Remove landmines from a village in Cambodia

 
$15,521 $9,479
Raised Remaining
Leas Nok (HALO deminer) and her father
Leas Nok (HALO deminer) and her father

Dear HALO Supporters, 

20 year old Leas Nok was recently recruited and trained as a HALO deminer in Cambodia. Her mother died when she was young, while her father lost his leg to a landmine during the conflict of the early 1990s. Leas Nok is the oldest child in her family and is also the sole breadwinner. Such is her father’s joy in his daughter having secured employment with HALO that every day he brings his daughter’s lunch out to the minefield where she is working. 

This is exactly the brighter future your donations help make possible.  Thank you for being a part of the change.  

All your donations are tax-deductable. 96.2% of HALO’s global income goes directly to field operations. 

Many thanks. 

Children pick mushrooms on a former minefield.
Children pick mushrooms on a former minefield.

Thank you for your past support to clear landmines in Cambodia.  Since 1994, together with our donors, HALO has removed over 256,500 landmines in Cambodia so communities could return home, plant their crops and raise their families in safety.  2012 is turning out to be one of HALO's most productive years in Cambodia.  We've already cleared more ground and completed more mineclearance than ever before.  The most common use for HALO cleared land is for farmland (60%) and roads (29%) as exemplified by the chart below which shows the beneficiary use of the 2,200 acres that HALO demined last year.  Thank you for being a part of this great change.

Yet, there is still work to be done and the villagers in Banteay Ti Muoy that need our help.  This holiday season you can give the gift of peace.  Make a donation in honor of someone special and GlobalGiving will send the gift recipient a holiday card, email or print-at-home file.  Not only will you be investing in a Cambodia free from mines, you are also crossing names off your holiday shopping list!  Look for the 'Gift or In-Honor Of' tab below the orange donate button on the project site. 

Also, during the month of December GlobalGiving will be matching 100% on all recurring donations up to $100 per donor. They have $25,000 in matching funds available and matching will last until December 31st or until funds run out. If you want to give the gift of peace year-round December is a great time to start.  

Very many thanks and Happy Holidays. 

Post Mineclearance Land Use in Cambodia
Post Mineclearance Land Use in Cambodia

Links:

Van Thoeun - husband, father and grandfather.
Van Thoeun - husband, father and grandfather.

Van Thoeun (50 years old) is a husband, a father of six and a grandfather who risks his life to feed his family.  His family lives in Banteay Ti Mouy, the village this project supports, where there are landmines.  Despite the threat of mines on their land, Van cultivated the hazardous area because he had no other means to support his family.  He grows cassava, a staple crop in Cambodia and a major source of carbohydrates in the developing world.  Once harvested, chopped up and dried in the open air, a 1kg sack should earn him roughly 15c at the market.  His family depends on the food for nutrients and the surplus cash for living expenses. Thanks to our generous donors, like you, HALO was able to start clearing the hazardous land this August.  Van is thankful he will soon be able to farm without fear and stop worrying when his granddaughter runs into the fields to play.  

What if you had to choose between risking your life and feeding your family?  It’s a choice too many Cambodians have to face. 

Thank you for supporting this urgent work.    


Map of the area requiring mineclearance
Map of the area requiring mineclearance

Links:

Tour Minefields in Cambodia
Tour Minefields in Cambodia

The HALO Trust, Google Earth Outreach and Angelina Jolie Team up to Map Minefields around the World

HALO is leveraging Google Earth technology to bring added transparency to humanitarian landmine clearance. Tours of mine-affected areas were created for viewing in Google Earth software and narrated by Angelina Jolie, a longtime HALO supporter, taking viewers to mine-affected areas in Cambodia and Angola.  Explore a Minefield shows how mineclearance has allowed families to return home, land to be used for agriculture, roads to  be re-opened, and children to walk to school safely – in short, communities to thrive.  It also shows viewers minefields that remain in villages which still require clearance. Watch the tours here - http://www.googletour.halousa.org/

HALO uses Google Earth to help clear landmines. Thanks to a grant from Google Earth Outreach, HALO uses Google Earth Pro in thirteen countries for minefield survey, data validation and to produce maps for donors, governments, and other NGOs.  Google Earth’s historical imagery allows HALO to provide time-lapse images that clearly show how landmine removal is helping war-torn communities rebuild.  Explore a Minefield was funded through a Google Earth Outreach Developer Grant. 

Angelina Jolie first learned about the landmine issue and the work of The HALO Trust while filming Tomb Raider in Cambodia.  She has since been an advocate of HALO’s work, visiting and supporting mine removal efforts in a number of war-torn countries including Cambodia, Sri Lanka, and Kosovo. 

We hope you enjoy the tours!  If you do please share them with your friends and family.

Yours in demining,

Angelina Jolie is a longtime HALO supporter
Angelina Jolie is a longtime HALO supporter

Links:

exposing a live landmine to be destroyed
exposing a live landmine to be destroyed

On March 20, 2012 , Alexis Nadin and Jacqueline Lee from GlobalGiving joined HALO Trust in Siem Reap, Cambodia for a day in the field - clearing landmines. 

Looking at a giant map HALO representative, Stanislav, demonstrated the areas identified as minefields, those cleared by HALO, and those cleared by other organizations. A majority of the colors are focused around the Thailand border, and many of the current minefields yet to be cleared are around villages where families and children are at risk of accidentally coming across not only a landmine but also a tank mine or even a UXO, unexploded ordinance – remnants of past war and conflict.

Stanislav shared the Baseline Survey Project, which is uniting every organization in the area clearing minefields to identify all minefields and has a goal of capturing 95% of the fields needing to be cleared.

Who informs organizations of the fields? Local villagers, former soldiers, and others who have heard stories, witnessed explosions, or themselves have lost legs and family members in unidentified minefields around the towns. 

The danger is that as time goes by and the cost of living increases, villagers need to expand their fields for crops generating income. Additionally, as families grow and Cambodians repatriate to the country they need land to build homes, schools, and hospitals. As expansion and development increases in Cambodia, so does the risk of expanding into a forgotten minefield… that is until it is no longer forgotten and creating tragedy in the present.

What is stopping organizations like HALO from clearing every minefield? Stanislav explained to me that limited funding and capacity limits the number of minefields they can clear each year, therefore they have to focus on priority areas. Priority areas are high risk pieces of land next to villages with families and children as well as areas planned for development. Additionally, they target where the most accidents are happening – basically where there will be most impact.

These minefields are stopping progress of development and income generating activities for these families. In the field, I witnessed first hand the impact of the minefields. Crop fields and villages stop abruptly and as far as you can see are patches of dense untouched forest – these untouched areas are where accidents have and are occurring.

After an in depth and strict security and safety briefing by HALO, Alexis and I put on our safety gear which consisted of a helmet with plastic head and neck guard and a heavy, thick Kevlar vest protecting all vitals from an accidental detonation. We were showed a head guard and vest that had been exposed to a detonation, and although it was ripped-apart and dented on the outside, the inside was untouched like new. I felt confident in the safety of my vitals.

Going into the field was scary and exciting all at the same time. Beyond the safety zone were red sticks everywhere. These indicate un-cleared minefields – do not cross zones. As we went through the field accompanying the staff on their routine day, de-miners were working carefully and focused on discovered mines, potential mines not yet exposed, and scanning grids with high-tech metal detectors.

The de-miners had just discovered a few mines and carefully exposed the sides in order to verify and destroy them. Alexis and I were asked if we would like to destroy one of the mines – so we had the opportunity of a lifetime to press the button that would prevent a future tragedy.  It was an intense 30 seconds waiting for the explosion… then BOOM, a loud jolt went off that shook even my camera while I was filming. This was a small mine – I could not imagine how it must be if accidentally detonating or even standing next to it when it accidentally goes off or even when coming across a larger tank mine.

An important lesson of the day was stated by Stanislav from HALO Trust, “Mines don’t discriminate. We don’t discriminate.” HALO is empowering communities by providing jobs and opportunity for local Cambodians.  HALO hires locally to be a part of clearing local land, managing the projects, and supporting the local villages.

When clearing minefields, each landmine is a potential accident or death waiting to be exposed regardless of who or what comes across it. The sticks in the ground determining cleared mines were what I call “life sticks”, signifiers of what could have been tombstones but are now representing the lives that have been spared. 

Walking along the minefields
Walking along the minefields

Links:

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Organization

The HALO Trust

Washington, DC, United States
http://www.halousa.org/

Project Leader

Amy Currin

Program Officer
San Francisco, CA United States

Where is this project located?