Build a school from recycled materials for Maya

 
$21,877
$8,123
Raised
Remaining
Sep 17, 2014

Ten Years and Counting

Happy Birthday LWH
Happy Birthday LWH

On Saturday the 13th of September, Long Way Home officially passed a huge milestone...our tenth anniversary! While we look forward to sharing a full retrospective after this fiscal year, we did want to take a moment to thank all of you who have helped us to reach this point. As we look back on the previous ten years, we bear witness to some amazing highs and lows. Starting with a few thousand dollars from the raffle of a car, we have grown in size, capacity for impact, and scope of our mission. From the promise to help develop five acres into a community park, we have taken on the responsibility for a 17-building, K-12 vocational school campus that will train local youth in green building techniques. This transformation has happened gradually and organically as the Long Way Home team has become integrated into the community of San Juan Comalapa, earning a place in the 2009 census as one of four "families" that have moved here from outside the Department of Chimaltenango.

In addition to the close relationships we've developed with our employess, vendors, and neighbors, how else do we measure our success?

Education

In our third year hosting students but our first since being offcially recognized as Técnico Chixot by the Guatemalan Ministry of Education, we have expanded to 64 students and added the sixth grade. We have recently received permission to begin providing middle school and look forward to welcoming seventh graders in the 2015 academic year. We have completed construction of ten of the planned buildings and recently received a matching grant to construct the remaing four elemntary school classrooms. Construction on these began this summer and should be completed by the end of our dry season.

Employment

It is LWH's model to engage the local residents in our green construction techniques so that when we turn to a new project, this community will have the training to continue improving their own local infrastructure and providing affordable stoves, latrines, retaining walls and rainwater harvesting systems. According to a survey of local businesses conducted by a LWH intern and a US Peace Corps volunteer, we are the sixth largest employer of local residents in Comalapa. In a town where only 14% reported formal and permanent employment in the 2009 census, this matters. In the last decade, LWH has paid over US $162,000 in local salaries.

Environmnetal Stewardship

On May 23, 2014, Long Way Home staff, volunteers and students gathered to participate in the pounding of our 10,000th tired re-used in construction. Since then we have continued our upper retaining wall and begun three more classrooms, all built using car and truck tires. As of June 31st this year, we had used 313 tons of garbage in this school project alone. The number gets closer to 400 tons when you add in the tire homes and retaining walls we've built, both locally in this municipality and as far away as Boston, Massachusetts, and Bogota, Colombia. The future self-sufficiency of this school, the model we hope to replicate, requires that we prime the market for the products our students and the tangential construction company, Los Técnicos, have to offer.

As the rainy season goes out with a roar, we continue to push toward our mutual goal of providing an environmentally friendly alternative to the degrading cycle of poverty. Thank you for sharing this vision with us and for providing funds for us to invest in this muddy, hillside Mayan town. The project here lays the groundwork for similar rural education projects in other areas of the world with limited traditional resources. Together, we can be the change.

And speaking of transformation, if you are in the Boston area on October 25th please consider attending our annual Rubbish to Runway ReFashion show! Now in its fourth year, this event features a food, fun and high trashion. Use the link below to learn more and reserve your seats.

Our Kindergartners: Future Change Agents
Our Kindergartners: Future Change Agents
Tire Cistern
Tire Cistern

Links:

Jun 16, 2014

It's Raining Tires

We Read Together
We Read Together

Greetings from the Western Highlands of Guatemala!

Despite an early start to the wet season, it's been a very busy few months here at Técnico Chixot Education Center. Our students have turned the classrooms into colorful learning environments. Our third graders planted cala lilies and other beautiful greens in tires to make the outside spaces inviting too. Two of our students, second grader, Wesley, and sixth grader, Ingrid, represented our school in the municipal "We Read Together" event. In addition to our seven local teaching staff, we have recently been joined by a local teaching student who is fulfilling her practicum hours with our preschool class.

On Friday, May 23rd, Long Way Home (LWH) pounded it's 10,000th tire here at the school site! It was wonderful to have everyone, even the students and teachers (in traditional clothing), take a turn with the sledgehammer. Enjoy the video of the triumphant occasion using the link below.

In March, thanks to the generosity of alumni volunteer, Alex Sinclair, and his alma mater, Westfield State University, LWH was able to implement a modest micro-lending program. This new fund makes small, low-interest loans available to LWH's local Guatemalan staff. In this first process, we were able to award three loans and are pleased to report that one of the recipients has already almost paid the revolving fund back in full. To read more about this new effort, visit our blog, linked below.

We are also happy to share that we have nearly reached our goal for a matching grant offered through One Day's Wages. Cascadia Montessori deserves the lion's share of the credit, surpassing their original target and raising over $8,600 of the money we needed to raise. These funds will allow us to build three of the next primary school classrooms. We are returning to using rammed earth tires after completing the three primary school classrooms made from earthbags.  A huge thank you to everyone who participated in the ODW campaign, including the hosts and attendees of our Global Garage Sale on May 10th.

Also in May, we were pleased to host Teach-A-Man-To-Fish, a UK-based NGO that supports self-sufficient schools worldwide. Their yearly "School Enterprise Challenge" encourages schools to submit proposals for student-initiated businesses that can provide learning opportunities for budding entrepreneurs. Their workshop allowed us to show off our campus to several other educational institutions here in Guatemala.

As we move into the rainy season, work continues with little interruption. Interior finish work will occupy much of our time over the next months as we prepare for more grades and more students in the 2015 academic year. We are grateful for your continued support and invite you to like us on Facebook to keep up with all of our progress.

Third Grade Girls Planting Jade
Third Grade Girls Planting Jade
Crew on 10,000th Tire
Crew on 10,000th Tire

Links:

Mar 17, 2014

From Scrap to School

The halls of Tecnico Chixot
The halls of Tecnico Chixot

The following is a postcard from Lydia Sorensen, GlobalGiving's In-the-Field Representative in Guatemala, about her recent visit to Long Way Home.

According to the Pan American Health Organization, “[n]owhere in Guatemala is there a system for the final disposal of solid waste. In the urban areas it is estimated that 47 % of the population has the benefit of solid waste collection. The rest of the people burn, bury, or toss out their trash. In rural areas only 4% of the population has the benefit of trash collection services. The waste that is collected, in both urban and rural areas, is deposited in dumps with no further treatment.” (http://www.paho.org/english/sha/prflgut.htm) The statistics may be from 2001, but any visitor to Guatemala will tell you not much has changed since then. Trash lies strewn along side every road, stacked in every valley, thrown in every gutter.

Long Way Home is working to not only use some of what has been thrown away, but to change the way that Guatemalans think about waste, pollution, and conservation. They run a fully-accredited primary school in their green school (which is still under constructions and will someday also house a vocational school teaching teenagers sustainable construction) and supplement the national curriculum with lessons on recycling and composting. The lucky first through sixth graders who currently attend the school not only get a great education, they also get it in an amazing place.

The Tecnico Chixot Education Center sits on grassy hill overlooking the city of San Juan Comalapa. The colorful reliefs on the outside walls show Mayan scenes, flowers, and natural designs. Inside the classrooms (whose walls are constructed from tires) natural light shines through the glass bottles embedded in the ceilings, and a water filtration system provides clean drinking water. A retaining wall built using tires (so many were required that Long Way Home not only collected all the trash tires in the town but they actually repelled down into the dump to get more) holds up the school and supports the new construction. It’s a school that any student, and any community, would be proud to call their own.

Students learning
Students learning
Snack break!
Snack break!
Jan 22, 2014

Adding a New Grade for the New School Year!

2014 Teaching Staff and Directora
2014 Teaching Staff and Directora

 

Thursday, the 16th of January 2014, school began for 65 Comalapan children in Guatemala. An unusually cold morning gave way to direct sunlight on the patio of the Técnico Chixot Education Center, in which grades K-6 are now officially being hosted in the tire workshops that will eventually serve the vocational students. The kids sat in desks outside in the sunlight as the teachers, parents and Long Way Home staff members convened and began the introductory process. A giving of thanks by a teacher led into the Guatemalan national anthem (which was composed by a Comalapa native, Rafael Álvarez Ovalle, in 1896), and with heads bowed, the anthem was sung by parents, teachers and students alike. Polite rumbles and plumes of smoke by the not-so-distant Volcano Fuego heralded the start of the school year.

My name is Jesse Eells-Adams and I have only been living and working with Long Way Home for a week and a half. My contribution to the opening of the K-6 school is small in proportion to the men and women who have been living and aiding Long Way Home since its inception in 2004. This is a process of visionary people collaborating with equally talented locals committed to a brighter future in their hometown. A belief shared by the members of Long Way Home is that development is had by hard work at a grassroots level. The resources invested in this single location to provide education to a handful of locals indicates the magnitude of help required to realize the system needed to change current education and waste management systems.


Daunting as it is to create access to natural rights and resources in impoverished nations such as Guatemala, every little victory breeds more hope. It is admittedly easy to become cynical about a country that is endlessly imperiled with organized crime and corruption. However, one of the most striking realizations I’ve had since my stay in rural Guatemala is how beautiful and friendly these locals are, the direct descendants from the ancient Mayan civilization, who still practice Mayan traditions and speak Spanish as a second language after their native Kaqchikel.


It is the contrast of what you read and hear versus what you experience when you work next to one of the Guatemalan staff, or help deliver drinking water to the local Mayan shop owner in a vase meant to be balanced on your head, that made the inaugural school day today so impactful for me. Seeing the kids ready to learn, playful, easily distracted and just being absolutely normal and good made every single cold bucket bath and antibiotic pill pay off tenfold.

Tour of School Property for Parents and Students
Tour of School Property for Parents and Students
Third Grade Student Ready to Learn
Third Grade Student Ready to Learn
Nancy Leading 2nd Graders in a Song
Nancy Leading 2nd Graders in a Song
Two Returning Students and a New Preschooler
Two Returning Students and a New Preschooler

Links:

Oct 21, 2013

Embarking on a New Phase

Yovani
Yovani's Chair

Long Way Home is pleased to announce that we have been granted permission to open a new school by the Guatemalan Ministry of Education!  After several months of hard work to get the appropriate stamps from the health center, the Department of the Environment and other official seals of approval, we submitted a 400+ page application and, as of this week, Centro Educativo Técnico Chixot is official!  Lars Battle, LWH Community Development Liaison, led the charge and performed the majority of the work to make this possible.  We'd also like to extend our gratitude to our neighbor Feliciano Peren, our local education authority Edgar Simon Icú and our regional education authority Rómulo Xicay Ajuchan for their guidance and hard work during this process.  We will retain all of our local teachers in the 2014 academic year and hope to add at least one more local teacher, hire a new local director and add the sixth grade.  We are thrilled to have achieved this milestone and are now one step closer to having a self-sufficient school in San Juan Comalapa, Guatemala!

The 2013 school year ended this month and boy, did our students go out with a bang!  October 1st was Children's Day in Guatemala.  Our students celebrated by participating in a trash art competition.  Students from all grade levels crafted boats, picture frames, aluminum cars and other awesome objects from "waste" materials they found in their homes.  The winner, 5th grader Yovani, made a chair out of 75 plastic bottles.  Although a bit small, it can hold an adult's weight and is super durable.  On the last day of school, the 4th and 5th graders hosted an exhibition of all the things they'd made from trash in their art class.  Toothbrush holders, chip bag wallets and egg baskets were just some of the awesome crafts the kiddos displayed.

In construction news, we are spending the next few months putting the finishing touches on our three earthbag primary school classrooms.  As the rainy season winds down, earthen finish work speeds up.  Our finishes are drying more swiftly and we don't have to spend nearly so much time tarping the buildings to protect them from late afternoon deluges.  As usual, we are crafting earthen art to adorn the walls of the classrooms.  For our first dome, we are featuring forest animals and vegetations.  So far we have a jaguar, a deer, a family of owls and several trees.  We are thinking of doing an ocean theme for the second dome.  As our finishing materials can be easily molded into most any form, we love to take advantage of the opportunity to add art where ever we can.

We sincerely appreciate your continued support of our school project.  Without generous donations of time and money, we would not be celebrating the end of a successful second school year and the beginning of a whole new school experience for the youth in our rural, indigenous town.  A million times thank you!

Egg Basket
Egg Basket
Deer in the Forest
Deer in the Forest
Local Students Volunteer for a Day
Local Students Volunteer for a Day

Links:

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating or by subscribing to this project's RSS feed.

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
  • $50
  • $175
  • $10
    each month
  • $50
    each month
  • $175
    each month
  • $
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Organization

Project Leader

Mateo Paneitz

Executive Director
Georgetown, MA United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Build a school from recycled materials for Maya