1000 doctors free 3rd world from charity reliance

 
$18,704
$11,296
Raised
Remaining
Jan 26, 2011

More information on chronic diseases in Vietnam

From the four continents that it deploys to, Vietnam in Asia Pacific represents a unique and dynamic challenge for Global Medic Force, as the rapid economic growth in the country has transformed the national epidemiology from one of infectious diseases to chronic diseases.

What this means in practical terms is that 72% of people in Vietnam are now dying of conditions that are entirely treatable.

 As the people of Vietnam are increasingly exposed to the hazards of a “western lifestyle”  we see a daily increase nationally in conditions such a Diabetes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Hypertension, Cardiovascular disease, Cancer, etc. slicing through the entire population.

 Examples include:

  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD):  Vietnam is the country with the highest rate of COPD in Asia-Pacific.  COPD kills on average one person every 10 seconds in the world.  US$ 77.5 million is spent annually in Vietnam to treat late stage COPD in hospitals (excluding out-patient visits).
  • Diabetes Type 2: Vietnam has the highest growth rate of Diabetes Type 2 globally. 18 Million Vietnamese are currently at high risk for the disease.  65% of patients do not know that they have the disease. 
  • Only 85 doctors in Vietnam know how to manage a patient with Diabetes.
  • Cardiovascular Diseases (i.e. hypertension, heart disease): 10% of all Vietnamese have been diagnosed with hypertension while 77% of people with hypertension do not know that they have it.
  • Liver cirrhosis affects 15 times more Vietnamese than all Europeans combined.
  • 5.2 % of all Vietnamese are overweight or obese due to the increase of “Western style” lifestyles.
  • Malnutrition:  60 million people in Vietnam have parasitic worm infections.
  • Cancer: 200,000 Vietnamese contract cancer each year.  Annual mortality rates are 50%.
  • Hepatitis B and C infection rates are 10 times higher in Vietnam than in comparable middle income and developed countries, and sharply rising

 As 1 million Vietnamese every year are now moving to Sai Gon and Ha Noi, the national health services are overwhelmed, and increasingly look to Global Medic Force with its 1,700 medical volunteers to step into the breach and meet the challenges of the new diseases which threaten to ravage this beautiful land and its wonderful people.

 What people are saying about Global Medic Force’s work:

 “I cannot tell you how many Vietnamese lives Global Medic Force volunteers have saved.”

Peter Vu Ngoc Son, MD, MPHM - Program Officer, Care and Treatment Family Health International (FHI), Vietnam.

 

 “Global Medic Force has captured the gold ring in global health helping to create high-quality, low-cost, sustainable services. It is the stuff of which Nobel prizes are made.” 

Ambassador Dr. Mark Dybul MD - Founder & Head PEPFAR Fund.

 

“Global Medic Force has reshaped the way we should all be thinking about healthcare. A brilliant model that leaves a lasting footprint wherever it has stepped: an immediate impact wherever it lands, leaving top quality medical care for generations to come.” 

Guy Hart Global Head Structured Credit BNP Paribas.

 

“It has been the most incredible experience of my life. The contribution of Global Medic Force volunteers here is greatly needed.  Our knowledge and experience is invaluable and much appreciated.” 

Dr. Vincent Jarvis, MD, Clinical Mentor, Vietnam.

 

“I recently went back to visit Thu Duc, the clinic I mentored.  They now have 350 patients. My return visit really has confirmed the success and the value of the mentoring.” 

Dr. Nicholas Medland, MD, Clinical Mentor, Vietnam.

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Project Leader

Katie Graves-Abe

Director of Operations
New York, NY United States

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