hostel
New residents of the Gaurishankar Youth Hostel

Life in the rugged western region of Nepal – some 500 miles from Kathmandu – is a constant struggle for survival. People lack adequate food, safe driving water, decent schools and primary health care. Travel is difficult. There are few roads and those that exist are in poor condition.

The most striking problem I observed while visiting the area was the high number of students who drop out of school. They are not quitting because they do not want an education, but because of the long journeys they are forced to take to get to class. Villages tend to be small – typically around 10 households in each. Since it is impossible to build a school in each village, they are constructed more or less at equal distance from the surrounding villages. As a result, some children walk as much as eight hours a day to get to and from school, trekking along dangerous trails, through dense forests and across thundering rivers. The problem is especially acute for girls, who also risk physical assault.

We discussed the problem with local teachers, students and parents in various villages and came up with a plan to build student housing – dormitories where students could stay during the week. We chose a school that served a large population of students and selected the Gaurishankar Secondary School in Doti, which is the only high school in the area that serves 30 villages.

Local villagers donated land for the project, provided volunteer labor and managed the construction work. We built two hostels – one for girls and another for boys. The hostel was limited to students who had to walk three to eight hours a day to and from school. Teachers live with the students during the week.

During a recent visit, we were overwhelmed to see the joy and gratitude of the children – no more would they have to waste hours every day and risk their lives just to attend school. We hope this project will be the first of many that will ease the burden of students in this remote and impoverished part of Nepal.

Villagers welcome NYF to Gaurishankar School
Villagers welcome NYF to Gaurishankar School

Links:

May 29, 2013

Improving Access to Education

A Rural School
A Rural School

Education in Rural Nepal

In Nepal, there are numerous barriers to a child successfully completing secondary school.  Only 70% of children even start primary school. Many do not finish the 5th grade. Students must struggle with both financial and practical obstacles to finishing school.

Financially, many families can’t afford the school fee, which is modest by the standards of developed countries, let alone the cost of books and uniforms. The Nepal Youth Foundation has supported hundreds of students so they can receive an education. During the reporting period, NYF supported 43 rural students (29 male, 19 female) by providing them with scholarships.

NYF’s field workers regularly check on the children and observe how the schools are functioning. They walk the mountain paths of isolated rural areas, stopping at village schools to survey the situation and discuss any problems with the headmasters and students.

The Nepal Youth Foundation supports children until they can support themselves. After they graduate from high school, the organization provides them with college scholarships or vocational training. Nearly 300 children have received life-changing opportunities since this program started.

Many students face challenges just getting to the classroom. While life is difficult everywhere in Nepal, it is especially challenging in Western Nepal, a rugged and remote region. Many villages lack roads. Children must walk for hours on dirt paths to reach school. Some must walk for over 20 miles. Aside from the rough terrain and poor footpaths, some girls do not feel safe after dark and must actually run to reach home before sundown. These challenges contribute to the high dropout rate in Nepal.

To help students attend and complete secondary school, NYF is constructing two dormitories – one for girls and another for boys. Each will provide 24 students from distant villages a place to stay so they can focus on studying, not traveling to and from school. Teachers will also live at the dormitories to ensure the children’s safety.

Links:

Feb 7, 2013

Build Dormitories so Rural Kids Can Attend School

Rural Village Scholarships

Outcomes  •  2011 – 2012

Many Nepali children do not attend school because their families cannot afford the uniform and small fees. Furthermore, many parents expect their children to work on the family farm or do housework all day.

In 2011-2012, the Nepal Youth Foundation’s village scholarships provided education to 74 children in impoverished rural families – 33 girls and 41 boys. Many are the first members of their families to attend school.

NYF’s Solution

Only 70% of Nepali children enroll in primary school, and many of them drop out before the fifth grade. In the rural areas where the Nepal Youth Foundation works, the dropout rate is very high. Often, a family simply cannot afford the cost of the school uniform and school supplies, or even the very small school fee.

In several rural districts in Nepal, the Nepal Youth Foundation grants scholarships to children to cover their school expenses. This is the first generation in most of these areas to receive an education. An education is the best way to prepare these youngsters for the very difficult future that awaits them, since an increasing number of the next generation in Nepal's overpopulated hills will inherit no land and will have no choice but to find their fortunes competing for jobs in the cities.

The impact of the program ripples throughout communities. The scholarships motivate parents other than those whose children NYF supports to send their kids to school, because there is social pressure in the village when some kids go to school and others do not. Some parents hope that their children will also be sponsored if they start school. Headmasters report that there are noticeable rises in general attendance after NYF brings its scholarship program to their schools.

NYF’s field workers visit the schools regularly to check on the children and to observe how the schools are functioning. They walk the mountain paths of isolated rural areas, stopping at various village schools to survey the situation and discuss any problems with the headmasters and students.

The Nepal Youth Foundation supports children until they can support themselves. After they graduate from high school, the organization provides them with college scholarships or vocational training. 273 children have received life-changing opportunities thanks to this program since NYF began.

I Am Not Hopeless

I am now twelve years old. I have my father, mother and three brothers in my family and I am the only daughter. I am studying in grade 5. I feel so lucky because of the support I have been receiving from NYF. If I hadn't got support, going to school would have been a dream to me because my family is so poor.

Our condition is very miserable. The roof of our house is made of straw. During the rainy season the rain water leaks through the roof and the house is also vulnerable to the wind. My father has no job and we have a very small plot of land. The cultivation from that land is insufficient for us even to feed ourselves. We don't even have enough blankets to protect ourselves from the winter. My only clothes are the school uniform provided by NYF.

My aim in life is to become a nurse and take care of the poor. That is why I have been studying so hard. But my father scolds me when he gets drunk. He even beats my mother. Last time she had to be taken to hospital because of my father's physical torture. Despite these adversities, I am not hopeless.

Links:

Oct 22, 2012

Children walk for hours to get to school

Namu must limp 8 miles to school every day
Namu must limp 8 miles to school every day

Life in the rugged western region of Nepal-some 500 miles from Kathmandu- is a constant struggle for survival.  People lack adequate food,safe drinking water, decent schools and primary health care.  Travel is difficult.  There are few roads and those that exist are in poor condition.  

Gaurishankar School in rural western Nepal is a public school for 450 students from first through tenth grade. There is no road to the school. It can only be reached on foot, via steep, rough trails. Because it is the only high school that serves more than 30 villages, some students walk as far as 20 miles round-trip every schoolday, often across dangerous rivers. During the rainy season, students must cross dangerous rivers. Girls feel unsafe walking after dark.

The Nepal Youth Foundation has launched a new project to construct student housing at the school, so that fewer students drop out and so the students have enough time to study. This student housing will reduce the drop-out rate and give students more time to study so they can succeed.

The Nepal Youth Foundation is constructing dormitories, one for girls and one for boys. Schoolteachers will live in the housing and supervise the students. .

 Namu, a victim of polio, is determined to go to school

Thirteen-year-old Namu is a victim of polio and walks with a marked limp. She is from a village four miles away from Gaurishankar School. Namu is determined to attend the school even though she has to walk eight miles a day, which takes her four hours. Namu would like to stay near the school and have more time to study, but there are no dormitories or houses nearby where she can rent a room.

Links:

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Funded

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.

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Organization

Project Leader

Jackie Frost

Sausalito, California United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Build Dormitories so 48 Students Can Go to School