Treating patients at our AZ Wildlife Hospital

 
$17,662
$7,338
Raised
Remaining
Edwina the green tree snake
Edwina the green tree snake

Age: Juvenile        Sex: Unknown       Weight: 3gms

Found: At a home in Buderim, on the Sunshine Coast QLD with duct tape stuck to her body.

Transported to: The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by a concerned member of the public.

Veterinary Assessment: Dr Amber anaesthetised tiny, little Edwina on arrival so she could complete a full assessment of the snake's condition. After a thorough examination Dr Amber confirmed that the duct tape stuck to Edwina's skin had caused minor scale damage but she was otherwise in good health.

Treatment: Dr Amber carefully removed the duct tape from Edwina's little body using a chemical free adhesive remover. This reduced any further damage caused to her scales. Edwina was then placed in a heated terrarium in the reptiles’ intensive care unit for recovery.

Future: Edwina will remain under close observation in the reptiles ICU until she sheds her skin. This is to ensure she has completely recovered from her injuries before being released back into the wild.

AZWH Fact: The green tree snake happily spends most of its time in trees and shrubs as their long slender body allows them to be extremely agile climbers. While most are green in colour they can also be brown or black; most possessing a yellow throat.

Edwina the green tree snake.
Edwina the green tree snake.

Links:

The Paddling Team of Whistling Ducklings
The Paddling Team of Whistling Ducklings

Age: Juvenile                          Sex: Unknown                 Weight: 18gms

Found: All alone without their parents on a property in Beerwah, QLD. It was not known how they came to be separated.

Transported to: The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by a kind member of the public.

Veterinary Assessment: Each individual duckling was assessed by Dr Amber to ensure they were all in good health. Fortunately Dr Amber found that all seven ducklings showed no signs of physical trauma and was satisfied they were in good condition.

Treatment: Fortunately none of the seven ducklings required treatment and were placed inside a heated humidicrib in the small mammals ICU under close observation.

Future: The seven ducklings were all kept together and transferred to a carer the same day. In care they will interact with other orphaned ducklings until they are ready for release. This is usually after three months when all their flight feathers have grown.

AZWH Fact: The wandering whistling duck enjoys the water, usually inhabiting deep lagoons, dams and flooded grasslands. They swim and dive through the water with ease and are not usually found far from the shore.

The Paddling Team of Whistling Ducklings.
The Paddling Team of Whistling Ducklings.

Links:

Pixies the Pink-Tongued Skinks
Pixies the Pink-Tongued Skinks

The Pixies the Pink-Tongued Skinks

Age: Juvenile  Sex: Unknown   Weight: 2 gms each

Found: On a road in Maleny after their mum was run over by a car. The weight of the car caused the babies to be ejected from her abdomen.

Transported to: The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by a member of the public that rescued them off the road.

Veterinary Assessment: Sadly the mother skink didnt survive however Dr Claude was on duty to immediately check over the remaining four babies. One was very weak and passed away a short-time later but the other three were well developed and strong despite being premature.

Treatment: Dr Claude administered each baby skink with fluids for hydration and placed them in a heated terrarium in the reptiles intensive care unit.

Future: Pink-tongued skinks are independent from the moment they are born. Therefore the three remaining baby skinks were returned to bushland in Maleny the very same day. Instinctively they will start fending for themselves and feed on slugs, snails and worms.

AZWH Fact: Pink-tongued skinks are a useful reptile in a garden or backyard due to their preferred diet of snails and slugs. Unfortunately as a result of living in suburban areas they are commonly under threat by dogs, cats and cars.

Pixies
Pixies
Norbert the Wedge-tailed eagle
Norbert the Wedge-tailed eagle
Age: Adult  Sex: Unknown  Weight: 3.4kgs
Found: Walking around on the ground near bushland in Narangba and unable to fly.
Transported to: The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by a member of the public. It took four people to safely catch and contain the large bird.
Veterinary Assessment: Norbert was bright and alert on arrival to the hospital. Although he was unable to fly his walking and running ability was good. He was anaesthetised for assessment and sadly Dr Claude found a gunshot wound in his right wing. The gun pellet not only left a large, open wound and extensive bruising but an x-ray also revealed a fracture to his ulna bone.
Treatment: Dr Claude flushed the wound to clean out debris and pellet fragments. The wound was covered over and the entire wing was also bandaged
to keep it still. Norbert was given fluids, antibiotics to fight infection and pain relief medication.
Future: Norbert is presently in the birds ICU at the Wildlife Hospital in a large enclosure where he will remain until his injuries heal. Once his fracture has
healed he will be transferred to a larger aviary facility at the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary on the Gold Coast where he will have the opportunity to fly
and learn to use his wing again. Once he gains full use he will be released back into the wild.
AZWH Fact: Wedge-tailed eagles are the largest bird of prey in Australia and are a protected native animal. Someone caught shooting them could be faced with a $40,000 fine and a jail term
Betty Boo the koala
Betty Boo the koala

Betty Boo the Koala

Age: 18 months Sex: Female Weight: 3.41kgs

Found: In the middle of a highway by a truck driver near Marlborough, QLD. It was suspected that she had been caught in a nearby bushfire.

Transported to: By the truck driver to a vet clinic. The clinic then had her transferred to AZWH by another amazing member of the public that made the seven hour trip down!

Veterinary Assessment: Betty Boo was seen by Dr Bec who found a very nervous little girl with singed fur and a burnt nose. After she was anesthetised for examination, Dr Bec could also see that the pads of
her feet were partly burnt and she was missing some claws.

Treatment: Dr Bec cleaned the burns thoroughly with saline solution and applied a sterile gauze bandage to the affected paws. Betty Boo was given strong pain relief, antibiotics to fight against
infection and fluids.

Future: The little koala has since been recovering in the mammals ICU. She is presently having antibacterial ointment applied to her burns on a daily basis and needs some assistance with eating
due to the injuries on her paws. When she has completely healed Betty Boo will be transferred back to the Marlborough region and placed in bushland, unaffected by fire and safely away from other risks.

AZWH Fact: Wildlife can become seriously injured or displaced during bushfires. If you come across a distressed animal call the wildlife emergency hotline in your area.

Links:

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Project Leader

Michelle Burgum

Beerwah, Queensland Australia

Where is this project located?

Map of Treating patients at our AZ Wildlife Hospital