Building leaders using education & local projects

 
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Jemimah
Jemimah's project-poultry house construction

8th Report  November 30, 2012

 

Dear Donors,

 

Thank you so much for supporting Dennis Mutwiri, Nafisa Ayuko, and Michael Murigi, who have benefited greatly from the combination of university education and leadership training through community development activities. As we reported in August, graduated and is now teaching at a girls school, so we have asked Jemimah, another PATHWAYS scholar, to report on her project. The members of the communities have continued to benefit through the projects the PATHWAYS scholars have initiated. Below is an update on the specific progress they have made to improve the lives of their community members and their community environments.

Jemimah Peters report- Improvement of the local economy through developing a water source to aid food security

Dear Friends,

I would like to take this chance to give an update on my project. At the moment the poultry project implementation is going on well. After a long discussion, our women’s group decided that the poultry house would be constructed at the church compound as that is the central point and also to avoid any misunderstandings that could possibly emerge if it was constructed at a member's home. As the first phase of the poultry house construction, the members dug the foundation, and brought together the required materials like sand, construction stones and bricks. The construction has already started (see photos) and they hope to complete it in the next three weeks. From the healthy discussion they had with my fellow PATHWAYS scholars who visited my project, they have decided that they are at first going keep the local breed of chicken, unlike we had earlier planned for layers, which will be very expensive to maintain. They are very optimistic about the project and they just can't wait to see the outcome. For the farming, they had decided to transplant their seedlings once it rains as they are expecting rains. But as Alphonse, my fellow PATHWAYS scholar, shared, it is still very dry and dusty and the rivers are also dry. But they are hoping that soon it is going to rain. The members appreciate the help that the water tanks purchased earlier have been to them. Besides watering their crops it has helped the church members and especially on Sundays because the water is used for drinking and cooking among other uses. This has helped the mothers because before,it was still their responsibility every Sunday to bring water to church with jerrycans. Therefore, with water available in the tanks, it has reduced their burden and that of other community members of carrying water every Sunday. Again as a self help group which is registered, they have benefited from seminars which are normally organized by the ministry of agriculture and specifically for registered groups to learn more about ways of farming in dry areas. Even though there has been no  improvement in their income as per now,they are determined to move on as they look forward to more growth and expansion of the project. With the motivation and inspiration they got from my fellow PATHWAYS scholars, Dennis,Alphonse and Brian, I know there is going to be a great improvement.

I am looking forward to communicating with you about our progress.  Thank you so much for your support of our efforts to help improve our local economy.

Jemimah

Dennis Mutwiri’s project Solar panels, planting trees and fish farming.

Dear Global Giving Donors and Friends,

It is my hope that you are doing well. Am also good. I traveled home and I met and spent time with my group's members. We held a meeting to review the year 2012 and discuss the way forward. We had an opportunity to analyze and discuss each of the four projects. In this report, I will shed light on each of them. 

i. Fish Farming Project

I begin with appreciating your aid in fencing the pond. We bought materials to complete this work and fencing will resume after members set a day to work on this. I had reported earlier that the Ministry had supplied us with 300 fingerlings. The group had earlier made effort to put more fingerlings ahead of the Ministry's supply. In total, the pond holds approximately 700 fish with around 400 ready for sale. In terms of feeding, the Ministry provides food for the fish. In October last year, we received 100 Kg of fish feeds. This will go a long way since a grown fish consumes only 3g daily. We have appointed a chairperson who attends the fish daily and attends seminars regarding fish farming frequently.

As at now, at least two thirds of the pond's population is ready for market.

The Ministry had allocated four ponds in our location, however, it is only our pond that has survived and raised the fish. The rest failed. This has impacted us negatively in the sense that the Ministry meant to market our product in bulk. The targeted quantity is cannot be reached as at now hence the delay. My group officials are however negotiating with the responsible officers to get things done.

ii. Tree nursery Project

We realized that the most demanded trees are the exotic ones. This realization came by when the forestry department that had agreed to purchase the indigenous breed failed us. We were only able to sell very few of the trees and distributed others to members who were willing to plant them. It is from this that we put up an exotic trees nursery in September so that the trees would be ready during the April/May long rains.

In the previous season, three of our members planted 50 exotic trees from our nursery. The trees are now grown and will be of benefit soon.

iii. Solar Power Project

The project is fairly doing well. We are still carrying on green energy campaign in the region. The main challenge of late is the government's initiative to electrify rural areas under Rural Electrification Authority. This has greatly shifted the region's interests from solar to electric power. We are hoping that they will soon see some sense in what we stand for with time. 

However, those who are continuing to purchase the solar kit are at the moment reaping a great deal of benefits (see photos). The member is using the power for lighting and powering a radio set (also pictured). Commercially, she charges people's mobile phones in the neighborhood at the rate of sh. 10 per phone. She uses the money to repay the solar. She says that, of late she has cut costs on fuel and charging her own phone and those the rest of the family members. 

We are looking forward to intensify this trend among the members and community in general.

iv. Merry-go-round

    This project has been of immense benefit to every member in the group. Three members can now borrow sh. 10000 while five can borrow up to sh. 8000. The interest rate is still 10%. Initially, we were loaning out everything to make our capital grow. But from the 15th of this month, the members agreed that they will be banking sh. 4000 monthly to secure the project.

The group members agreed to save money in all the projects in order to start other projects like sheep rearing which is more viable and profitable.   

As always, I want to extend my deep appreciation on behalf of myself and all of my community members for your constant support,

Thank you!

Dennis.

 Michael Murigi’s report -Growing cassava for food security and income.

Dear Donors,

I am happy to report that our community participated in the World Food Day Celebrations by holding a public forum on cassava on 16th, October 2012 at Kigumo Divisional headquarters. During the event, hundreds were taught on the benefits of the highly nutritious and drought resistant Cassava as a food, fodder and cash crop. The community members also utilized the opportunity to sell various cassava products including doughnuts, porridge,chips, crisps (see photos of people buying and enjoying cassava products).

A few months ago I was invited to the AGRA dinner. AGRA is a group that promotes food security in Africa. It was one of the best moments in my life. Being amidst technocrats from all over Africa. From outside AGRA, Prof. Agnes Wang'ombe, the Principal, College of Agriculture, University of Nairobi and I were the only Kenyans in attendance. I was by  far the youngest guest, all the others being Professors and Doctorate holders. I made a brief presentation of how we are enhancing food security through cassava . We celebrated Dr. Namanga Ngongi , from Cameroon, for  his efforts towards a green revolution in Africa as the First President of AGRA. It was a wonderful experience!

Many thanks to all of you for believing in our cassava project for food security.  You are making a large difference in our community!

Michael

Jemimah
Jemimah's project-women's group discussing project
Dennis
Dennis's project_tree nursery
Dennis
Dennis's project-solar panel on rooftop
Michael
Michael's project-participating in World Food Day
Michael
Michael's project-people enjoying cassava products

Links:

Dear Donors,

Thank you so much for supporting Dennis Mutwiri, Nafisa Ayuko, and Michael Murigi, who have benefited greatly from the combination of university education and leadership training through community development activities. Nafisa has recently graduated so we have asked Jemimah, another PATHWAYS scholar, to report on her project.  She has kindly agreed. The members of the community have continued to benefit through the projects the PATHWAYS scholars have initiated. Below is an update on the specific progress they have made to improve the lives of their community members and their community environments.

Jemimah Peters report- Improvement of the local economy through developing a water source to aid food security

Dear Friends,

I am a second year PATHWAYS scholar majoring in Mathematics at the University of Nairobi.  Nafisa has graduated, so I have the honor of now communicating to you about my project in her place.  My project in my home community in Kitui Central is to help provide water to improve food security and the overall economy.  Our women’s group is comprised of 15 women. They are excited about what PATHWAYS and Global Giving is assisting them to achieve.  Last year, funds were allocated to purchase a water tank (see photo) to collect rain water for the crops the women are planting.  The water tank is of particular importance since the area is very prone to drought. The members have been doing horticultural farming whereby they planted sukuma wikis and tomatoes (see photo). The income generated has been reinvested in the project and assisted in buying other requirements like fertilizers and pesticides.

Our community’s major source of water is a seasonal stream which is about a kilometer away.  During dry seasons like now, the stream is dry, and people dig holes in the stream (because the level is shallow) and use containers to draw it (see a photo of a woman fetching water).  Back at the seasonal stream, some groups and schools are digging boreholes.  A nearby boarding high school has done this and piped water to the school which is adequate for their use.  We are thinking of digging a borehole to help serve as a consistent source of water for our farming project.

I am looking forward to communicating with you about our progress.  Thank you so much for your support of our efforts to help improve our local economy.

Jemimah

Dennis Mutwiri’s project Solar panels, planting trees and fish farming.

Dear Global Giving Donors and Friends,

So far, all continues to go well with our project. We have new seedlings for planting in the next rainy season, but as I had mentioned earlier, the trees we are raising are not indigenous. We expect that the new trees will perform extremely well in the region and their demand will be high, as well. (see photo)

The solar project is also running well and we have members reaping from it. It has helped in saving household income by substituting perfectly for fuels. More importantly, it has become an income generating project for community and group members. They are all happy and contented with the benefits they are getting from the solar equipment. It is indeed achieving its key objectives in society. So far, we have had 18 families install the panels. The total number of direct beneficiaries, in this case, is well over 100 heads. We are glad it has been of such impact and benefit to us all. 

The fish farming project has had great progress. We had an officer visiting from the Fisheries Department and after sampling, he recommended that we keep them a little longer for better development. This will make them ready for market. My group is intending to conduct a community education whereby we will be demonstrating the nutritional benefits of fish and how to cook them. This will be a form of marketing after which we will later proceed to sell fish to the community. 

The merry-go-round project has continued to grow and is benefiting over 15 families with a total of 90 members. The project has also been of benefit to more community members who are in connection to the 90 direct beneficiaries. We hope to achieve higher numbers in the future and impact a larger area. 

As always, I want to extend my deep appreciation on behalf of myself and all of my community members for your constant support,

Dennis

Michael Murigi’s report -Growing cassava for food security and income.

Dear Donors,

As you already may know, I grew up in abject poverty.  I skipped school to work in nearby coffee estates to sustain my schooling. As I grew up, I often declared to myself that my life would be dedicated to extreme poverty reduction. Formulating policies towards helping those suffering for only being born into poverty is my ultimate goal in life.

Our cassava project continues to thrive and improve.  In fact, the Minister for Nairobi Metropolitan Development, Hon. Jamleck Kamau, happened to have heard me speak about cassava on Kameme FM radio. Through his P.A, he arranged for me to meet him. I later invited him to visit at a time convenient to both of us. He did this last Saturday.  During his visit, he asked community members to form small groups based on their factors  of wish eg. youth groups. He promised to rent for them plots to grow cassavas for income generation.
Attached to this mail are some of the photos taken.

Many thanks to all of you for believing in our cassava project for food security.  You are making a large difference in our community!

Michael

Links:

Nafisa
Nafisa's community goat

6th Report May 28, 2012

Dear Donors,

Thank you so much for supporting Dennis Mutwiri, Nafisa Ayuko, and Michael Murigi, who have benefited greatly from the combination of university education and leadership training through community development activities. Importantly, their communities have benefited as much as they have.  The projects have all progressed well as initial plans have been implemented and expanded.  Below is an update on the specific progress they have made to improve the lives of their community members and their community environments.

Nafisa Ayuka’s report -  Improvement of girl child education through raising poultry and sanitary towels.

Sewing: The women’s group continues to be very pleased with the sewing machine and sewing skills they have learned through initiation of my project.  They make children’s clothes and school uniforms.   The profits are helping them pay the school fees for their children and purchase school supplies.

Sanitary towels: The reusable sanitary towel project has really helped the girls stay in school during their monthly periods.  We were going to use this project as an income generating project, but when we found that girls have such little money, we ended up just giving the towels to the girls and also teaching them to make their own.

Goats: The group has acquired a few goats (see photo).  The woman can sell the goat milk and along with the poultry, this is a good income generation project. 

I will be graduating in June and hope to get a job teaching in a school near my village.  I so enjoyed my time student teaching at St. Clares Maragoli Girls Secondary School. I loved working with the girls during my student teaching program.

I have learned a lot over the last four years being a PATHWAYS scholar.  I am looking forward to continuing to help my community and country.

Nafisa

Dennis Mutwiri’s project Solar panels, planting trees and fish farming.

I call my members frequently for updates and consultations to keep everything on track. So far, all is well and running to expectation.

Trees: We have new seedlings for planting in the next rainy season, but as I had mentioned earlier, the trees we are raising are not indigenous. We expect that the new trees will perform extremely well in the region and their demand will be high, as well.

Solar Project: The solar project is also running well and we have members reaping from it. It has helped in saving household income by substituting perfectly for fuels. More importantly, it has become an income generating project for community and group members. They are all happy and contented with the benefits they are getting from the solar equipment. It is indeed achieving its key objectives in society. So far, we have had 18 families install the panels. The total number of direct beneficiaries, in this case, is well over 100 heads. We are glad it has been of such impact and benefit to us all. 

Fish Farming: The fish farming project has had great progress. We had an officer visiting from the Fisheries department and after sampling, he recommended that we keep them a little longer for better development. This will make them ready for market. My group is intending to conduct a community education whereby we will be demonstrating the nutritional benefits of fish and how to cook them. This will be a form of marketing after which we will later proceed to sell fish to the community. 

Merry Go Round or Microloan Project: The merry-go-round project has continued to grow and is benefiting over 15 families with a total of 90 members. The project has also been of benefit to more community members who are in connection to the 90 direct beneficiaries. We hope to achieve higher numbers in the future and impact a larger area. 

Thank you for helping me help my community!

Dennis 

Michael Murigi’s report -Growing cassava for food security and income.

Cassava:  To help the community better understand what possibilities there are will the production of cassava, I decided to go to the Ministry of Agriculture Headquarters  to seek for assistance on an exposure tour. After 5 visits, I was introduced to one, Dr. Martha  Sila. She is the National head of the Root - Crops Division. I absolutely narrated to her the story of our project and our objectives. She was impressed. She agreed to sponsor us to visit the Nigerian's factory, as I had requested. I was pushing for 100 community members to participate in the tour but she limited the number to 60 because they wanted to see only one bus used. The 60 community members, picked from different families, visited the factory in Makueni County, about 350 Kilometres from our area, last month.

It was an absolute success.  The community group was exposed to the factory and the possibilities for expanding our mill operation.

See photos showing the community members traveling by bus to the factory and members holding produced flour.

As I plan to dedicate my life to the service of poor people throughout the developing world, this has been a great learning experience for me.

Again, THANK YOU, for your help to help my community help themselves!

Michael

Dennis
Dennis's fish pond
Dennis
Dennis's community members planting trees
Michael
Michael's community ready to take trip
Michael
Michael's community members viewing cassava flour

Links:

Women with handmade clothes
Women with handmade clothes

 

5th Report March 16, 2012

Nafisa Ayuka’s report -  Improvement of girl child education through raising poultry and sanitary towels.

Sewing: The women are continuing with the project well with sewing of uniforms and clothes (see photo of women with finished hand made clothes).  The sewing machines help immensely with the work so we can make more clothes and uniforms each day.  The women make clothes and uniforms both for themselves and their children and also for sale to others.  This is a big economic boost.  The proceeds help the women help their children with school fees. 

Sanitary towels: A set of reusable sanitary towels was given to local adolescent girls (see photo).  The girls have little money to pay for sanitary towels so this service of giving them the towels for free is very much appreciated by them and their mothers. The girls have been practicing making the towels on their won and are pleased with their new-found skill.

Poultry: The poultry project is going on well.  The number of chickens is continuing to increase (see photo of chickens).  Profits from selling the chickens averages approximately $60 per month.  The profits are shared among the community members.  The money makes it easier on families to pay school fees for their children especially girls.

I am in my last semester of university and am looking forward to graduating and getting a teaching job. 

Working with my community on this project has really developed leadership skills in me that I can use in the future.

Thank you sincerely for your contributions to help me help my community.

Nafisa

Dennis Mutwiri’s project Solar panels, planting trees and fish farming.

Fish: We bought materials to complete fencing of the pond and fencing will resume after members set a day to work on this (see photo of pond). I had reported earlier that the Ministry had supplied us with 300 fingerlings. The group had earlier made effort to put more fingerlings ahead of the Ministry's supply. In total, the pond holds approximately 700 fish with around 400 ready for sale. In terms of feeding, the Ministry provides food for the fish. In October last year, we received 100 Kg of fish feeds. This will go a long way since a grown fish consumes only 3g daily. We have appointed a chairperson who attends the fish daily and attends seminars regarding fish farming frequently.

As at now, at least two thirds of the pond's population is ready for market.

The Ministry had allocated four ponds in our location, however, it is only our pond that has survived and raised the fish. The rest failed. This has impacted us negatively in the sense that the Ministry meant to market our product in bulk. The targeted quantity is cannot be reached as at now hence the delay. My group officials are however negotiating with the responsible officers to get things done.

Tree nursery: We realized that the most demanded trees are the exotic ones. This realization came by when the forestry department that had agreed to purchase the indigenous breed failed us. We were only able to sell very few of the trees and distributed others to members who were willing to plant them. It is from this that we put up an exotic trees nursery in September so that the trees would be ready during the April/May long rains (see photo of tree nursery). In the previous season, three of our members planted 50 exotic trees from our nursery. The trees are now grown and will be of benefit soon.

Solar power:The project is fairly doing well. We are still carrying on green energy campaign in the region. The main challenge of late is the government's initiative to electrify rural areas under Rural Electrification Authority. This has greatly shifted the region's interests from solar to electric power. We are hoping that they will soon see some sense in what we stand for with time. 

However, those who are continuing to purchase the solar kit are at the moment reaping a great deal of benefits. See the photo of a member who is using the power for lighting and powering a radio set. Commercially, he charges people's mobile phones in the neighborhood at the rate of sh. 10 per phone. He uses the money to repay the solar. He says that, of late he has cut costs on fuel and charging his own phone and those the rest of the family members. 

We are looking forward to intensify this trend among the members and community in general.

Merry go round or loan group: This project has been of immense benefit to every member in the group. Three members can now borrow sh. 10000 while five can borrow up to sh. 8000. The interest rate is still 10%. Initially, we were loaning out everything to make our capital grow. But from the 15th of February, the members agreed that they will be banking sh. 4000 monthly to secure the project.

The group members agreed to save money in all the projects in order to start other projects like sheep rearing which is more viable and profitable.  

Thank you for your support of these projects in my community.  We are really making progress!

Dennis 

Michael Murigi’s report -Growing cassava for food security and income.

Mill: Great news!  The necessary bank transactions were made for payment of the mill.  The mill was purchased to better utilize the cassava crops the community has grown.  Flour can be made from the cassava then turned into food products to sell.  On Saturday, we received a notification from the firm that they had already received  the total amount that they had asked for. Meanwhile, the owner of the premises that we are renting has been very co-operative. To ensure total  security of the mill,  yesterday, we spent the day reinforcing the roof.  I  am very pleased to inform you that the mill installation process was completed yesterday and the milling started immediately (see photo). The mill will be of great help to the community as it can mill not only cassavas but also grains including corn. Today, we are putting on a firm wooden ceiling. Tomorrow, we will be fencing. The next day, we will be reinforcing the door and the windows.

On behalf of our community, please accept our big THANK YOU to you for supporting us.  We have really appreciated their gestures of kindness and generosity. We lack the best words to express our appreciation. You have assisted us a great deal in ensuring the development and sustainability of our project. We will not let you down.

Again, THANK YOU, indeed.

Michael

Girls with reusable sanitary towels
Girls with reusable sanitary towels
Poultry
Poultry
Fenced pond
Fenced pond
Tree nursery
Tree nursery
Member powering radio set
Member powering radio set
Mill
Mill

Links:

Nafisa: Reusable sanitary towels
Nafisa: Reusable sanitary towels

Our three PATHWAYS scholars are doing well in university and continuing to work on their community projects. Nafisa is a senior at the University of Nairobi and just finished her student teaching at St. Clares Maragoli Girls Secondary School.  She is looking forward to graduating next year and starting her teaching career.  Dennis and Michael are both juniors at the University of Nairobi, majoring in Economics and have both returned home to their communities for the holiday break.  Below is a brief update on their community projects. Your support is helping them become leaders through working to improve their communities.

Nafisa

The sewing project is doing well.  The group members informed me that they have completed the second bundle of sanitary towels and they are going to give them out soon as gifts to the girls.  This will be part of a celebration together.

Families are now enjoying the goat and poultry projects because they can now sell part of what they have helping them earn income for necessities and even Christmas presents.

I was completed an internship with through with internship with Solidarity for the Advancement of Women group which was a very enlightening experience.  Now I am half way through the first semester of my fourth year. Time has moved so fast and I hope to graduate next year and get a job immediately and continue to support my community project.

I appreciate your support to me and my project!

Nafisa

Dennis

The introduction of the solar or green energy has been going very well. Training of the group members on the installation and operation of solar appliances has been ongoing and the community is continuing to be sensitized on the merits of using solar energy.  The solar kit has been used for lighting, powering radios and charging mobile phones.  Community members have earned 60000 KSH from sale of solar panels and batteries(Gross).

The  25M by 15M pond dugout pond has been a benefit to our members.  Proceeds from selling the fish have helped families pay their children’s school fees.

Our micro-credit program is going well too. Members are finding they can start income generating projects, they said it has really helped them become more stable financially.

You have made a large difference to the members of our community!

Thank you!

Dennis


Michael 

As you may have heard there is famine in East Africa including our area of Kenya. Our cassava project has been able to bring residents together to fight the this  food scarcity in a way that has never been experienced before. Women organize themselves in groups to work in each other's cassava plots.

This is to make sure that everyone is taking cassava cultivation seriously. This has brought cohesion and hope that the community can also solve the other challenges facing it, communally.

Cassava has revolutionized preparation of foods during ceremonies in our community. Due to the high cost of wheat flour, women have been grinding their dried cassava using the traditional mortar and pestle. This flour is used to prepare chapattis and porridge during ceremonies.

On another note, our PATHWAYS vice president, Dr. Mbaabu Mathiu, sent a team of water experts to our village to find out of a borehole can be dug to successfully produce water. Everybody was very happy especially women and children who have to trek long distances in search of water. The community was very hopeful that they get a nearer and reliable source of water. The area Chief has also written an official  letter authorizing the  use of  the public

ground for a community water project. We are very thankful and hopeful that the twin problem in the area - food and water shortage -is solved soon.

Thank you for supporting our community.  We are extremely grateful to you!

Michael

Dennis: Solar panel
Dennis: Solar panel
Michael: Using mortar and pestal to grind cassava
Michael: Using mortar and pestal to grind cassava
Michael:Women making cassava products
Michael:Women making cassava products
Nafisa: Woman making reusable sanitary towels
Nafisa: Woman making reusable sanitary towels

Links:

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Organization

Project Leader

Angie Gust

PATHWAYS Leadership for Progress
Lilburn, GA Kenya

Where is this project located?

Map of Building leaders using education & local projects