Conserving the Ridgway's Hawk in Punta Cana, DR

 
$73,337
$21,663
Raised
Remaining
Jun 9, 2014

May 31, 2014 Report

2014 has been the most exciting and successful year yet for the Ridgway’s Hawk Conservation Project here in the Dominican Republic. In Punta Cana in 2013, we witnessed the formation of the first breeding pair of our released birds (2012 released female Red ND and 2011 released male Black AV). They successfully produced the first wild chick (male Blue 44) outside of the last stronghold of Ridgway’s Hawks in Los Haitises National Park. Early in 2014 we confirmed the second breeding pair which formed from two previously released individuals: 2009 released female Red SN and 2012 released male Black AN. Both pairs went on to build nests and incubate eggs. AV and ND were successful again and fledged two young male hawks on May 17th. These birds are doing great and now that they are old enough to be left on their own, both parents are leaving the nest site in search of food to feed the youngsters until they have learned to hunt for themselves. Unfortunately, SN and AN were not successful as both of their eggs turned out to be infertile. They continue to remain together in their territory and we have high hopes that they will try again next year.

Due to last year’s successful nesting from AV and ND, The Peregrine Fund made plans to beef up release efforts, moving the project out of the experimental phase and begin releasing enough individuals to create a second population in Punta Cana. The new plan for 2014 was to release 25 new hawks in Punta Cana, more hawks than have been released in all years of the project combined (19 total in the Punta Cana area). This increase was only possible due to the grueling work of treating all the wild chicks in Los Haitises to prevent botfly infestations. Efforts to increase survivability of nestlings have more than doubled the numbers of chicks which survive to fledging age in the national park population. Thus we can leave a substantial number of chicks to fledge naturally in Los Haitises   and have more birds to release as part of the effort to expand the distribution of this critically endangered bird. The final total of released birds in 2014 was 29 individuals with the final release taking place on June 1st.

Another first in 2014 was that we raised many of the chicks we released from about 5-7 days old until they were of age to be moved to the release site, about 35 days old. The hope was that this would enable the wild adults who produced these chicks in Los Haitises National Park to renest. This method seemed to work well as all of the pairs from which we took young nestlings eventually made a second attempt at nesting and many of the birds are currently raising their second round of nestlings.

Education is one of the most important aspects of any good conservation program. Here in Punta Cana it is essential that we make efforts to educate the surrounding communities about the work we are doing and the importance of the hawk. One of the best ways to help people to appreciate an animal is to make it something that they associate with having fun or something in which they can take pride. To this end, in 2014, we launched the very first Ridgway’s Hawk Day right here in Punta Cana, inviting school children from a nearby barrio to the Punta Cana Ecological Foundation to see and learn about Ridgway’s Hawks. The date we chose, May 25th, is the day B-44 hatched last year (B-44 is the first wild chick hatched in Punta Cana and the first known chick hatched outside of the National Park population in more than 30 years). Many other educational activities were carried out including visits to local schools and visits to isolated communities in the area. As the population of Ridgway’s Hawks grows in Punta Cana, it will be essential to continue to grow our education efforts because the people who come into daily contact with these birds will potentially have a huge impact on their survivability as a species. Of course, in order to reach the Dominican communities here we need continued backing from our own community of support. Thank you so much for your interest in this project!

 

 

Mar 10, 2014

February 28, 2014 Report

View of the new hackbox at our site
View of the new hackbox at our site

2014 is upon us and with it a new breeding season for the Ridgway’s Hawk. Many pairs of Ridgway’s Hawks in Los Haitises National Park are already incubating and here at the Puntacana Ecological Foundation we are anticipating that our Ridgway’s Hawks in Punta Cana will soon be incubating as well. The pair of Ridgway’s Hawks, AV and ND, who raised a chick here last year have been observed taking fine materials to their nest (a sign that it is near completion). They have also been observed copulating and we are excited to see what the coming nesting season will bring for them.

B-44 (short-hand for right leg banded Blue 4 over 4), the offspring hatched last year by AV and ND, is a beautiful juvenile this year. He has been wandering the area as most young hawks do when they are surveying the available land before establishing a territory. B-44 has been spending time with another single male in the area, AR (released in 2011); they have been observed flying together on their way to separate roosts in the evening.

We recently discovered that AN, a young adult male Ridgway’s Hawk released in 2012, has moved his territory and paired up with SN, a female released in 2009. This is the first time we know of that SN has had the opportunity to be with a male. She and AN have been taking nesting materials to a palmchat nest in a royal palm that is located in the front yard of a large house here in Punta Cana. This is a great example of how easily these hawks can live in green urban and suburban areas when they are not persecuted by people. These hawks feed on rats, mice, snakes, lizards, skinks, birds, frogs, insects, and bats so they are able to support themselves readily both in wilderness and urban habitat. AN and SN have also been copulating and nest building so we are eagerly awaiting the results of their breeding efforts this season as well.

Aside from monitoring the Ridgway’s Hawks that are already in Punta Cana, we are looking forward to a great release season this year. We have been preparing a new release site in Punta Cana to help meet our goal of releasing 15 to 25 hawks this season. Last year we did not release any new hawks in Punta Cana because we wanted to put more effort into environmental education within the surrounding communities and also allow time for the electric poles in the area to be retro-fitted with t-perches to make them safer for perching hawks and other birds. In 2014, our educational outreach program will include efforts by a new project partner, Fundacion Propagas, who will be heading up a national education campaign to raise awareness about the Ridgway’s Hawk and the amazing conservation work being done with this species.

Last year The Peregrine Fund focused efforts on the main population of Ridgway’s Hawks in Los Haitises National Park. They monitored nesting pairs of adults as they have for many years and with the help of the Santo Domingo Zoo (ZOODOM) they came up with an effective treatment for the prevention of bot-fly infestations in nestling hawks. In the past, bot-flies have been associated with high mortality in nestling Ridgway’s Hawks. This treatment of nestlings has been credited with an increase in survival of nestling hawks to fledging age from 50%-60% in previous years to about 83% in 2013. This is great news for the Ridgway’s Hawk since it will make more nestlings available to release in order to create a second self-sustaining population here in Punta Cana.

During the 2009 to 2012 hacking seasons the project released about five birds per year as a sort of pilot program to help work out any complications involved in the hacking of Ridgway’s Hawks. Now that there are two breeding pairs from the released birds in the Punta Cana area and we have had a chance to address the highest causes of mortality, it is time to begin releasing larger groups of birds. The Peregrine Fund is investing heavily in the conservation of the core population in Los Haitises National Park and as a result, more nestling Ridgway’s Hawks are available for release. It is vital to the conservation of the species that a second, self-sustaining population be created and now with two nesting pairs in Punta Cana, we are on our way to doing just that here on the eastern end of Hispaniola. With so many positive things happening for the Ridgway’s Hawk we are very excited to see what the coming year will bring!

Please, if you are in the position to help, won’t you join us in our quest to conserve this unique and very rare animal?

This report was written for the Puntacana Ecological Foundation by Thomas Hayes and Christine Deegear Hayes, Ridgway’s Hawk Project Biologists, The Peregrine Fund.

Students from Cornell University observing hawks
Students from Cornell University observing hawks
Environmental Education in a School close to PC
Environmental Education in a School close to PC
B-44 the first Ridgways hawk to hatch in Puntacana
B-44 the first Ridgways hawk to hatch in Puntacana
Dec 4, 2013

December 2013 Report

Publicity by Dominican Newspaper HOY
Publicity by Dominican Newspaper HOY

Since the last report the first natural born Ridgway’s Hawk in Punta Cana, B44, has become totally independent and is now living around the residential area of Tortuga Bay within the Puntacana Resort & Club property. When the last report was posted the parents of B44 were still hunting for him but slowly he began hunting on his own and expanding his territory until recently when he stopped returning to his parents’ territory for meals. Over the next year he will most likely continue to explore  until he settles on an area that suits him best. B44’s birth helped spur a flurry of local media attention to the plight of the Ridgway’s Hawk and other critically endangered birds in the Dominican Republic. Accompanying this report are photos of two articles that appeared in some of the more widely circulated newspapers in the Dominican Republic: Hoy and El Nacional.

As for the parents (AV & ND), they are still together and living in and around the area where they nested several months ago. Typically Ridgway’s Hawks form a pair for life and will mate/lay eggs every year. Our hope is that AV & ND will mate again in early 2014 only this time ND hopefully will lay two or more eggs!

In other news, AN, one of the males without a mate has moved into SN’s (a female’s) territory around the Puntacana Village. SN has yet to mate with any of the other hawks in the area and we are hoping these two might form the next pair. To back this assertion up, one of the conservationists recently observed SN & AN flying in circles together, a typical behavior with hawks that are courting.

Finally, as we reach the end of 2013 we are looking to expand and build off of this year’s successes in 2014. The Peregrine Fund hopes to reintroduce as many as 20 hawks to Punta Cana and along with our project partners at Fundacion Propa-Gas, launch an even more expansive awareness campaign. To prepare for this initiative Fundacion Propa-Gas, The Peregrine Fund, and the Puntacana Ecological Foundation recently recreated the educational brochure based off of feedback from this year’s initiatives (see the accompanying photos) we are also exploring publishing other potential materials such as children’s books and t-shirts to help raise awareness about our efforts to protect this amazing bird. In order to dramatically increase the number of hawks to be reintroduced to the area we are preparing to construct new hack boxes and observational decks to handle the increased number of birds. If you have a chance to visit Punta Cana in 2014 we recommend you come and visit the Puntacana Ecological Foundation as this should be quite a site to see!

B44 (the first natural born chick in PC) resting
B44 (the first natural born chick in PC) resting
Outside of the new educational brochure
Outside of the new educational brochure
Inside of the new educational brochure
Inside of the new educational brochure

Attachments:
Sep 9, 2013

It's a male!

It
It's a male!

On the morning of July 2nd, 2013, staff from The Peregrine Fund acompanied by Dominican biologists climed into the first Ridgway's Hawk nest in Puntacana history. They brought the recently hatched chick safely down to the ground where it was examined, weighed, and fitted with a transmitter and identification band. The chick was identified as a male and found to be in perfect health, weighing in at 320g (about the average weight of a male his age). A blue identification band, with alphanumeric code 44, was placed on his right leg. The placement on his right leg indicates he is a male and the color blue signifies that he was born naturally in the area and not released like the other birds before him in Punta Cana. Shortly after his examination, this young hawk, now known as B44, was carefully placed back in the nest. He immediately started hopping up and down throughout his nest, playing with twigs and becoming more and more rambunctious.

On the afternoon of July 10th, another milestone was reached: B44 took his first flight! As if he had been doing it his whole life he flew from his nest to a coconut palm just across the street. From this day on he became more and more curious about his surroundings and eventually began flying beyond the immediate supervision of his parents. As the days passed B44 began developing predictable flying habits, making it easy for conservations from The Peregrine Fund to locate him - often just by listening for his calls around the nest area. More recently the chick began flying down to the ground to pick up twigs or leaves, which he would then either drop there on the ground or fly off with them only to let go of them later. The chick has also begun to display other interesting habits in which he sits perfectly still on a branch and then all of a sudden snaps into action by flying off and sinking his talons into a nearby palm tree before flying off again. This behavior indicates that he is beginning to fine tune his hunting skills.

Since the last report posted on Global Giving, biologists also managed to capture three of the adult hawks and replace their transmitters. This typically needs to be done once a year and is quite difficult to accomplish. Two hawks managed to evade our trapping methods, one of whose transmitter continues to give off a weak signal. Ultimately it was decided to leave these individuals be until they pair up with another hawk, at which time they will be much easier to capture in order to replace their transmitters. This was the case with the parents of B44 (ND & AV) neither of which had a working transmitter upon being captured at the nest site.

In other news, The Peregrine Fund continued its extensive education campaign by reaching out to new rural communities in the area as well as local businesses that had not previously been contacted. This latest round of educational presentations reached an additional 307 individuals, teaching them about the importance of this magnificent species and our conservation efforts in Punta Cana. In total, The Peregrine Fund has reached out to over 856 individuals this year, by far the most successful educational campaign in the history of this project.

attaching a new transmitter
attaching a new transmitter
The parents - ND & AV
The parents - ND & AV
The chick: B44
The chick: B44
It
It's a male!
attaching a new transmitter
attaching a new transmitter
The parents - ND & AV
The parents - ND & AV
The chick: B44
The chick: B44
May 31, 2013

The first chick is born!

ND (the female) in the nest
ND (the female) in the nest

 

This month the Ridgway’s Hawk project has exciting news to announce:  We have a Ridgway’s Hawk nest right here in Punta Cana WITH A CHICK!  ND, the female that had paired up with the male AN, laid a single egg in April that has just hatched this past week! 

In a surprising plot twist that sounds like something straight out of a telenovela, ND is no longer with the male AN but has left him for AV, an older male.  AV is a bird that was released in the 2011 hack season; AV did very well after his 2011 release and rapidly became independent, but one day that summer we found his transmitter, which appeared to have been cut off of his body, laying on the ground by the side of a road outside of Punta Cana!  Because one of the major challenges we face with the Ridgway’s hawk is persecution from people, we thought that someone must have killed AV, removing his transmitter and taking the body; we wrote him off as dead.  Thus when ND appeared one morning with this older male in tow, we were surprised and overjoyed to discover AV alive and in beautiful adult plumage!

AV and ND have since been very busy staking out their territory, constructing their nest on top of an active palmchat-colony nest in a cana palm, and laying eggs.  After over a month of incubation, the nestling finally hatched this past Saturday, May 25, 2013.  For the following several days we have been watching AV bringing prey to the nest and ND carefully tearing tiny bites to feed to the nestling.  On Tuesday we saw the top of the chick’s head for a few brief seconds over the edge of the nest as it was being fed.  Then on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 we climbed the nest palm to check that all was going well with the nestling.  We are happy to report that the chick was in perfect health and was safely examined and weighed, then replaced in the nest.  We will be closely monitoring the chick to ensure its health and safety as much as possible until it too is a flying member of the Punta Cana population of the Ridgway’s Hawk.

In other news, we have been focusing much of our attention on community education here in Punta Cana and in the surrounding communities.  Many workers at the resorts and persons whose livelihoods depend on the tourism industry have come to know the Ridgway’s Hawk (Gavilán de la Hispaniola) by name. Thus far in 2013 the Ridgway’s Conservation Initiative has reached out to over 292 adults and 257 youths in various communities, schools and businesses that may come in contact with the hawks.  We are continuing our efforts to nurture a feeling of ownership for the birds within the area with plans to spread out further in the future. 

Meanwhile, The Peregrine Fund’s conservation efforts for the Ridgway’s Hawk population located in Los Haitises National Park, is also making record-breaking progress this year.  So far The Peregrine Fund has banded 47 nestlings and 19 adults from over 50 nests that were closely monitored during the 2013 breeding season. This year a higher percentage of young birds have fledged than in years past, in part due to increased monitoring of nests.  While this does not directly affect the population here in Punta Cana, it is good news for the species and we applaud
the efforts of The Peregrine Fund and their field crew

Finally, many thanks to all the wonderful donors who have helped to keep this project afloat, we could not have made this sort of progress without your generous and continuing support!

This update was written for the Punta Cana Ecological Foundation by Christine Deegear Hayes, Seasonal Field Biologist,  The Peregrine Fund.

The new born chick!
The new born chick!
AV (the male) perched near the nest
AV (the male) perched near the nest

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Organization

Puntacana Ecological Foundation

Santo Domingo, n/a, Dominican Republic
http://www.puntacana.org

Project Leader

Jacob Kheel

Environmental Director
Santo Domingo, N/A Dominican Republic

Where is this project located?

Map of Conserving the Ridgway's Hawk in Punta Cana, DR