Updates from Japan Relief Projects

 
$10+ million
Over 50,000
in 111
Dec 15, 2014

December Global Giving Report

Helping out at the New Rice Center in Yamamoto-cho
Helping out at the New Rice Center in Yamamoto-cho

Thank you very much for your continued generous support.

 

In October HOT volunteers participated in a Day of Service in Tokyo by exhibiting photographs of HOT volunteer projects in Tohoku and the many wonderful people in Tohoku HOT volunteers have been able to support with your generous donations.  Through this exhibition, we were able to share the stories of the people of Tohoku and the positive impact volunteers can have on those still trying to rebuild their lives after the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami.  It also encouraged new volunteers to join our Tohoku projects.

 

There continue to be labor shortages in certain parts of Tohoku that are making it very hard for local farmers to rebuild their lives, run their farms and grow their businesses as the limited number of available workers are deployed on large scale infrastructure and other construction projects. They and their families simply cannot do all the hard labor-intensive work themselves.  They need the continued support of volunteers. With your generous contributions, HOT volunteers have been able to continue to support a local farmer, Saito-san, and the New Rice Center in Yamamoto-cho.  The New Rice Center gives rice farmers in the Yamamoto-cho area a place to store equipment and supplies and to work, get together and share information. It also contains new rice thrashing equipment that local farmers can use when harvesting rice and packaging the harvested rice for the market.

 

In October, 15 HOT volunteers, including teenagers who live in a children’s home in the Tokyo area, helped Saito-san clear fields after harvesting vegetables.  They also enjoyed providing Saito-san and his wife with a chance to relax for a little bit by preparing a BBQ using his locally-grown vegetables. In November, 15 HOT volunteers, including teenagers from the children’s home, helped the New Rice Center by attacking a mountain of rice chaff, the protective casings separated from rice grains during the thrashing process.  The rice chaff has to be manually bagged so that it can be taken away and used as fertilizer.  It is hard to imagine how long it would take local farmers to bag and remove all of the rice chaff without the support of volunteers.   

 

Going forward, we will continue to organize more volunteer trips to further support the New Rice Center and Saito-san, his wife and others in Tohoku as they work hard to further rebuild their lives.  We also are coordinating a job shadowing program with Saito-san and other local Tohoku farmers for youths who must leave the children’s home when they turn 18.  This will connect local Tohoku farmers who are looking for young people to work with in rebuilding the local agricultural economy and youths who lack family and other support and who are looking for jobs.

 

In November, 15 HOT volunteers helped with the hotate matsuri (scallop festival) in Ogatsu by running the scallop booth which gave festival attendees the chance to enjoy grilled fresh oysters.  Prior to the earthquake and tsunami, the hotate matsuri was a very popular annual event.  While so much of Ogatsu has yet to be reconstructed and while so many former residents are still waiting to return to their beloved hometown, it was so encouraging to see so many smiling faces in Ogatsu for the day to enjoy local fresh scallops.  Thank you for making this possible.

 

Going forward and so long as people are still living in temporary housing, we also will continue to hold cafes and events at temporary housing sites in Tohoku.  And we will travel to Ogatsu to help maintain the community house (which was built with the help of your generous donations), to clean local beaches so that people from the greater Sendai area will continue to visit the area and thereby support the local economy and to participate in special events like the hotate matsuri to encourage those who are still waiting to resume their lives in Ogatsu and the surrounding communities.

 

None of this would be possible without your generous support. Thank you in advance for your continued support and for touching the hearts and souls of so many people in Tohoku.  

Helping at the Scallop Festival in Ogatsu
Helping at the Scallop Festival in Ogatsu
Helping at the Scallop Festival in Ogatsu
Helping at the Scallop Festival in Ogatsu
With Saito-san at New Rice Center in Yamamoto-cho
With Saito-san at New Rice Center in Yamamoto-cho
With Saito-san at New Rice Center in Yamamoto-cho
With Saito-san at New Rice Center in Yamamoto-cho
Bagging rice husk at the New Rice Center
Bagging rice husk at the New Rice Center
Dec 2, 2014

Supporting Sustainable Business Continuity Planning Training in Japanese NGOs

BCP in-house lecture
BCP in-house lecture

International Medical Corps, in partnership with Tokio Marine & Nichido Risk Consulting Co., Ltd., is continuing to provide training in Business Continuity Planning (BCP) to Japanese NGOs in the form of in-house lectures and tabletop exercises to build their organizational capacity to respond to disasters quickly and efficiently. NGOs requesting training by International Medical Corps include: Care International Japan; ChildFund Japan; Japan Association for Refugees (JAR); Japan International Volunteer Center (JVC); Plan Japan; Save the Children Japan (SCJ); Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA); Shapla Neer. Trainings will all take place between October and December 2014.

BCP In-House Lecture for Save the Children Japan

On October 10, 2014, International Medical Corps and Tokio Marine provided 17 key staff members of Save the Children Japan (SCJ) with a BCP in-house lecture. SCJ was established in 1986 with a focus on child protection, disaster risk reduction and creating child-friendly communities in Japan. SCP also provides emergency humanitarian assistance, health, nutrition, and educational support, mainly in countries in Asia and Africa.

Takako Isoda, SCJ’s Administrative Manager, said, “We had set up a risk management working group within the organization to map out the various risks faced by our organization, but we had no idea how to lay out a plan to deal with so many kinds of risk. A number of us attended International Medical Corps’ BCP workshop last year and learned how to think about risk and how to craft a basic BCP. Using what we learned at that workshop, we spent half a year drafting SCJ’s BCP. Now that we finally had a complete draft, we were wondering how to best share its contents with our staff and make the draft more practical and concrete. It was with perfect timing that we received the offer from International Medical Corps for an in-house BCP lecture and tabletop exercise.

“We had the members of our risk management working group, the director-general, and all department heads and managers attend the BCP in-house lecture. The lecture focused on the basics of BCP thinking and really helped our key staff understand the importance of BCP. With the facilitation of a professional risk consultant, we also shared our newly-drafted BCP with everyone in the room. Our senior management commented afterwards that they felt they better understood what was in our BCP and that it was up to all of us to keep working on the BCP draft and make it a living document for the organization. We are all looking forward to the BCP tabletop simulation exercise in December, which will help us have a better sense of what works in the BCP and what needs to be improved.”

Emergency Scenario Tabletop Exercise for SVA

On November 12, 2014, International Medical Corps and Tokio Marine organized an emergency scenario tabletop exercise for Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA). SVA is a Japanese NGO founded in 1981 and dedicated to providing educational support and emergency relief activities in countries including Thailand, Laos, Myanmar, the Philippines and Afghanistan. SVA has also carried out multiple relief activities in the aftermath of flood and typhoon disasters in Japan.

Because of its role as an emergency response organization, SVA had been conducting annual reviews of its emergency supplies and emergency guidelines. This simulation was the very first opportunity for the SVA staff to test their emergency guidelines. 26 out of 28 staff members at SVA’s Tokyo headquarters, including full-time and contract-based personnel, participated in the exercise. After Tokio Marine’s Kenichi Hamazaki explained the general flow of the day’s exercise, the staff returned to their desks as part of their “normal routine.” The simulation commenced a few minutes later with an earthquake (according to the scenario) that “struck” the building. For the duration of the simulation, the staff checked the whereabouts and safety of staff members, checked their emergency supplies, prioritized workload by department for the next few days after the disaster, and otherwise followed their emergency protocol. After the simulation, staff members split up into their respective departments and discussed the lessons they learned during the exercise and next steps forward.

Some comments from participants included:

  • “I feel safer now that I know better how to act if a disaster should strike the office. We should do this kind of simulation activity at least once a year.”
  • “The exercise really made me realize the gravity of a potential disaster. It also gave me a chance to sit down with my family and decide how we’d reach one another in the event of an emergency.”
  • “It was useful for each department to reflect on the exercise. It’s important to share our differing priorities and for all of us to work together to prepare what’s needed.”
  • “Next time we should also include part-time staff and interns in the simulation exercise.”

Mariko Kimura, manager of SVA’s emergency response and preparation, commented, “Since almost all the staff members of SVA took part in this exercise, we were able to look at our emergency guidelines from many different perspectives and see that there are still many issues that we need to deal with (e.g., things we still need to prepare, steps that need to be more clearly outlined, etc.). Additionally, it was very helpful to learn that each department has different needs during and after a disaster. Having the consultant with us to facilitate both the simulation exercise and the follow-up discussion added a healthy dose of tension for the staff and made us all focus all the more on the day’s activities. Using the lessons we learned during this exercise and the advice we received from the consultant, we will be even better prepared to deal with any emergency.  ”

Explanation of the flow of the simulation exercise
Explanation of the flow of the simulation exercise
Seeking protection during earthquake simulation
Seeking protection during earthquake simulation
Staff check the emergency supplies
Staff check the emergency supplies
Sharing lessons learned
Sharing lessons learned
Nov 25, 2014

Supporting victims living in transitional shelters

Company employees listening to victims
Company employees listening to victims

In the aftermath of the earthquake, the city of Ishinomaki had to construct as many as 7,122 row-house-style transitional shelter units to house the disaster victims. The complex is the largest of its kind among all the municipalities that were affected by the disaster.

Now, forty three months down the line, many people still have no other options than to live in these basic dwellings. Even many elderly locals have to remain in these transitional shelters, and some are growing impatient to move out as they suffer from loneliness and often do not enjoy the comfort they use to have in their former homes.

Ishinomaki aims at setting up 4,000 disaster public housing units so that victims may move from temporary shelters to homes where they can live without anxiety. However, soring labor costs and material prices are delaying the construction work, and residents of the temporary shelters fear that their quality of life will not improve any time soon.

In an effort to bring relief to victims living in the complex, JEN organizes occasional networking events within the community. These events are much appreciated as they bring a sense solidarity and mutual support and understanding among the participants. A participant said “working in a group and talking with neighbors over lunch we cooked together provided me with an opportunity to become aware and learn about things that we usually take for granted.”

 

Let’s Create Our Dream Playground!

On August 24 and September 7, JEN held a workshop entitled “Let’s Create Our Dream Playground!” in cooperation with UNIQLO Dream Wall project.

JEN organized the workshop to seek ideas for the construction of a playground that will be built on the Kamikama Fureai Square located in western Ishinomaki city. A total of about 100 people, including many children, attended the workshop, creating a lively atmosphere.

Workshop participants firstly had a good look at the site. They observed how large it is, where it is located, and what its surroundings are. They then had the opportunity to give their input on what they would like to have in their “Dream Playground”. The children had a lot of fun doing so. Their opinions on the layout of the playground, the color of the equipment, how to play with the equipment and so on were put together into plans presented to architect Masayoshi Takeuchi. Mr. Takeuchi will then integrate these plans into his own architectural plan, which will take concrete shape next spring.

By taking their input into consideration, the workshop brought local residents a sense of ownership in the playground project. JEN is committed to continuing these activities that aim to create an environment where children really want to play so that they may be able to realize a town where they can live an easier life and hope to live for a long time.

 

Kadonowaki Junior High Student Council Wins Volunteer Spirit Award for its Efforts on "Spreading Flowerbeds through Human Connections"

The 18th Volunteer Spirit Award was awarded to the student council of the Ishinomaki Municipal Kadonowaki Junior High School.

The award aims to develop volunteerism among junior-high-school and high-school students by encouraging the conduction of volunteer activities, promoting exchanges with other students, and letting other students know more about volunteer activities.

The criteria for deciding the winner of the award are: contribution to the community, creativity, ability to make a plan and execute it, leadership, and the activity’s educational value.

Kadonowaki Junior High School also invited the students of the Ishinomaki Municipal Kadonowaki Elementary School and the Omachi Elementary School to join their project. The school districts where these two elementary schools are located were severely hit by the tsunami, particularly the Kadonowaki Elementary School which was burnt down. The tsunami and ensuing fires have left many districts completely changed. One of these districts, Minimicho, looked like “a deserted city” according to some students who used to live there. To rejuvenate the area, the students came up with this idea: “We hope to make a flowerbed in our inflicted school’s playground, and make people happy with flowers of many different colors”. The damage was so bad at Kadonowaki Elementary School that many people around the country came to see this particular site to get a grasp of the devastation of the disaster.

The teachers of the school consulted with the city board of education to realize the students’ idea, but they were told it was difficult to set up a flowerbed within the school’s premises because the reconstruction plan of the school had yet to be made.

JEN helped “these students of Ishinomaki, the most affected city by the disaster, set up their initiative aimed at cheering up their communities.” JEN’s help consisted of renting a vacant plot of land located at a short distance behind the school. It removed the rubbles, weeded the plot and cleared the litter to prepare the soil for flowers.

In November 2012, many local people and volunteers cooperated with the students in making a flowerbed and planting tulip bulbs. A surprising number of flowers imbued with the students’ hope bloomed the next spring. In the autumn of 2013, the flowerbed was taken charged by the first graders from the second graders who first came up with the idea. In this manner, the activity will be perpetuated.

The Volunteer Spirit Award was awarded to the students for their efforts to revitalize their communities. No doubt, Ishinomaki’s future leaders on whom the city’s revitalization relies on are growing. JEN continues to support these future leaders.

Networking and support party
Networking and support party
Children giving a presentation of their plan
Children giving a presentation of their plan
Burnt Kadonowaki Elementry School
Burnt Kadonowaki Elementry School
Flowers blooming in all their beauty
Flowers blooming in all their beauty
Second graders and volunteers
Second graders and volunteers

Links:

Nov 13, 2014

Violin Concerts at Temporary Housing Complexes

The local musicians played the ocarina (4 Oct
The local musicians played the ocarina (4 Oct '04)

AAR Japan organises a variety of events for temporary housing residents, who have been living in a dire situation ever since the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, for the purpose of giving joy and encouragement to, and revitalising communities.

As one of such efforts, we organized violin and ocarina concerts at a temporary housing complex and community hall in Minamisoma City, Fukushima Prefecture and Watari Town, Miyagi Prefecture on 4th and 5th of October, 2014. The temporary housing complex in Minamisoma City accommodates evacuees from Odaka-Ku near Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Their home was not only destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami, but also contaminated by radiation from the power plant, which prohibits the evacuees from returning to their homes. Watari Town is located in the coastal area in the south of Miyagi Prefecture and had a vibrant town life with a prospering fishing industry and a popular beautiful beach before the disaster.

On this occasion, we invited Ms Mitoko Sato, a Japanese violinist active in France who has been playing the violin in the disaster-stricken areas, to play in the temporary housing communities. ”I live off music”, she says and explains that “the only way that I can help the disaster survivors is through music”. At the concerts, she collaborated with a group of local ocarina musicians from Soma City, Fukushima Prefecture, upon her request.

The concert started off with ocarina performance. The local musicians played Japanese popular songs, folk songs, and local traditional songs. The warm timbre of ocarina brought smiles to the residents of temporary housing complexes. Violin performance of classic music, which followed the ocarina performance, fascinated the audience, as well. The highlight of the concert was the joint performance of ocarina and violin. They played chorus music, which everyone knows from his/her school days, as well as Japanese National Television’s rooters’ song, “Hana wa Saku (Flowers bloom)”  “Hana ha Saku” was performed alongside sign language. The harmony of the violin and ocarina was truly beautiful. The audience brought back smiles to home after the concerts.

Three years and eight months after the disaster, some progress toward rehabilitation can be recognised in terms of construction of private housing and public permanent housing for the evacuees. However, approximately 188,000 people still live in temporary housing complexes in three prefectures affected by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. In order to support these evacuees and survivors, AAR Japan is determined to continue our assistance activities in disaster-stricken areas.

"Hana wa Saku" was performed along sign language
"Hana wa Saku" was performed along sign language
The violinist Ms Mitoko Sato
The violinist Ms Mitoko Sato
Joint performance of violin and ocarina
Joint performance of violin and ocarina
Nov 6, 2014

Three-and-a-half years since the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

September 11 marked the three-and-a-half year anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Progress has been made in affected areas, where debris has been removed, infrastructure has been restored, and those in temporary housing have begun moving into more permanent housing solutions. Currently there are 89,000 people still living in prefabricated temporary housing units. Employment, education and prospect for the future of the city are all important factors to consider when choosing a location to make a fresh start. Leaving the sense community created in the temporary housing community and creating new connections at the next location can be a source of anxiety that follows as well. Creating your own "home base" - deciding on your location of residence and place of employment - plays a critical role in the shaping of a stable and safe lifestyle. However, it is clear that for the survivors who experienced invaluable loss, the decision is not an easy one to make. Even so, the people of Tohoku with their perseverance and strength are living with the appreciation that they are alive, and are working towards challenges with a positive attitude without losing hope.

It's mainly these types of people who are the clientele of MakiBiz. "I want to rebuild my shop to create a space where people in the community can gather," "I want to create an industry that people in this city can be a part of, and create employment opportunities," "I want to revive my business not only for myself, but also for the people that have supported and cheered me on" – these are the types of statements that we hear from our clients over and over again. MakiBiz is working to respond to each individual's consultations by creating a business support team to work with our clients.

Three-and-a-half years seem long and short. There are the residents in the affected communities who have kept trekking forward, and there are people who are working to support the recovery of these communities. However the recovery of the region is not moving as much as the general public assumes. What is required to further the recovery? In the past three-and-a-half years, those in the community have been desperately running forward, but in current circumstances where things have gradually began to calm down, the time has come to truly face the issue of what the future of Tohoku will be as we move forward. MakiBiz will continue to walk along with the residents of Tohoku, supporting them in the best way possible.

 

UPDATES

MakiBiz RFP Program Overview

With the completion of the Oikawa Denki office space, only 2 out of the 9 MakiBiz RFP Program's projects remain to be completed - Konpiramaru and Tamiko Abe. These two projects are planned to be completed in November. Learn more about each project through their project links on the Open Architecture Network.

MakiBiz Client Intake

MakiBiz has supported 190 business owners since it opened its office. Information about our clients, along with other MakiBiz updates can be found

"Dream Map" Workshop Held at Ishinomaki NOTE

MakiBiz helped to coordinate "Dream Map," a popular dream visualization workshop in Japan at Ishinomaki NOTE, an organization that supports young adults with employment support. The event consists of visualizing what you'd like to become or what you'd like to accomplish in the future, and using pictures and words to express this on one sheet of paper in a six-hour time frame. Their fuzzy dreams gradually take a clearer shape through the process of self-analysis and in speaking with other participants, and it helps participants to take action in achieving them. We hope that this process empowered participants in taking a step forward to achieve their dreams!

MakiBiz Business Support

Much progress has been made with our business support clients! Kikuzakari Sake Brewery, who holds a 140-year history, has started fundraising through a micro-financing service to buy all required equipment that will replace ones that they lost for the tsunami! And two ship-building companies in Ogatsu have merged into one, and are working towards constructing a new factory. Moving forward, we will likely be aiding many businesses in reaching funds necessary to rebuild. MakiBiz will strengthen its support structure, and continue to aid small businesses with the support they need!

 

JOB OPPORTUNITIES AND PROGRAM NEEDS

Business Coordinator
Fundraiser

Tesuki Washi Ushiogami
Tesuki Washi Ushiogami
Tamiko Abe
Tamiko Abe
Oikawa Denki
Oikawa Denki
"Dream Map" Workshop
"Dream Map" Workshop
Kikuzakari Sake Brewery
Kikuzakari Sake Brewery

Links:

Oct 29, 2014

Updates on projects continuing in Japan!

summer camp, photo courtesy of Academy Camp
summer camp, photo courtesy of Academy Camp

A busy summer has come and gone for our various partner projects working in the field in Japan. Thank you for your continuous support of the relief efforts being done in Japan for the earthquake and tsunami victims! Through your support, various projects are able to help benefit the livelihoods of those affected by the disaster.

Parents were concerned about allowing their children to play outside because of the health risks of radioactivity that the earthquake may have caused, but Academy Camp has been a great outlet for children to engage in outdoor activities. During the summer, Academy Camp held camps for children living in Fukushima for them to enjoy the outdoors in areas with lower radiation levels. The children participants as well as the volunteers for the camps really enjoyed the wonderful experience that the camp provided because it was an experience that was full of kindness, warmth and bright smiles. Academy Camp also founded the first dragon boat team in Fukushima. The paddle boat practices are a great opportunity for the children to get mental and physical exercise as well as a time for the parents to be a part of their children’s new activity.

Architecture for Humanity continues to help local shops and businesses to recover and re-open to build a financial future for the communities affected by the earthquake and tsunami. In partnership with the MakiBiz RFP Program, Architecture for Humanity commenced their “Tamiko Abe” project that is to help a local aqua-farmer build a building for her to conduct her business. They recently held a Japanese ground-breaking ritual called Jichinsai for the new site, a ceremony that is held before beginning the construction of a building to pray for a safe construction.

There are many still living in temporary housing in Japan, but the Association for Aid and Relief, Japan (AAR Japan) has been holding events to improve the stress and mental health of those living in these homes. They have conducted aromatherapy classes, where many of the elderly were able to relax through botanical aromas, and also held fun soap making class where the participants got to interact with the others living in the homes. Because many living in the temporary housing are afraid that such events will go away and that those affected by the disaster will be forgotten, AAR Japan will do what they can to continue to hold these events to remind these people that they will not be left behind.

Thanks again for your continued support for those impacted by the Japan earthquake and tsunami. Your generous donations contribute to the amazing work that is being done by many of our partner organizations!

Dragon boating, photo courtesy of Academy Camp
Dragon boating, photo courtesy of Academy Camp
photo courtesy of Architecture for Humanity
photo courtesy of Architecture for Humanity
soap making class, photo courtesy of AAR Japan
soap making class, photo courtesy of AAR Japan
Oct 21, 2014

Ups and Downs, But Highly Appreciative of Help

Past young bike-freaks gathered to help Isatomae
Past young bike-freaks gathered to help Isatomae

People at the Isatomae Redevelopment Archade (Fukko Shotengai, FS) still feel a lot of uncertainty and anxiety. They are working on diverse issues to rebuild their community. So far, they started seeing a small portion of land raised to half a level of the original plan, where the FS shops will move temporarily while the land level of the shop’s permanent location will be raised. Shops will move to the half-raised temporary place in 2015, precisely when not yet known. It was surprising for them, since the temporary place will be below the land level of main road and the permanent shop place when the rest of the land is raised to the level originally planned. But at least, the plan is advancing relative to the past. It was a good news.

Then another surprise came. The government passed a law that the present government-funded temporary shops have to be continuously used for the next five years. This law generated two serious concerns. One is that the present shops have to be closed and moved to the temporary location, meaning that they have to stop operating their business completely for two months. This law was passed, assuming that shops are moving from a present temporary location to a permanent one. The Isatomae’s situation is to move from the present temporary location to another temporary one and then finally to a permanent place. Does this mean that they have to move present temporary shops and facilities twice? Concern is that moving old shop buildings is as expensive as building new ones. They are now negotiating with the government whether they can build new shops in the permanent place while they use old shop materials in a newly moving temporary place. If moving old shops costs the same or more than building new ones, then it is better to build new ones. But does the law allow this to happen since all of two moves will take place within five years? Amid their worries, one good story is that they are going to use the temporary shop-tent which was built by donations from the Refugee International Japan, the Japan Forest Biomas Network, and the GlobalGiving mediated through the DSIA.  They may have to operate their business in the tent for two months when old shops will be dismantled and rebuild in the temporary place and to store their equipment and facilities for quite a long time. The FS is highly appreciative of the existence of the tent, which helps to make their transition much smoother.  This means that, thanks to your kind heart, understanding and donation, we are still helping them to rebuild their community.

The other problem could be much tougher than the first one. It could become quite a demotivating factor for people in the FS since they have been working to build their new shops with dream for almost two years. The FS very much decided to establish an Isatomae Redevelopment Company which will own new buildings and charge rents to tenants, rather than to establish an association. A company form enables the FS to borrow money from banks and even allow outside tenants to come in when vacancies in shops occur. This makes the company operation securer. However, despite their two-year discussions, the Minami-sanriku Township suddenly informed them that it will establish a company and provide them a building. The plan was informed suddenly as a surprise. Now, they have to engage in negotiation all over again despite a well-thought plan by the FS. This could be quite a tough negotiation and be demotivating.

Separate from these problems, the FS is organizing many events as usual. On October 20, they have a group of past young bike-freaks to bring in about 100 unusually decorated cars (see pictures). They wanted to show their willingness to contribute to society. The FS is also planning to have an exhibition of their soccer team flags in the Sendai Stadium when a soccer game will be held there, hoping to find willing partners to contribute to the FS. They are working very hard to get events organized and planned, so that they can bring in customers to the FS. But even on this point, they worry that the lack of clear planning when they can move to the temporary as well as the permanent places makes it quite difficult to plan and organize events, which are a very important source of bringing in customers.

When they start seeing the raised temporary place to move in, it gave them a sense that they start seeing a small light at the end of a long and dark tunnel, moving one step closer to their dream. But then, new problems, one of which may even make their two-year efforts meaningless, arose. They are engaging in negotiations, very much hoping that they can follow their original plan. Given this uncertainty now three years after the disaster, they look much more tired than before. But they are extremely appreciative of the tent-shop, established with the help of the DSIA, the GlobalGiving, the Refugee International Japan, and the Japan Forest Biomas Network. 

Past young bike-freaks to help Isatomae
Past young bike-freaks to help Isatomae
Donated tent to be used again by Isatomae shops
Donated tent to be used again by Isatomae shops

Links:

Sep 25, 2014

Updates on AMDA International Scholarship Program

Dear Global Giving Supporters,

AMDA has been supporting to the high school students living in Tohoku region, where the number of lives has been impacted by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011. AMDA International Scholarship Program has started in March 2011 and 274 students of 8 schools have received the scholarship in the past 3 years. Each student receives 15,000yen (about 147USD) per month until she/he graduates high school.

We are happy to announce that 7 students newly joined our scholarship program as recipients during this reporting period (July-September 2014). 5 students are in the 3rd grade and 2 are in the 2nd grade of a high school in Otsuchi town, Miyagi prefecture.

Thanks to the warm support from our donors, we are able to continue to support high school students in Tohoku Region.

Please click on the attached file to get the report in PDF. 

We thank you for your continued support.


Attachments:

The north coast of Japan was hit by a horrible tsunami after an 9.0 magnitude earthquake that occurred 80 miles offshore. The largest earthquake to strike Japan on record, millions of people have been affected by this massive disaster.

Through our network of project partners, who pass GlobalGiving's rigorous due diligence process, issues as diverse as immediate relief and animal safety are being addressed. The Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Relief Fund is composed of a subset of the projects featured on this page as well as other Japanese NGOs. To see updates on how the funds have been used please see the Fund Reports Tab. Alternatively, you may choose to support the efforts of a specific organization.

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