Providing Flood Relief for Families in Philippines

 
$1,650
$6,350
Raised
Remaining
Feb 19, 2013

Circle of Virtue in Philippine Flood Relief

child displaced by flood waters with AAI food
child displaced by flood waters with AAI food

The United Nations has stated that in 2012 the Philippines had more severe damage from massive storms and ongoing floods from any country in the world.  As we close this project [GlobalGiving Project 10889] in capitol Manila and surrounding communities, our full focus is now concentrated on the ongoing relief for thousands of families still displaced by the December 2012  monster typhoon Bopha [see Asia America Project 12696].  Thanks to our GlobalGiving donors, who mostly provided heartfelt donations of between $10 and $50, the AAI flood relief teams of volunteers of college students and young professionals were able to rally concerted relief missions with emergency relief teams from the Philippine military, local government officials and private humanitarian NGOs to distribute protective clothing, medicines, blankets, water purification tabs, hygiene antiseptics -- and also rubber boots for more than 1,000 children living in polluted ankle-deep flood waters.  These timely to create real campaigns for epidemic prevention.

We translated $1,600 of funds through GlobalGiving into close to $15,000 cash contributions from larger Foundations and more than $1.5 million worth of relief supplies, clean water, emergency meals and public health supplies.  Under this program, between September and early December 2012, we served some 10,000 families or more than 50,000 persons.  

Communities sustained by AAI and our donor partners include Quezon City, Taquig, Marakina and Laguna.  Water from overflowing dams and river beds in many areas remains ankle deep.  This enhances the possibilities for epidemics of waterborne tropical diseases such as dengue fever and leptospirtosis [midevil plague caused by rats breeding in garbage and stagnant water].  We are a modest size organization and very engaged in a variety programs such as  Cancer and Rare Diseases Treatment for impoverished mothers and children and multi-disciplinary education and livelihood programs in support of the Peace Process between Christians and Muslims.  In our humanitarian programs, AAI continues to care for children who are  "out of sight, out of mind" due to lack of media coverage.  In these communities, ongoing  efforts include revitalizing public schools, urban and rural Gardens of Peace, donations of nutritional supplies, efforts to acquire clean water filtering systems and providing life-saving fever reducing and rehydration medicines.  

We thank GlobalGiving and all of our generous donors for your  kindness and care.  The process has become a very real "circle of virtue" of courageous people who live on at least four continents and who speak many languages.  Yet are united by our common human hearts.  Our efforts continue!

AAI and Filipino soldiers partner in hard hit town
AAI and Filipino soldiers partner in hard hit town
Peace is built on assisting  the poorest people
Peace is built on assisting the poorest people
cute boots prevent epidemic diseases
cute boots prevent epidemic diseases
Thousands of flood children were assisted by AAI
Thousands of flood children were assisted by AAI
Oct 17, 2012

Assisting Philippine Flood-Plagued Communities

As of October 15, 2012 the typhoon floods of August 2012 in Manila, Philippines and surrounding communities continued to be a source of misery and suffering for thousands of families.  With assistance from GlobalGiving's disaster relief fund for the Philippines, Asia America Initiative has continued to partner with emergency relief teams from the Philippine military and collegial NGOs to provide protective clothing, medicines and blankets for epidemic prevention.

Communities sustained by AAI and our donor partners include Quezon City, Taquig, Marakina and Laguna.  Water from overflowing dams and river beds in many areas remains ankle deep.  This enhances the possibilities for epidemics of waterborne tropical diseases such as dengue fever and leptospirtosis [mideivil plague caused by rats breeding in garbage and stagnant water].  AAI continues to care for children who are  "out of sight, out of mind" due to lack of media coverage.  Current efforts include feeding programs of rice porridge, donations of vitamins, efforts to acquire clean water filtering systems and fever reducing medicines.  We are seeking assistance though many modest donations to continua our flood relief programs into the Christmas Season.  We thank Global Giving and all of our generous donors for their kindness and care.  

Sep 24, 2012

Epidemic Prevention in Philippines Flood Areas

                                                                           Al Santoli

In early August 2012, the Philippines was devastated by the unanticipated ferocity of monsoon rains. Flood damage displaced more than 1.5 million people in the capitol region and other areas of the northern islands.   Massive destruction created by overflowing rivers and dams swept away many homes and entire communities of makeshift shanties.  Numerous municipalities and towns in the capitol region were affected, particularly areas such as Markina, Quezon City, Bulacan, Cavite and rural areas such as Baggio and Pagasinan.  The extent of the calamity overwhelmed the Red Cross and government agencies. 

With donor support from Global Giving in Washington, Asia America Initiative [AAI] staff members partnered with mobile relief teams from the Philippine Armed Forces 7th Civil Relations unit and volunteers from local non-governmental agencies to bring food and other humanitarian necessities into some of the hardest to reach and underserved communities in the city and countryside. These areas have both Christian and Muslim populations.  They are being especially threatened now with epidemics of lethal viral diseases such as leptospirosis, cholera and dengue fever..  To address these needs, AAI is proving clean water tablets, antibiotics, blankets and rubber boots for children to prevent their contact with disease-infected water and mud.  

The number of people served  by the AAI coordinated program in Manila and Mindanao is close to 10,000. Flood victims of all ages received help by the collaborative private-public sector effort covering at least five crowded communities.  Bags of staple foods for families of five to six people were enough for at least 5 days of sustenance.  In addition, AAI shared resources to purchase food with NGO partners working in the war-torn area of Mindanao where 60,000 people – including at least 30,000 babies and children -- are currently being sheltered and lack the basic necessities. 

The displaced population includes many widows and female heads of household.  Among them:

Mrs. Erlinda Paguinto, 37 years old, mother of three small children, lives in Tumana village, Marikina City. Their community is one of the most damaged by flood water and the inside of her house is covered with mud.  She is currently working as a factory laborer. Her small pay of less than $5US per day is their only source of sustenance which makes it hard for her to provide for their everyday needs. Their house is small but they treasure it as the place where they build their dreams and memories together as a family. Sadly, their house was destroyed in a flash by flood waters higher than the second floor of their home. Their clothes, furniture and appliances were all buried in mud after the flood subsided.

“We went to the high school for shelter when the flood hit our community”, she says. “After the flooding was over I tried to clean the mud from our home.  But a heavy rain came again, causing another flood.  May of us are getting sick… we must get our water from a pump.  We are in dire need of assistance.  It is really hard.  We appreciate the food you brought, but we will need more… and also blankets and used clothes.”

 Life was hard for them before the flood, but now life will be harder as they face the aftermath. They are in dire need of assistance in rebuilding their lives. Their health is also at stake as viruses, cold, coughs and skin infections are rampant. Outbreaks of deadly cholera, malaria, dengue fever and leptospirosis are a constant threat.  Despite these hardships, Mrs. Erlinda is moving forward for her children’s sake.  Although losing their home is depressing, she still has reasons to be thankful because her family survived the flood. As we talked with her, we saw the hope in her eyes and after our discussion; she managed to give us a warm smile but could not hide the pain and fear of the hardship to come. 

Andang Sarif, a 72-year old woman, is living alone in Marikina. She was born in Marawi City, Lanao del Sur but chose move to Marikina to avoid the armed conflict between Christians and Muslims in her home province. Unfortunately, her search for a safe and peaceful place to live in has been destroyed again. Her house was also one of those houses swept away by the flood, forcing her to stay in the Mosque during the heavy rains. “My house is not there anymore,” she said with the look of shock and despair.  “I am now sleeping outside in the mud because I have nothing left.” This was not the first time that this happened to her. Three years ago, her house was also destroyed by the Typhoon Ondoy. While still recovering from the damages caused by Ondoy, she would need to start all over again after the recent tragedy. Starting a life after an unexpected disaster is hard, but what makes it harder for Andang Sarif is that she would have to face these challenges alone.  She and her neighbors can maintain a glimmer of hope because of the presence of AAI staf and volunteers and the support we have received from our GlobalGiving partners from around the world.  We deeply  thank you for your kindness and generosity.  

Aug 14, 2012

Flood Relief for 2,000 Families in the Philippines

Surviving the Flood (Credit: ABC)
Surviving the Flood (Credit: ABC)

On the weekend of August 10, four days after devastating floods ravaged Manila and surrounding provinces. The Asia America Initiative began its flood relief effort with the support of funds from Global Giving, volunteers from numerous non-profit and community organizations, and transportation by rescue teams from the Civil Affairs Bureau of the Philippine armed forces. The volunteers began deliver aid to 200 families or more than1,000 persons in the heavily flooded Taguig neighborhood.  

On Monday August 13, AAI staff, volunteers, and partners continued purchasing food, medicines, clean water, and blankets for flood victims. They also began distributing supplies in other hard-to-reach communities that are still flooded, where disease is beginning to spread.  At present, a new typhoon is producing heavy rains, complicating the relief efforts.  According to government statistics, 89 people have already perished.  We seek your support to purchase enough medicine, food and water to serve, at minimum, 2,000 evacuated families or 12,000 persons, the majority of whom are children. 

Thank you.

Each Bag Contains Food, Medicine, and Soap
Each Bag Contains Food, Medicine, and Soap
Preparing Food for Distribution
Preparing Food for Distribution
Waiting in Line for Emergency Assistance (Reuters)
Waiting in Line for Emergency Assistance (Reuters)
Photo Credit: John Javellana/AP
Photo Credit: John Javellana/AP
AAI Staff Preparing Aid Materials
AAI Staff Preparing Aid Materials

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Funded

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.

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Organization

Project Leader

Albert Santoli

Washington, DC 20036, United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Providing Flood Relief for Families in Philippines