Cambodian Disability Sports Development

 
$5,012
$44,988
Raised
Remaining
Jan 5, 2010

Images - Cambodian Volleyball World Cup 2009

Cambodian Volleyball World Cup 2009 A
Cambodian Volleyball World Cup 2009 A

View the WorldCup essay by internationally renowned Photographer Luke Duggleby on:

http://www.standupcambodia.net/index.php/world-cup/luke-duggleby-photo-essay

Cambodian Volleyball World Cup 2009 B
Cambodian Volleyball World Cup 2009 B
Cambodian Volleyball World Cup 2009 C
Cambodian Volleyball World Cup 2009 C
Jan 5, 2010

Germany Vote Cambodian World Cup - the best ever !

Asia Life - the best World Cup ever !
Asia Life - the best World Cup ever !

Germany Vote Cambodia Cellcard 2009 WOVD Volleyball World Cup Best Ever World Champions Germany unanimously voted the Cambodia Cellcard 2009 WOVD Volleyball World Cup the best tournament they'd ever attended at a team meeting prior to their departure on Monday.

Germany Coach Athanasious Papageorgiou and the team bade farewell to the local organising committee Monday morning and informed them of their vote taken the night before. The professionalism of the CNVLD together with the nationwide passion for the event, the electric atmosphere in the packed Olympic Stadium and the welcome from the Cambodian people all influenced the decision of the most experienced team in the world. Stars Oliver Gutfleisch and Robert Kampcyck remained in awe of the local support and highlighted the Germany Cambodia match as the most memorable of their lives. Never had the multiple world champions ever played before so many fans or witnessed such passion in support of athletes with a disability.

Coach 'Papa' felt that Cambodia had won regardless of the national team's unexpected forth place and had placed itself firmly on the map as a remarkable international venue. The bonds of friendship between the two teams goes back more than a decade and now after their second win on Cambodian soil, Germany are certain they will return and continue to stand up for standing volleyball with Cambodia.

Half the German team remained in Cambodia for an extended holiday on the coast, a direct socio-economic benefit to Cambodia as a result of the hosting an international sports event. The CNVLD congratulatesGermany once again for their victory as Cambodia Cellcard 2009 WOVD Volleyball World Cup Champions and wishes them safe journey home.

Cambodia Cellcard 2009 WOVD Volleyball World Cup:

Voted by World Champions Germany as the Best Tournament Ever

Oct 12, 2009

CSR Focus + The CNVLD - Lecture by CNVLD Chair Ms Mmaskepe Sejoe

CNVLD Chairperson Mmaskepe Sejoe gave a presentation on CSR, focusing on the CNVLD and ANZ Royal Bank,at the Australian African Business Council Investment Conference in Australia on 8th September 2009.

CNVLD Chairperson Mmaskepe Sejoe’s AAB Conference presentation is reproduced in full below.

Promotion of Human Rights through Good Corporate Citizenship Introduction

Human rights are not a new phenomenon in business, because they have a significant impact on accountability for human development. My interest is not to debate the performance of the sector, but to examine the potential value add in the protection and promotion of human rights. I am specifically interested in how business can promote:- • Human Rights , • Leadership in meeting human rights expectations and • Examples of where Good Corporate Leadership has been demonstrated

Business is experienced in ethical standards, because of the expected “trust” across all operations, particularly where there are a range of groups involved (shareholders, private and public interests etc). There is an expectation that with an evolving society, the expectations will change, so shall the standards to meet the changes.

In post-WW II human rights occupied a prominent space in public debates, but for some reason the focus was never on business or business practices until much later in the 20th century. Amazingly enough popular culture (in the form of Hollywood depictions of “white collar crime”, – Erin Brockovich and District 9), started to insinuate that there may be a shifting definition of criminal or unsavoury business practices. We started to see that business could have equally detrimental impact on societies like murderous thuggery that we have always associated with criminality. This seems to become more prominent in literature with a greater exposure to role of business and finance in positive/negative business accountability. This is where business leaders such as yourselves can act or through omission contribute to the violation of inherent rights and dignity of people often leading to “gross” violations of human rights.

You are best placed to articulate the complexities of the environment and the complex problem issues that may often lead to such human rights violations. The realization that members of the business sector can find themselves powerless in a system that deliberately inflicts sustained and untold suffering based on attitudes of “we are not moral police – we are concerned with business”. We have to take into account that the suffering generated by gross human rights violations is not limited to those whose rights we breach; it takes a little bit of our own humanity away. There are those who would argue that more often than not the “blind business leader” becomes a prisoner of his/her own blindness; he/she is never free from the business of his/her silence. Over the past year, we have seen the change in attitude across the world on “Corporate Citizenship” and in fact over the past ten years we have seen the shift in acceptance that business/money is not value free. For example The Swiss Banks are learning that they could not possibly justify their see no evil hear no evil and protect investments at all cost. The world is happy to revise history and accuse the Swiss of having knowingly colluded with the Nazis in appropriating Jewish asserts, so in other words they were party to gross violations of human rights.

It is important to recognize that business decisions that translate as acts of omission can and do contribute to the violation of inherent rights and often leading to “gross” violations of human rights.

Could it be the conceptualizations of business and human suffering? I will take a lot of liberty here in assuming that often the lack of recognition of business leaders as human rights advocates/protectors and promoters maybe due to the limited interpretation of the principles of business accountability. This maybe due to interpreting values in a limited sense based on “PROFIT/MARKET FORCES” conceptualization “BUSINESS” rather than a broad human development concern. There are codes of conduct that regulate all matters relating to business processes; of course, in years gone by they have not taken the bigger picture of overall human development into account. By focusing on “profit” or dare I say “RISK- TAKING/COW BOY” behaviour exclusively, there has been no room for consideration of the people involved. As such, this often impedes on the relationship between business and protection of human rights. Of course, there is a lot more expectation to look beyond profit to the consequences of violations of human rights.

It is critical that conceptualisations of business management/finance and human suffering are driven by human rights concerns. To avoid this would mean being drawn into roles of a highly politicised environment, and thus become willing and unwilling participants in human rights violations, which serve the partisan interests of the state and other actors. My limited experience with business practices tells me that the business professionals I have met are equipped to respond to suffering within a human rights context, whether this is recognised widely is highly debatable.

I’m sure each one of you could tell a story of the blurred lines, where you have known that the “company-line” could have detrimental impact on the lives of the people within and wider than the organisation. It is not for me to question or interpret professional standards or ethics, but I would assume that community expectations are drivers and may not recognise the difference between active participation in human rights violations and “standing by.”

There is a growing view that standing by in the face of human rights violations constitutes “complicity”, I chose not to render my opinion on this, as I do not understand the challenges that you face everyday in your work. But if business/finance practice does impact on the wellbeing of people, then doing nothing can be more challenging to explain to society, despite the fact that the notion of finance/business as part of the human rights discourse is relatively a recent development.

For those who are have maintained interest in human rights over the years, you will know that the Anti-Corruption initiatives have brought human rights into focus in business. On October 31st 2003, the UN General Assembly adopted the UN Convention Against Corruption, which came into force on December 14th 2005. It is worth noting that Switzerland is not a signatory.

This is just one instrument that clearly brings business practice into the realm of human rights. However, this instrument goes beyond the common expectation that business needs only consider labour and environmental provisions to be compliant of human rights expectations.

The fact that to practice as a business/corporation, there are regulatory and legislative parameters that articulate expectations, and practice standards, it is implicit that any human rights provisions would be incorporated into such standards. Of course the nature of multi-nationals makes “national values” difficult to define. While human rights provisions or state commitment to human rights is usually measured by;  lawful basis to uphold and respect rights  availability of mechanisms for redress made available by government should there be interference with the enjoyment of the rights  Positive obligations indicated by economic resources made available by government.

Human rights expectations for multi-nationals are much more fluid and present incredible challenges for human rights compliance. To address this, the UN has developed a set of principles to support business practices internationally. These are across four critical areas: 1 Human Rights a) Principle 1: Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights; and b) Principle 2: make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses. 2 Labour a) Principle 3: Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining; b) Principle 4: the elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour; c) Principle 5: the effective abolition of child labour; and d) Principle 6: the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation. 3 Environment a) Principle 7: Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges; b) Principle 8: undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility; and c) Principle 9: Encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies. 4 Anti Corruption a) Principle 10: Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery.

The critical issue here is that the intent of these principles revisits values that may have been forgotten in our “market driven” environment. For the purpose of today, I want to draw your attention to how ANZ and DEBSWANA have interpreted the UN human rights principles and showed that corporate citizenship is achievable.

To explore this I have chosen two case studies, both leaders in their respective field, mining and banking: 1. DEBSWANA – DeBeers & Botswana Government, the relationship which was described by Ex-President Mogae while he was the vise President of Botswana as “The partnership between De Beers and Botswana has been likened to a marriage. I sometimes wonder whether a better analogy might not be that of Siamese twins.” 2. ANZ – Which is a banking leader in both Australia and South East Asia, has

Sep 29, 2009

Southeast Asia Globe Eagles and Global Giving Scorpions to Face Off in CNVLD 2009 Grand Final

The Siem Reap Globe Eagles will face the Kompong Speu Global Giving Scorpions in the 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League Grand Finals on 16 October.

After sensationally trouncing every team in the 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League, Siem Reap Globe Eagles staked their nest at the top of the table with an amazing 9-0 match record while only losing 3 sets on their storming flight to the finals. Kompong Speu Global Giving Scorpions clinched second place having lost only two matches to Siem Reap and third place team Kompong Speu CTN Koupreys. The Scorpions, 2008’s 3rd place team, narrowly clinched their finals berth by just one set lost over the Koupreys who had also won 7 of their 9 games and take 3rd. The Scorpions came close to losing their slimmest of margins after dropping a set in a tight match against 6th place Takeo ISPP Templestowe Falcons but held on to ensure their finals spot with a comprehensive 3-0 thrashing of 8th place Prey Veng Kingmaker Cobras. The 3rd-4th place play-off will see 2008 National Volleyball League Champions Kompong Speu CTN Koupreys square up to 6-times National League Champions Phnom Penh ANZ Royal Dragons who managed to halt their abrupt slide down the rankings on the last day of competition to steal 4th by defeating newcomers Kompong Cham Bartu Bulls and narrowly overcoming Kratie Nike Changemakers Dolphins.

The 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League Grand Finals will see the top four teams in the country play for the coveted positions of Champions and 2nd-3rd places along with the largest purse in Cambodian sports. The National League Champions will take home $3000 with 2nd pocketing $2000 and 3rd sharing $1000. While the dollars provide adequate incentive, there is little doubt that provincial pride is what’s truly at stake.

The 4th Round Competition held at the Olympic Stadium on 25-26 September once again witnessed some of the most competitive volleyball in the history of the league with 5th place Battambang MOSVY Tigers only missing out on a play-off spot by 2 lost sets to Phnom Penh ANZ Royal Dragons. Dragons Coach Kim Horn is now planning a radical overhaul of his team through an injection of new young athletes into his aging squad after their worst performance in years. With only Takeo ISPP Templestowe Falcons to play at the weekend, both Takeo and Battambang mathematically had a chance for a play-off spot, but Battambang’s team spirit prevailed over a lethargic Falcons team who had earlier pushed the Scorpions to the limit with the north-west team swiping an easy 3-0 victory leaving Takeo ISPP Templestowe Falcons to take a respectable 6th.

At the tail end of the table, Kratie Nike Changemakers Dolphins battled through a 5-set marathon against Phnom Penh to narrowly lose out 2-3 before being given a swift lesson in net work by the domineering Eagles to lose 0-3. However, victory over Kompong Cham, Prey Veng and Pailin over the course of the season leaves Kratie in a respectable 7th place. Close behind in 8th are newcomers and the surprise of the year, Kompong Cham Bartu Bulls who genuinely impressed everyone with their team spirit, morale and love of the game. Led by National Team spiker Sang Veasna, the Bulls have quickly established themselves as a force to be reckoned with and even took a set off Phnom Penh on the final day of the season. 2010 will see former National Team player Pin Ty take the coaching reins in Kompong Cham with Sang Veasna tasked with establishing a crack new team in Kandal province.

Prey Veng Kingmaker Cobras and Pailin Frechen Lions prop up the bottom of the ladder with a 1-8 and 0-9 record respectively. Prey Veng could consider themselves unlucky after a number of very close matches and the Cobras remain one of the most consistent and tight knit teams in the league, hindered only by a distinct lack of height at the net with the departure of 6-footer Met Mean to Kratie. It’s back to the drawing board for Pailin though who had their most disastrous season since joining the National League in 2006. Coach Khem Pheng Tong had no excuses for his underachieving side which was once feared nationwide for their aggressive style of play. Expect a rejuvenated team to enter the court in 2010!

With the 2009 Cellcard WOVD Cambodia World Cup just around the corner in December, selection for the Cambodian National Team is dominating team talks and National Coach Christian Zepp has the potential to pick a dream team with a real chance of clinching the World #1 position.

The CNVLD wishes to thank Cellcard and all the team sponsors in the 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League as well as R.O Water and the volunteer team from DDD and ANZ Royal Bank for helping to make this year’s national league the best ever.

Sep 29, 2009

Southeast Asia Globe Eagles and Global Giving Scorpions to Face Off in CNVLD 2009 Grand Final

The Siem Reap Globe Eagles will face the Kompong Speu Global Giving Scorpions in the 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League Grand Finals on 16 October.

After sensationally trouncing every team in the 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League, Siem Reap Globe Eagles staked their nest at the top of the table with an amazing 9-0 match record while only losing 3 sets on their storming flight to the finals. Kompong Speu Global Giving Scorpions clinched second place having lost only two matches to Siem Reap and third place team Kompong Speu CTN Koupreys. The Scorpions, 2008’s 3rd place team, narrowly clinched their finals berth by just one set lost over the Koupreys who had also won 7 of their 9 games and take 3rd. The Scorpions came close to losing their slimmest of margins after dropping a set in a tight match against 6th place Takeo ISPP Templestowe Falcons but held on to ensure their finals spot with a comprehensive 3-0 thrashing of 8th place Prey Veng Kingmaker Cobras. The 3rd-4th place play-off will see 2008 National Volleyball League Champions Kompong Speu CTN Koupreys square up to 6-times National League Champions Phnom Penh ANZ Royal Dragons who managed to halt their abrupt slide down the rankings on the last day of competition to steal 4th by defeating newcomers Kompong Cham Bartu Bulls and narrowly overcoming Kratie Nike Changemakers Dolphins.

The 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League Grand Finals will see the top four teams in the country play for the coveted positions of Champions and 2nd-3rd places along with the largest purse in Cambodian sports. The National League Champions will take home $3000 with 2nd pocketing $2000 and 3rd sharing $1000. While the dollars provide adequate incentive, there is little doubt that provincial pride is what’s truly at stake.

The 4th Round Competition held at the Olympic Stadium on 25-26 September once again witnessed some of the most competitive volleyball in the history of the league with 5th place Battambang MOSVY Tigers only missing out on a play-off spot by 2 lost sets to Phnom Penh ANZ Royal Dragons. Dragons Coach Kim Horn is now planning a radical overhaul of his team through an injection of new young athletes into his aging squad after their worst performance in years. With only Takeo ISPP Templestowe Falcons to play at the weekend, both Takeo and Battambang mathematically had a chance for a play-off spot, but Battambang’s team spirit prevailed over a lethargic Falcons team who had earlier pushed the Scorpions to the limit with the north-west team swiping an easy 3-0 victory leaving Takeo ISPP Templestowe Falcons to take a respectable 6th.

At the tail end of the table, Kratie Nike Changemakers Dolphins battled through a 5-set marathon against Phnom Penh to narrowly lose out 2-3 before being given a swift lesson in net work by the domineering Eagles to lose 0-3. However, victory over Kompong Cham, Prey Veng and Pailin over the course of the season leaves Kratie in a respectable 7th place. Close behind in 8th are newcomers and the surprise of the year, Kompong Cham Bartu Bulls who genuinely impressed everyone with their team spirit, morale and love of the game. Led by National Team spiker Sang Veasna, the Bulls have quickly established themselves as a force to be reckoned with and even took a set off Phnom Penh on the final day of the season. 2010 will see former National Team player Pin Ty take the coaching reins in Kompong Cham with Sang Veasna tasked with establishing a crack new team in Kandal province.

Prey Veng Kingmaker Cobras and Pailin Frechen Lions prop up the bottom of the ladder with a 1-8 and 0-9 record respectively. Prey Veng could consider themselves unlucky after a number of very close matches and the Cobras remain one of the most consistent and tight knit teams in the league, hindered only by a distinct lack of height at the net with the departure of 6-footer Met Mean to Kratie. It’s back to the drawing board for Pailin though who had their most disastrous season since joining the National League in 2006. Coach Khem Pheng Tong had no excuses for his underachieving side which was once feared nationwide for their aggressive style of play. Expect a rejuvenated team to enter the court in 2010!

With the 2009 Cellcard WOVD Cambodia World Cup just around the corner in December, selection for the Cambodian National Team is dominating team talks and National Coach Christian Zepp has the potential to pick a dream team with a real chance of clinching the World #1 position.

The CNVLD wishes to thank Cellcard and all the team sponsors in the 2009 Cellcard National Volleyball League as well as R.O Water and the volunteer team from DDD and ANZ Royal Bank for helping to make this year’s national league the best ever.

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating or by subscribing to this project's RSS feed.

Retired Project

This project is no longer accepting donations.

Still want to help?
Find another project in Cambodia or in Health that needs your help.

Project Leader

Christopher Minko

Secretary-General
Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh Cambodia

Where is this project located?

Map of Cambodian Disability Sports Development