Cassava growing for food security in Kenya

 
$11,620
$780
Raised
Remaining
Community members participating in World Food Day
Community members participating in World Food Day

Maragua Division, Kenya

 

Dear Friends,

My community continues to benefit from the purchase of the mill to grind cassava to make food staples.  The enthusiasm for the project in my community continues to grow.  I am happy to report on the latest news.

Our community participated in the World Food Day Celebrations by holding a public forum on cassava on 16th, October 2012 at Kigumo Divisional headquarters. During the event, hundreds were taught on the benefits of the highly nutritious and drought resistant Cassava as a food, fodder and cash crop. The community members also utilized the opportunity to sell various cassava products including doughnuts, porridge, chips, and crisps. In the photos, are people buying and enjoying cassava dishes.

I am glad to inform you that our milling operation is modeled on the concept of a social business put forth by Muhammad Yunus. We charge only Ksh. 10 per 5 Kgs  instead of Ksh. 30 that the rest of the millers ask. This is to encourage consumption of cassava, as the villagers can now mill their dried cassava chips much more cheaply. This obviously encourages cassava cultivation. The little income accruing almost entirely goes into the running of the business through payment of its recurrent costs.


However, I am of the opinion that social enterprises experience some key challenges. They have to compete in the commercial market dominated by conventional businesses. This is in addition to facing the same operational challenges and risks as all other businesses. To overcome this challenge, the social enterprise should be of a relatively large size so that it can break even and manage to settle its recurrent expenditure. In Economics, this is referred to as "Economies of Scale." Social enterprises also lag behind in embracing technology. This is due to their low level of profits as opposed to what conventional businesses make. The competitors would easily manage to run more efficiently as they can utilize their comparatively large profit streams towards technological advancement and cost reduction. This kind of competition may lead to failure of social enterprises, if they are not large and mature enough.

If I get an opportunity to study for a Masters in Development Economics, I will focus on the role of social enterprises and Non- Governmental Organisations in poverty alleviation and economic development. I believe very little effort has been channeled towards realizing their potential as engines of economic development.

Thank you for your belief in our social business.  You are changing lives for the better.

 

Michael

Inside of cassava mill
Inside of cassava mill
Cassava plants in cultivation
Cassava plants in cultivation

Links:

Dear Donors,

Our cassava project continues to thrive and improve.  More and more communities are becoming interested in growing cassava because of its drought resistant qualities and good nutritional value. And, in my own community the cassava crop has become a stable of the local diet.  The success of the project, and its potential for contributing significantly to food security issues has drawn the attention of a number of officials and agencies, and we are pleased to be in a position of leadership in this area.

We were honored to host a government official recently.  The Minister for Nairobi Metropolitan Development, Hon. Jamleck Kamau, happened to have heard me speak about cassava on Kameme FM radio. Through his P.A, he arranged for me to meet him. I later invited him to visit at a time convenient to both of us. He did this last Saturday.  During his visit, he asked community members to form small groups based on their various factors,  eg. youth groups. He promised to rent for them plots to grow cassavas for income generation.

As you already may know, I grew up in abject poverty.  I skipped school on some days to work in nearby coffee estates to obtain the fees needed to sustain my schooling. As I grew up, I often declared to myself that my life would be dedicated to extreme poverty reduction. Formulating policies towards helping those suffering for only being born into poverty is my ultimate goal in life.  This project, and its success, has been an important step toward that goal.

Please see photos of the visit and of csme being interviewed by the media about cassava and the Minister’s visit.

Many thanks to all of you for believing in our cassava project for food security.  You are making a large difference in our community!

Michael

Bag of cassva from mill factory visited
Bag of cassva from mill factory visited

Dear Friends,

My community is extremely grateful for the purchase of the mill to grind cassava to make food staples.  The income of our community has increased greatly.  I am not through though.  My goal is to keep working to help my community to be as prosperous as possible.  It is in that vein that I relay the information below.

Dr. Joseph Kamau (a cassava expert from the Ministry of Agriculture) told the PATHWAYS scholars a story at the PATHWAYS annual meeting in 2008.  It was a story of a Nigerian who came to Kenya and lacked cassava gari- Nigeria’s staple food.  The Nigerian man decided to hire a small plot of land and started growing cassavas.  Later, he purchased a bigger plot of land and grow more cassava.   Thereafter, he started a small processing plant to add value to the cassavas that he was producing. Recently, he put up even another factory.  He mainly exports cassava products to foreign markets.  It is amazing that he is the only person doing that in the greater Eastern Africa region.  In Dr. Kamau's words, " he is minting money."

I have always desired to expose our community to such an experience so that at least they know what the cassavas that they are growing can be processed into. When I was on a long university vacation in January, I decided to go to the Ministry of Agriculture Headquarters to seek assistance. After 5 visits, I was introduced to one – Dr. Martha  Sila. She is the National head of the Root – crops Division. I absolutely narrated to her the story of our project, the support of PATHWAYS, of you, the Global Giving community and our objectives. She was impressed. She agreed to sponsor us to visit the Nigerian’s factories, as I had requested. I was pushing for 100 community members to participate, but she limited the number to 60 because they wanted to see only one bus used.

The 60 participants were selected as a perfect representative of the community:  women, men, youth, middle-aged and the aged. They visited last month. They went to the 2 factories. One is at Kasikeu, in the interior of Sultan Hamud and the other is at the lower end of  the Makueni  County. This is a 8 – hour one way journey from our area. All the expenses of the exposure tour were catered for.

The community members  were very excited and motivated. They were more than elated for experiencing what they could only imagine before.  Please see the photos of the trip.

Thank you for your continued support- you are changing lives for the better!

Michael

Community members gathering for visit
Community members gathering for visit
Community members viewing cassava factory
Community members viewing cassava factory

Links:

Building housing the mill
Building housing the mill

Murang'a County, Kenya

Dear Friends,

I am very excited to announce to you that we were able to purchase and install the mill to grind the cassava. The community is so happy! The building housing the mill was also renovated and electricity availed with the owner's assistance.  The machine installation was completed on Friday, 17th February.  The milling operation started immediately.

One of the great advantages of the mill is that the machines cannot only mill cassavas but also grains including corn.  Another advantage is the reduced cost.  We decided that the mill would be a social enterprise for the benefit of the community. Therefore the price charged for the milling service has been heavily subsidized. For 3kg of chopped cassavas or grains, we are charging Ksh. 10 (less than $0.10). The other millers charge Ksh. 30 for the 3kg of cassavas or grains. This is a great relief to a community wallowing in abject poverty. Plus, we are very sure that the income accruing is enough to sustain the mill and support other activities in the project.

Finally, another advantage is the reduced price for milling.  Before the mill you helped us purchase was put in place, the community members would have to purchase the milling service 7 kilometres away at Sabasaba town.  Now, the mill is so close!  Women are particularly excited and relieved of the agony and time spent in walking the long distance. They can now attend to more chores. Beyond any shred of doubt, the mill has proved to be a great achievement in the fight for food security.  We can’t thank you enough!

Please see attached the following photos.

 

Photo a : The building housing the mill. Remember, this is the building that appears on our GlobalGiving page.  But this time, the front is painted blue.

Photo b  : The 2 machines. On the right is the crusher that crushes chopped cassavas and grains. On the left, is the roller machine that finally grinds the crushed cassavas and grains into flour.

Photos c & d  : The trained operator packing the flour into customers' bags.

 

On behalf of our community, I sincerely thank you for supporting us in acquiring a mill. Surely, this is a milestone towards achieving food security.  You have surely changed many lives for the better while helping alleviate hunger!

 

Warm regards,

Michael Murigi.

The machines in the building
The machines in the building
Operator packing flour into bags
Operator packing flour into bags
Operating packing cassava flour for customer
Operating packing cassava flour for customer

Links:

Group
Group's office bearers

Murang'a County, Kenya

Dear Donors,

I just wanted to update you that many groups have been visiting us for training on cassava cultivation. We are very happy that we are able to spread the word and help others grow this drought resistant crop that can prevent famine. I wish to present a photo of our group's officials that was taken during such a training session last week.

In the photo are the group's office bearers, from left:

Michael Murigi    -  Patron

Jane Wainaina      - Chairperson

Lydiah Ndegwa   - Secretary

Julius Kamande    - Vice-Chairperson

Alice  Njoki         -  Vice Secretary

Racheal Wanjiku   -  Treasurer

Also captured in the photo, are cassava made food products. That is cassava porridge in the container, cassava doughnuts, chips, crisps, chapattis and ugali in the flasks. In the background, is a cassava crop growing in a garden.

Thank you very much for your continued support,

Michael

Women making cassava based food
Women making cassava based food
Training on cassava
Training on cassava

Links:

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Organization

Project Leader

Angie Gust

PATHWAYS Leadership for Progress
Lilburn, GA Kenya

Where is this project located?

Map of Cassava growing for food security in Kenya