Haiti Earthquake Relief

Updates from Projects On the Ground

These updates have been posted by project leaders on the ground in Haiti responding to the deadly earthquake. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them, therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Jason Graber on July 10, 2014

International Medical Corps Continues to Fight Cholera in Haiti

Community outreach team member and local resident
Community outreach team member and local resident

International Medical Corps was on the ground in Haiti 22 hours after the devastating January 2010 7.0 earthquake that took over 200,000 lives and displaced hundreds of thousands more. Tragically, the earthquake was not the only disaster to strike Haiti that year. In late October 2010, cholera broke out in Artibonite, a rural region north of Port-au-Prince.  International Medical Corps was one of the very first organizations to respond, and had medical staff on the ground in Artibonite days before the outbreak was even confirmed to be cholera. International Medical Corps’ teams aggressively rolled out a network of cholera treatment centers (CTCs) and mobile medical units in Haiti’s most remote and affected areas, in order to provide care for more than 39,700 cholera patients. 

Because cholera was a new disease in Haiti, most of the country’s health workers had no experience identifying or treating the disease before the outbreak. International Medical Corps collaborated with the Ministry of Health, engaging, training and employing ministry staff, as well as, local doctors, nurses, and community health workers, in cholera response and treatment techniques. Overall, International Medical Corps trained and mentored more than 1,200 doctors, nurses, and community health workers.  As a result, the network of CTCs were staffed largely by local health professionals and were handed over to the national health system – creating sustainability, building self-reliance and helping to ensure that cholera prevention and treatment would be part of the country’s long-term healthcare infrastructure. 

At the height of the outbreak in the South Department, 14% of cholera cases resulted in death. In response, International Medical Corps provided surge support, capacity building and training for local staff in the area’s two largest treatment centers.  Just one month later, the fatality rate fell to 2.5%, and two months later, it was less than 1%. This success is largely due to the fact that International Medical Corps trained local health professionals to prevent and treat cholera and then mobilized entire communities - from mayor to mom - in the fight against cholera, reaching over 2 million people with cholera education, awareness and prevention messages. 

Since that time, International Medical Corps has continued to build the capacity of local staff and communities to respond to spikes in cholera and prevent cholera from taking hold - including after Hurricane Sandy that wreaked havoc on the country’s fragile infrastructure in October 2012 - and remains one of the few organizations focused on cholera prevention for vulnerable families in the under-resourced northern region of the country.

Over the last year, International Medical Corps responded to an increase in cholera cases that began in June 2013 in the North and North-East Districts. International Medical Corps’ "Cholera Response and Prevention Teams", staffed by local doctors, nurses, and hygiene specialists, visited communities in each district at least once each month, and up to several times a month for the more vulnerable communities. Teams worked directly with health clinics, and spread hygiene and cholera prevention messages to families to thwart the spread of the disease. In total, teams supported 33 ministry facilities; stocked local clinics with rehydration salts, the primary medication used in cholera treatment; provided medication, education, outreach and treatment benefitting 1.5 million people; distributed more than 300,000 water purifying tablets to families; disinfected latrines and households; and distributed additional hygiene items, including soap and detergents. These efforts contributed to a marked decrease in cholera cases; reported cholera cases fell in the first six months of 2014 by 80% in the North Department and 93% in the North-East Department.

International Medical Corps’ cholera treatment and prevention projects have been largely successful, however, cholera is still present in many parts of Haiti. During the hurricane season, when storms can wreak havoc on infrastructure, it remains critical that communities are ready to prepare for increases in cholera cases.  Preparation includes the distribution of chlorination tabs; buckets; and water filters, so that families can ensure that their water is clean. The generous support from Global Giving and other donors continues to help International Medical Corps deliver these critical and effective cholera treatment and prevention programs and bring clean water to communities in rural Haiti.

Delivering medical supplies to health centers
Delivering medical supplies to health centers
Evaluating a cholera patient
Evaluating a cholera patient
Sanitizing a home that experienced a cholera case
Sanitizing a home that experienced a cholera case
Educating locals about the dangers of cholera
Educating locals about the dangers of cholera

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Steve Bostian on June 19, 2014

June 2014 Update

Where there is water....there is life!

                
Chikungunya Outbreak Affects Deep Springs Staff 
Painful virus spreading across Haiti
Contributed by Christina Boyes
 

The mosquito-borne virus known as Chikungunya is spreading quickly in Haiti. Standing water and infected mosquitoes have combined to create a public health crisis. To date, more than half of the Léogâne office staff has been infected.
 
Michael Ritter, founder of Deep Springs International, was one of the first to contract the illness. "The most common symptoms are joint pain, rash, fever, and headaches. On the first day, I felt like I hit my foot on something, but couldn't remember what. That night I started to feel more generalized pain, and realized it might be Chikungunya." Ritter said. 
 
One driver/security guard for Deep Springs was also affected. 
 
The virus is prevalent in Léogâne due to its proximity to the coast. Like most illnesses carried by mosquito, the hardest hit areas are coastal regions or areas with high amounts of standing water. 
 
Chikungunya is relatively rare in the western hemisphere. According to the CDC, the first cases in the Americas were reported in the Caribbean in 2013. At present, no vaccine or medicine is available for prevention or treatment of the illness.
 
During the course of the infection, many individuals find the pain debilitating. However, most patients recover within one week.  
 

Deep Springs International spent the first few months of 2014 developing a new strategic direction in Leogane. We were thrilled to see that in March, the first month of fully implementing this new approach, that we had the best month in a year and a half. The new strategy includes new promotion methods, new agents, and a new credit system.

New Promotion Method: The biggest change in methodology was the suspension of household visits. Traditionally, this has been our primary method of reaching families in need of health education, water-purification products, and encouragement to consistently and properly treat their drinking water. However, in Leogane, for various reasons, this method was decreasing in effectiveness.

The new method involves community meetings instead of household visits. This approach is more cost-effective, but it seems to also be more effective in terms of education and behavior modification – as families who attend receive a lot of “positive peer pressure” from their friends and neighbors who share openly why they sacrifice their pennies (gourdes) to treat their water, and the health benefits they have seen.

Transitioning away from household visits has also led to our sales agents now working strictly on a commission basis. Agents always received a margin for sales of chlorine, but those who conducted household visits used to receive additional compensation. The new approach based solely on commission places even greater incentives on chlorine sales, which is our key indicator for both health impact and financial sustainability.

New Agents: Much of our efforts in January and February focused on recruiting and training new sales agents. We have recruited and trained over 40 new sales agents in 2014. In addition to an almost all-new sales team, the new method encourages sales via a variety of retail outlets such as pharmacies, boutiques, and schools. We even have sales points in previously unreached areas in the neighboring commune of Grand Goave.

New Credit System. We also launched a system of providing chlorine to new sales agents on credit. 28 new agents have paid for their initial stock and purchased more. The current sales numbers only include chlorine that has been paid for, which doesn’t account for an additional 1,000 bottles of chlorine that have been provided on credit. We expect to receive payment for most of those bottles this month, which would make May another high-sales month similar to March, which was our highest-selling month in at least a year and a half.

Did You Know....?
There are many Haitian proverbs that talk about water, a testimony to its importance on the island. 
"Wòch nadlo pa konn doulè wòch nan soley."
"The stone in the water does not know the pain of the stone in the sun."
 
WATER FACT
 
According to the Mayo Clinic, women should consume an average of 2.2 liters of water per day. Men require more - they need an average of 3 liters per day. 
 
You Can Make a Difference Today 
Check out these opportunities to be a part of Deep Springs International
 
Communications Intern in Haiti:  We are still accepting resumes for this Summer as well as Spring Semester 2015.  This is a full-time internship in Haiti for a minimum of four months.   Strong preference for those fluent in French or Haitian Creole.  
 
Development Intern in Pittsburgh: This is a part-time or full-time internship for a minimum of six months.  Strong preference for Pittsburgh native.  
 
 
 
 
 

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Marie Marthe Saint Cyr on June 12, 2014

500 Women Solidarity Enterprising Community Credit

Some of the members of COFECA
Some of the members of COFECA

Mesina stood proud and said "I am growing my business, keeping my children in school and my family alive.  I do not have to pay an arm and a leg for it and I am helping other women do the same,"

This is the story of one of 500 women who started a mutual fund putting together their one dollar (45 HTG) contribution at their monthly meeting. COFECA met the Lambi Fund a year ago and presented their proposal to develop their community credit inside the organization who is involved in transforming peanut into peanut butter; supporting women who make jelly to sell on the local market and seamstresses making clothing for local children and adults.  This organization has been struggling to expand their membership's enterprises.  

Lambi fund has funded the community credit fund to create a revolving fund.  Today 125 women of the 500 have already expanded their business with 5,000 HTG loan payable at 2% to the organization.  The interest is over 10% below  the market rate, and  will be used to expand loans to other members.  

The credit helps generate new revenue to assist women and expand food production in the Kavayon region.  Lambi Fund is currently supporting  9 organizations, like COFECA, with micro credit funds for over a thousand members to have access to small loans at 2% interest to generate or reinforce their small enterprise.  According to Foreign Policy.com, Haiti registers 75% of unemployment and widespread underemployment (2013). Building one's own enterprise is their income and revenue producing activity that keeps the family fed, the children in school.  It is the way out of poverty.  Creating work that generate an income for families is one of the many facets of rebuilding Haiti in the longterm.  

Leading a COFECA meeting
Leading a COFECA meeting

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on May 20, 2014

PIH Haiti Earthquake Recovery - May 2014 Update

The following article was published by Observer News on March 19, 2014.  In this article, the author discusses the successes observed during his most recent trip to Haiti, including PIH's University Hospital in Mirebalais, made possible with your support to help build back better in Haiti after the earthquake. 

Haiti Revisited, 2014

In nearly 14 years of witnessing the changes in Haiti, this trip was the first time I have seen real change.

By HAL OTT

Love. Hope. Determination. Pride. Extreme Poverty. Progress. Resilience.

These are but a few of the words that come to mind after my most recent visit to Haiti. I have been witnessing the ups and downs of the people of Haiti since my first visit to the country in April 2000. These people have suffered from corrupt governments and endured some of the most horrific natural disasters ever since they became free from slavery in 1804.

A gentleman in his sixties who moved to Port au Prince from a comfortable lifestyle in Canada told me once that Haiti was a “land of failed good intentions.” He explained that most of the aid going to Haiti was from churches and service organizations from the United States and around the world. People with the most loving and giving hearts bringing clothes, love, food, candy, beads and a labor force to build new churches, church schools and to feed countless starving children and adults.

For many years I was one of those Good Samaritans. And perhaps there is a need to fill a gap, to build hope and to provide food and a sense of belonging to something. Certainly, there was an urgent need to give them a leg up after the recent natural disasters.

But Jack Wall, the Canadian, and his wife, and now his daughter, taught me what Haitians really want. They do not want a handout. They do not want someone else coming to their country to tell them how to live and what to do or what to believe. For, in doing so, we help to create a country of beggars with poor self-esteem and a lack of dignity and self-respect.

The future of Haiti must be rooted in its people’s desire to be responsible, productive, participatory citizens. The rebuilding of their country must be in the hands of the Haitian people. Begin with what they have. Build on what they know. Work with them in their planning for a sustainable future.

 In my nearly 14 years of witnessing the changes in Haiti, this trip was the first time that I have seen real change. I believe President Michel Martelly and his government have truly accomplished more to empower the people and to help Haitians to help themselves than in any other time in the past. New roads, bridges, sanitation, health care, foreign investment, jobs, a safer environment policed by the Haitian police — all are but a few of the advancements I noticed.

There is a rebuilding of the country from the bottom up and from the top down. This was the first time that I entered the country that the smell of burnt charcoal did not permeate the air. Reforestry projects are increasing. Small rural farmers are getting small loans to practice sustainable agriculture. Haitians teaching Haitians and helping one another.

I visited a hospital in the central mountainous village of Mirebalais. The hospital was founded by the renowned Harvard physician Dr. Paul Farmer. Farmer is perhaps the world’s foremost leader and expert on global health care for the poor.

Named Hospital Universitaire, the facility just celebrated its first anniversary. It employs 56 Haitian physicians, more than 100 nurses and approximately 700 other people, more than 99 percent of whom are Haitian. The hospital covers more than 200,000 square feet and is equipped with the very latest technology. It offers nearly all specialty areas, including infectious disease, surgery, obstetrics, ophthalmology, dentistry, cardiology and oncology.

It has more than 300 beds. The entire medical facility, including dorms for doctors and nurses, is 100 percent solar powered. The cost for admission for care is the equivalent of $1.25 per person.

It serves not only a local population of 185,000 but also special-care patients who travel from Port au Prince, a three-hour trip. Yes, to get the project built necessitated support from around the world, but it is a hospital built, staffed and run by Haitians for Haitians.

I also visited an urban gardening project in a very poor part of Port au Prince. There I saw Haitians teaching and helping their neighbors to grow their own food from seed. They use any container available — from the back casing of an old television to an old tire. Within 15 days, they can harvest spinach to feed their families. Any harvest left after filling the needs of their families is given to their neighbors. A sense of community and trust is built.

In this one project, more than 170 people were growing beans, spinach, cabbage, carrots, tomatoes and other food that was totally unfamiliar to me. It is a project developed by Haitians, owned by Haitians and managed by Haitians.

Don’t get me wrong. I have no false illusions about the challenges that this country faces. With the average age of a Haitian being 22, and 200,000 new people coming into the workforce every year, there is no quick-and-easy fix. But foreigners must recognize that the hand-out philosophy of past decades has not worked to rebuild this country.

With perhaps a million people willing and able to work, does it make sense for our high-school-  and college-age students to go to Haiti to lay cement block for them? Will Haitians feel like they own that church or that church school that we foreigners have built for them? Yes, it makes us feel good about ourselves, but this is not a sustainable, participatory way to build a country of responsible Haitians with self-worth and dignity.

The empowerment of women is helping. Ending the myth that this beautiful island is not safe for tourists and foreign investment also will help. Sitting down side-by-side with Haitians who have a plan for a productive, participatory project and sharing with them ideas for them to reach their goals is, in my opinion, the best road to their future.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Emily Pedano on May 01, 2014

The Path to a Developed Haiti!

Hygiene lesson in a school
Hygiene lesson in a school

The earthquake may have passed and structures have been rebuilt, but our amazing partner organizations for this GlobalGiving disaster fund appreciate the need for a sustainable haitian future. The flow of recovery has shifted to a need to develop! Our partners recognize this disaster not only as a horrific event but also an opportunity to build a better tomorrow for the Haitian people.

International Medical Corps (IMC) is tackling Haiti’s ongoing cholera outbreaks. They were also there in October 2010 when the outbreaks began right after the quake. Since the earthquake they have been actively seeking out individuals with cholera in Haiti via their mobile medical units. When IMC discovers a patient in need they promptly deploy their mobile units along with their professional medical staff. The northern, rural areas have been most affected by cholera, so logically IMC focuses on this region. Once staff reach the patient they immediately provide care to the ill. Since cholera causes severe dehydration the treatments include Oral Rehydration Salts, aquatabs, and general hygiene improvement. Once the patient is stable, International Medical Corps turns to the individual’s household. They provide sanitation tools to clean the house and they teach proper clean water practices. After the house has been sanitized, IMC turns their attention to the entire community! They rally advocacy networks to spread awareness about cholera and spread campaigns of clean water practices. Obviously IMC is dedicated to providing not just life-saving care but also lasting and sustainable care throughout the entire community!

Big things are happening at Volunteers for Interamerican Development Assistance (VIDA)! Quite literally! Recently, thanks to your awesome donations through this GlobalGiving fund, VIDA has been able to ship massive amounts of medical supplies to St. Damien Pediatric Hospital! This children’s hospital in Port-au-Prince provides free health services to the most impoverished youth of the tiny island nation. This hospital gives children life-saving care that their family would otherwise not have been able to afford, this includes surgery costs and cancer treatments. Thanks to your generous donations VIDA could send 12 pallets worth of medical supply! A special thanks to their shipping partner Otis McAllister! Things that your donations directly funded: patient gowns, surgical gowns, exam gloves, diapers, Stanford Hospital donated exam tables, and CVS donated 50,000 face masks! Like I said, they are doing big things and creating lasting impact! Thanks for making that possible!

While our first two partners focused on healthcare, our third partner, Lambi Fund of Haiti, is making sure citizens stay fed, employed, and sustainable! Lambi has a wide breadth of organizational focus, they span many fields in their work and overall promote social and economic empowerment of the Haitian people. The end of 2013 brought five nursery management trainings, three capacity building and accounting trainings, and two credit fund management trainings. This means that by the end of 2013 at least 150 community members will have participated in a Lambi training or presentation. These people now have skills in community organization, democratic principles, gender equity, reforestation techniques, animal husbandry and many more beneficial practices. These small steps forward are measured in leaps and bounds for the community! This empowerment and teaching strategy will create a brave and lasting Haiti!

While Haiti is still rebuilding, there has been a conscious shift from recovery to sustainable future. Our partners for this fund, with obvious different strategies, all have the same goal of creating a future for the haitian people. These organizations are standout because of their utter dedication to regrowth and forward strides. Once again we thank you for your amazing donations, you are adding to a better world!

Providing cholera treatment to an infant
Providing cholera treatment to an infant
Re-hydrating a cholera patient
Re-hydrating a cholera patient
Community Member in his Nursery
Community Member in his Nursery
One of the goat pens built by the women of OFJ
One of the goat pens built by the women of OFJ

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Jason Graber on April 10, 2014

Treating Cholera with Mobile Medical Units

Providing cholera treatment to an infant
Providing cholera treatment to an infant

Following its response to the catastrophic earthquake in Haiti in 2010, International Medical Corps’ teams responded to the equally devastating outbreak of cholera in late October 2010. International Medical Corps was one of the very first organizations to respond and had medical staff on the ground in one of the worst areas – Artibonite – days before the outbreak was confirmed to be cholera. International Medical Corps aggressively rolled out a network of cholera treatment centers (CTCs) and mobile medical units in Haiti’s most remote and affected areas to care for more than 39,700 cholera patients. International Medical Corps also trained and mentored more than 1,200 doctors, nurses, and community health workers so that our network of CTCs were established and staffed largely by local health professionals and could eventually be handed over to the MoH and be a part of the country’s long-term infrastructure to prevent and treat cholera. 

Since that time, International Medical Corps’ work has focused on cholera preparedness and response to outbreaks, particularly in rural areas where access to health services and knowledge of cholera and how to prevent it is very low. During 2013, International Medical Corps’ work focused on cholera education and prevention activities in the Grand North, considered one of the country’s most under-served areas in terms of infrastructure and economy. The Grand North (including the North, Northeast and Northwest Departments) has demonstrated its vulnerability to cholera outbreaks, and since the initial outbreak in 2010, there have been over 135,374 suspected cholera cases within the three departments, with this region also seeing a higher case fatality rate than that of Haiti nationally, at 1.6%.

In response, International Medical Corps assessed the needs of several remote communities in the North and North-East Districts and focused its support on re-supply of the area’s health centers with general use and cholera medicines while also delivering education campaigns to help local residents prevent the spread of cholera. International Medical Corps, in partnership with the Council of Haitian Non-State Players (CONHANE) and the MSPP, worked with four community based organizations in the selected communities to conduct cholera prevention awareness activities through house-to-house visits and hygiene awareness sessions in churches and schools. By the end of 2013, International Medical Corps’ cholera prevention efforts in the north of Haiti indirectly benefitted more than 125,000 people.

Now, in 2014, International Medical Corps has continued its work responding to cholera outbreaks in Haiti in the Grand North through mobile medical units. International Medical Corps currently operates six mobile medical units staffed by trained Haitian health personnel who investigate suspected cases of cholera, provide treatment or referral, and sensitize and educate at-risk communities. Once a suspected case is identified through the surveillance system, International Medical Corps’ mobile medical unit team quickly deploys to the area to investigate the suspected case and provide treatment or support referral to the nearest health facility. The team educates the household and provide supplies to disinfect the home. The teams teach proper hand washing techniques; the importance of water treatment in order to avoid contracting cholera; and the proper use of latrines and waste management techniques.

After the household work is complete, the mobile medical team then focuses its prevention efforts with the surrounding community. The team trains and mobilizes community volunteers in the surrounding community to assist in awareness campaigns to remind the population that cholera is still present in their community and that they need to apply good hygiene practice to avoid the spread of cholera. As needed, the mobile medical teams also directly teach local residents how to identify all types of diarrheal related water diseases and cholera in particular, and how to properly prepare and use oral rehydration salts – critical tools in the fight against cholera. 

Thanks to the generosity of Global Giving and other generous donors, International Medical Corps’ six mobile medical team (two in each targeted Department - the North, Northeast and Northwest) have achieved the following results from 2014 to-date: 19,576 individuals have been reached to-date with cholera prevention and health promotion messages, 19,127 Oral Rehydration Salt (ORS) sachets and 88,450 aqua tabs were distributed, and 771 cases of acute diarrhea have been treated by International Medical Corps’ teams. While this work has helped to save lives and has laid an important foundation of knowledge in vulnerable communities in the Grand North, each hurricane season now brings with it the potential for a large scale outbreak, which combined with difficult terrain and low access to health care, could result in a rapid increase in cases and deaths. Looking forward, International Medical Corps plans to continue these mobile medical units in the Grand North through the fall and then transition to broader Disaster Risk Reduction activities to help to further build resilience at the individual, household, and community level to dangerous threats such as cholera as well as other hazards in the region.

Hygiene education session for the community
Hygiene education session for the community
Hygiene lesson in a school
Hygiene lesson in a school
Re-hydrating a cholera patient
Re-hydrating a cholera patient

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Marie Marthe Saint Cyr on March 13, 2014

Rebuilding Efforts from Rural Farmers in Haiti

KPM Nursery
KPM Nursery

Peasant farmers are working locally making a difference in the standards of living in their respective communities in spite of challenging climatic events like hurricane Sandy and the drought that followed. In our partnership with rural farmers in Haiti, we continue to witness remarkable courage, determination and resilience. Indicators like increasing memberships in local organizations, the level of utilization of service like ox-plowing, irrigation, water provision from the riverbed are all elements of building more sustainability for communities assuming leadership to create long term change in their quality of life.

The Association of Farmers and Breeders of Akin (APEAG), located in the Artibonite region, began their goat breeding in 2012. Since the inception of the partnership, their membership increased by 31%, their herds have grown from 120 to 222 and now to a 342 animal count benefiting 126 members. The Veterinary pharmacy extends its services to the whole community stabilizing animal health among all farmers through preventive vaccination and medicine for disease management. The project is in its evaluation phase but its impact is showing positive progress beyond the membership.

Below are summaries of the projects and their status of implementation:

Increase food production in rural communities in Haiti.  By the end of 2012, over 80 percent of the sustainable agriculture and animal husbandry projects supported by Lambi Fund will increase their annual crop yields or animal production.

o  Lambi Fund supported five new or continuing grain mill projects in 2012. Four, or 80 percent, of grain mills are operating and have directly increased the amount of crop local farmers are processing for sale in the local market.
o  Lambi Fund also supported seven new or continuing animal husbandry projects in 2012, 100% of which saw an increase in healthy goat and sheep production. However, Lambi Fund had the hard target of producing 628 kid goats in 2012, though only 564 were born as of late December, a shortfall of ten percent. This is largely attributed to one project, the Peasants Organization of Bige (OPB), where a number of goats initially purchased for the project fell ill in transit. Some died, and others failed to bring their kids to term.

By the end of 2013, over 80 percent of the sustainable agriculture and animal husbandry projects supported by Lambi Fund will have access to resources to increase their annual agricultural activity.

o  Lambi Fund has launched four new sustainable agriculture or animal husbandry projects in the first five months of 2013, including: OPMO Irrigation, SADN Ox-Plow Service, OPDTM Goat Breeding, and KAPKAK Coffee production. APCE goat breeding and APKB irrigation and agro credit.  In 2013 goat breeding has yielded an additional 688 goats
o  Lambi Fund has also launched a new phase in the Center for Plantain Production (CPP) project to support papitas (plaintain chips production)& Cooperative Agricultural Production of Gros Morne) KOPWAGM and explore community needs to identify crops that future training initiatives should support.

Improve access to credit in rural communities in Haiti.  By the end of 2012, at a minimum six community credit funds will be reinforced.

o  Lambi Fund supported one project in 2012 with reinforcement of a community credit fund as its main activity. Funds were disbursed to the organization, Association of Women for Action in Gros Morne (AFAGM), in December 2012, and the first lending cycle is complete and has been fully reimbursed. AFAGM is proceeding with the second lending cycle to his women members.
o  Lambi Fund also supported four other projects with community credit funds as a supporting activity. One organization, Peasant Movement for the Agricultural Development of Delann (MOPDAD), reinforced two credit funds, one which specifically targeted female members, while the other three organizations reinforced one fund each.

By the end of 2013, at a minimum, three additional community credit funds will be reinforced.

o  Lambi Fund has launched four new projects involving community credit fund reinforcement in the first five months of 2013: AGPBRM, OPAGDEVES, and OPMO. AGPK
o  Additionally, AFAGM has completed its second lending cycle with HTG 250,000 gourdes. AFAGM members are using the loans to support their small food and clothing vending businesses, though two members have put the money towards their small restaurant.

Improve sanitation in rural areas of Haiti.  By the end of 2012, at a minimum, 16 community latrines are built and maintained by eight grassroots organizations.

o  Lambi Fund supported the construction of ten community latrines, each containing three units and equipped with hand soap and a small cistern for clean water. The 37.5 percent shortfall is due to lack of funds.
o  Lambi Fund also supported the construction of 14 cisterns in the northwest.

By the end of 2013, at a minimum, ten community latrines are built and maintained by five grassroots organizations.

o  Lambi Fund staff is currently working with its partners to raise funding to add latrines.
o  The risk of cholera during the rainy season is higher, so Lambi Fund staff is discussing prevention practices with its partners, distributing visual aid information on prevention of cholera, the treatment of water.
o  Lambi Fund has adopted a new project policy. Every project construction will have latrines and access to water for hygiene and sanitation.

Increase reforestation efforts in Haiti.  By the end of 2012, at a minimum, eight community organizations are planning or have completed a reforestation project, resulting in a total of at least 120,000 trees planted.

o  In 2012, six Lambi Fund supported projects planted a total of 160,000 tree seedlings.
o  The remaining two organizations that launched Lambi Fund-supported projects in 2012 are planning the reforestation phases of their projects in 2013.

By the end of 2013, at a minimum, five community organizations are planning or have completed a reforestation project, resulting in a total of at least 100,000 trees planted.

o  Lambi Fund launched one new Reforestation project in the first five months of 2013: MPC is planting 60,000 fruit and shade tree seedlings. Additionally, KAPKAK will plant 45,000 coffee tree seedlings and 15,000 shade tree seedlings in its Sustainable Development project.
o  KPM has planted a second round of 60,000 tree seedlings, having distributed the first round among its members.

Increase skills and knowledge of leaders.  By the end 2012, 80 percent of the organizational leaders will indicate an increase in leadership and community organizing skills, democratic principles, gender equity and reforestation techniques, as well as skills gained in at least one of the following areas: community credit fund management; sustainable agriculture practices; animal husbandry techniques; or water quality and health, sanitation and hygiene techniques.

In 2012, Lambi Fund organized:

o  Twenty organizational management and leadership development trainings.
o  Seven animal husbandry trainings.
o  Ten sustainable agriculture trainings.
o  One environment training.
o  Two gender equity seminars.

By the end 2013, at least 150 organizational members will have participated in trainings for leadership and community organizing skills, democratic principles, gender equity and reforestation techniques, as well as at least one of the following: community credit fund management; sustainable agriculture practices; animal husbandry techniques; or water quality and health, sanitation and hygiene techniques.

Thus far in 2013, Lambi Fund has organized:

o  Five nursery management trainings.
o  Three capacity building and accounting trainings.
o  Two credit fund management trainings.

Your donation has made it possible for us to partner with peasant farmers to create activities that lead to the reduction of poverty in their respective communities. Know that increased revenue and job creation through alternative economy results in increased capacity for parents to cultivate more land, ability to pay the schooling for their children, and access medical care for their families. Because our projects are sustainable, we assist our partners to improve their quality of life for their families and their communities.

One of the goat pens built by the women of OFJ
One of the goat pens built by the women of OFJ

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on February 06, 2014

Container bound for St. Damien Hospital

VIDA is establishing a foothold in Haiti. VIDA will be making its second shipment to St. Damien Pediatric Hospital that provides free healthcare to Haiti’s poorest children. St. Damien performs advanced medical care from cancer treatment to surgeries for children who would otherwise die. The container is sponsored by our shipping partner Otis McAllister and is carrying 12 pallets of medical supplies and equipment including patient gowns, surgical gowns, exam gloves, diapers, and exam tables donated by Stanford Hospital. The shipment also contains 50,000 face masks donated by CVS Pharmacy.

VIDA is also continuing our support for a project in Cayes Jacmel, managed by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloir. Dr. Alix has been providing critical care to thousands residents with the aid of VIDA. Dr. Magloire works with a team of doctors and volunteers who provide care and help transport the donated supplies to remote communities surrounding Cayes Jacmel.

VIDA thank are Global Giving donors for their generous support and making our work in Haiti possible.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on February 05, 2014

Haiti Earthquake Recovery - Feb 2014 Update

Rebecca E. Rollins/Partners In Health
Rebecca E. Rollins/Partners In Health
(above) A 24-year-old patient rests with her baby boy on the day following her cesarean section in July at University Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti. University Hospital doctors and nurses have delivered more than 800 babies in less than a year of operation.

On January 12, 2014, the fourth anniversary of the Haitian Earthquake, Partners In Health published the below story on our website.   Please take a moment to read about some of the significant progress taking place in Haiti, thanks to the generosity of people like you.  Your support has enabled PIH to bring hope to the people of Haiti.

After Earthquake, University Hospital is Transforming Lives in Haiti

Four years after an earthquake struck Haiti’s capital—damaging its already-weak medical infrastructure—a new public teaching hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti,

Training the next generation of clinicians

A key function of the hospital is to train Haiti’s next generation of social justice doctors, nurses, and other health professionals. Workshops and trainings began before the first patient stepped foot in the building, but training has ramped up as specialty services come online. Since June, the hospital has hosted more than 165 trainings, including cardiac resuscitation training for 91 medical staff.

In fall 2013, the teaching hospital marked a significant milestone with the entrance of its first class of medical residents. These 14 young Haitian doctors are training to become specialists in pediatrics, internal medicine, and surgery, and a new class will enroll every year. Read more about this first enthusiastic class of residents here.

In 2014, hospital leaders will begin training for other specialties. Nurses will be trained in anesthesiology and critical care, skill sets that are necessary for emergency and surgical care. New medical residencies are being planned for obstetrics-gynecology, orthopedic surgery, anesthesiology, and emergency medicine, which would be the first such residency in the country.

“You don’t learn how to be a doctor in medical school,” said Dr. Michelle Morse, who has helped plan medical education programs at University Hospital. “It’s during residency that you dive in and begin to understand what it’s all about.”

Catalyzing economic growth

University Hospital has also helped grow the economy of the Central Plateau.

Researchers from PIH, Haiti, and the United States teamed up to analyze the economic impact of University Hospital, using what’s known as an input-output model. They estimated that for every $1 invested in the hospital, $1.82 is pushed into the Haitian economy.

Essentially, the influx of resources in one sector of the economy—health care and teaching in this case—will affect other sectors of the economy through what’s called the “multiplier effect.” This will result in an economic impact far greater than that of the original investment.

“The idea behind the input-output approach is intuitively simple,” the researchers note in a working paper.

Researchers used an input of $16.2 million, the estimated long-run annual full-capacity operating cost of University Hospital. Using the model, the team found that a $16.2 million investment in the hospital spills over into other sectors of the economy, resulting in an impact of $29.4 million in the broader Haitian economy. To learn more and see a graphic illustration of this model, click here.

Four years after the earthquake, Partners In Health is grateful to the many supporters and partners who helped make University Hospital a reality for the people we serve, and we look forward to making an even greater impact through our sustained commitment to Haiti in the years to come.

Since opening in March 2013, University Hospital has treated thousands of people who previously had little—or no—access to health care. The facility, built by Partners In Health and Haiti’s Ministry of Health, also serves as a training ground for Haiti’s future clinicians, and is a catalyst for economic growth in the region.

New access to medical services

University Hospital provides care for a referral area in which 3.4 million people live, including people in Mirebalais and two surrounding “communes,” or regions.

Since opening, staff members have registered more than 42,000 patients, providing more than 55,000 clinical visits. About 60 percent of patients are from the three regions closest to the hospital, and about the same proportion are women, according to data from the hospital’s electronic medical record system.

“The quality of care patients are receiving is speaking for itself, and the word is getting out,” said Marc Julmisse, University Hospital chief nursing officer, who is Haitian-American. "Our staff is doing an amazing job, and it goes to show—from outpatient services to inpatient care to the emergency room—that Haiti needs a hospital like this.”

Clinicians see more than 700 patients on a typical day.

The hospital employs about 700 people, including about 300 nursing staff and 50 doctors. Seventy percent of its employees are from the Central Plateau.

The hospital has an emergency department, state-of-the-art operating rooms, and a specially designed electronic medical record system. A system of 1,800 solar panels produces most of the facility’s energy needs. To read more about University Hospital’s solar energy system, click here.

Demand for services has grown as referrals from other facilities increased and word spread about free specialty care at University Hospital that was unavailable elsewhere in Haiti. For example, analyses of where surgery patients live show that people travel from all over Haiti to receive surgical care at the hospital.

Since the maternity wards opened, clinicians have delivered more than 800 babies, about 25 percent of which were born through cesarean sections—a rate that reflects the hospital’s role as a referral center for pregnancies with expected complications.

Since March, the following services have opened at University Hospital:

Training the next generation of clinicians

A key function of the hospital is to train Haiti’s next generation of social justice doctors, nurses, and other health professionals. Workshops and trainings began before the first patient stepped foot in the building, but training has ramped up as specialty services come online. Since June, the hospital has hosted more than 165 trainings, including cardiac resuscitation training for 91 medical staff.

In fall 2013, the teaching hospital marked a significant milestone with the entrance of its first class of medical residents. These 14 young Haitian doctors are training to become specialists in pediatrics, internal medicine, and surgery, and a new class will enroll every year. Read more about this first enthusiastic class of residents here.

In 2014, hospital leaders will begin training for other specialties. Nurses will be trained in anesthesiology and critical care, skill sets that are necessary for emergency and surgical care. New medical residencies are being planned for obstetrics-gynecology, orthopedic surgery, anesthesiology, and emergency medicine, which would be the first such residency in the country.

“You don’t learn how to be a doctor in medical school,” said Dr. Michelle Morse, who has helped plan medical education programs at University Hospital. “It’s during residency that you dive in and begin to understand what it’s all about.”

Catalyzing economic growth

University Hospital has also helped grow the economy of the Central Plateau.

Researchers from PIH, Haiti, and the United States teamed up to analyze the economic impact of University Hospital, using what’s known as an input-output model. They estimated that for every $1 invested in the hospital, $1.82 is pushed into the Haitian economy.

Essentially, the influx of resources in one sector of the economy—health care and teaching in this case—will affect other sectors of the economy through what’s called the “multiplier effect.” This will result in an economic impact far greater than that of the original investment.

“The idea behind the input-output approach is intuitively simple,” the researchers note in a working paper.

Researchers used an input of $16.2 million, the estimated long-run annual full-capacity operating cost of University Hospital. Using the model, the team found that a $16.2 million investment in the hospital spills over into other sectors of the economy, resulting in an impact of $29.4 million in the broader Haitian economy. To learn more and see a graphic illustration of this model, click here.

Four years after the earthquake, Partners In Health is grateful to the many supporters and partners who helped make University Hospital a reality for the people we serve, and we look forward to making an even greater impact through our sustained commitment to Haiti in the years to come.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Emily Pedano on January 30, 2014

You're supporting sustainable healthcare in Haiti!

First Class of Residents at HUM
First Class of Residents at HUM

Four years have past since the tragic 7.0 magnitutde earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010. This disaster took the lives of over 200,000 and affected around three million others. Today I am going to tell you about just one of the amazing projects that have been accomplished thanks to amazing GlobalGivers like you!

 

Partners in Health strives to bring modern medicine to those less privileged and often most in need of the care. In this particular project they are responding to the medical needs of the 2010 earthquake and subsequent disasters that have struck Haiti. Their most recent report details the journey of the 14 doctors in residence in Haiti’s first ever specialized teaching hospital!

After the 2010 earthquake Partners in Health set out on the huge task to construct a teaching hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti. University Hospital of Mirebalais (HUM) opened in 2012 and welcomed its first class of medical residents in October 2013. In order to qualify for membership in this program the all Haitian doctors had to go through an intensive merit-based application process. 238 people applied and took an entrance exam. Of those, 45 were interviewed, and 14 men and women were selected for the program.

In their several year residence the doctors will participate in  hands-on training in pediatrics, general surgery, and internal medicine. They will also rotate departments such as emergency medicine, TB/HIV clinic, and oncology, as well as conduct research to improve the quality of care. The program will also train the doctors in social medicine with regard to the root causes of disease, such as poverty.

This is only the first class of doctors to train outside of Port-au-Prince, the traditional medical training facility. Every fall University Hospital will take a new class of doctors eager to expand the basis of care in Haiti. There are only 25 physicians per 100,000 Haitians. The United States has more than tenfold that number: 280 doctors for every 100,000 Americans. This is why the progress at University Hospital is so important. And it is due to GlobalGivers like you that this progress is possible!

Dr Pierre Paul, PIH senior advisor at HUM, has this to say about the future of the hospital and Haitian medicine: "University Hospital and its new residency program stand as formidable evidence of the efforts that young Haitian health professionals are making to restore, in a sustainable way, hope and dignity in the future of health in Haiti."

 

GlobalGiving and Partners in Health cannot thank you enough for your awesome donations to this project! It is because of you that not only hundreds of lives will be saved, but also the future sustainability of healthcare in Haiti is bright and hopeful!

 

Residents Learning at HUM
Residents Learning at HUM
Hopital Universitaire de Mirebalais (HUM)
Hopital Universitaire de Mirebalais (HUM)
Solar Panels for Sustainability at HUM
Solar Panels for Sustainability at HUM

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Steve Bostian on January 13, 2014

4th Quarter Report

 

Displaced persons in Haiti still at risk 
172,000 living away from their homes almost 4 years post quake
 
                                                                                                         Photo credit:  blogher.com
 
Even though the United Nations officially ended its earthquake relief program, the devastating effects of the 2010 disaster – one of the worst in world history – continue.   Since our last report there has been an encouraging relocation effort, but according to the IOM there are still 172,000 displaced people and the economy is still in shambles.  Learn more info about the crisis with displaced persons.
 
 
 
Also, with an epidemic of more than 682,000 cases, over 8,300 Haitians have died of cholera – a totally preventable disease.  Deep Springs continues to play a lead role in Haiti's anti-cholera campaign.   Pan American Health Organization officials fear that, if the disease is not controlled soon, it will spread to epidemic proportions throughuot the hemisphere.   According to PAHO the Dominican Republic has reported over 31,000 cholera cases and 458 deaths since 2010, Cuba has confirmed 678 cases and 3 deaths since July 2012, and Mexico has confirmed 171 cases and 1 death since September of this year.
World Health Organization 
Recognizes Deep Springs in new publication
 
The World Health Organization (WHO) recently published a toolkit on monitoring and evaluation for household water treatment efforts. 
 
Three of Deep Springs' studies about the effectiveness of our programs are cited as examples in the toolkit.  The Jolivert program is presented as a case study in the toolkit and was also featured at the University of North Carolina's Water and Health Conference recently.  The WHO publication also mentions post-quake research showing that our work resulted in the highest "effective use" of household water treatment products among the emergency responses studied.  
Did You Know....? 
 
HAITI FACT
 
In 1801, ex-slave Toussaint L’Ouverture (1743-1803) led nearly one-half million Haitian slaves against Haiti’s French colonialists. Their eventual victory was the first successful slave revolt and helped establish Haiti as the first black republic.


WATER FACT
 
The worldwide water and sanitation crisis claims more lives through disease than any war claims through guns.  (UNDP)
 

 

 

 

 

 

New Board Members 
Roberts and Aakesson elected at October meeting

Ashley Aakesson Ashley Aakesson is a nutrition, food security, and development leader with 15 years of experience working with vulnerable groups in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean to improve their health and well-being. Ashley joined the SPRING Project in 2013 as a Social and Behavior Change Communication Advisor. She has worked with PATH and Save the Children. From 2006 to 2010 she served as Executive Director of the Children’s Nutrition Program of Haiti, which partnered with DeepSprings before and after the earthquake of 2010. Ashley holds an MA in Applied Anthropology from the University of Maryland and a BA in Anthropology from Miami University in Ohio.
Margaret Roberts lives in Avella, PA with her husband. She is currently the Senior Procurement Manager for Calgon Carbon Corporation.  Margaret graduated from Syracuse University with a bachelor's degree in English and received a Masters in Business Administration from Chatham University.  She joined Calgon Corporation in September of 2013, previously working at LANXESS Corporation and Bayer Corporation.  Margaret has been helping DeepSprings informally in many ways since 2009.

 

Annual Campaign Update 
Chlorine sales add to our sustainable approach
 
Our sustainable approach of selling the locally produced Gadyen Dlo brand chlorine is working!  So far this year sales have topped $90,500 and have really helped push us towards our goal.

Small Sacrifices = Big Impact!
  • For only $2.74 a day (cup of coffee) you are a $1,000 donor
  • For only $5.47 a day (fast food meal) you are a $2,000 donor
That's a small price to pay to provide clean life-saving water in Haiti!

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Jason Graber on January 09, 2014

Treating and Preventing Cholera in Haiti's Grand North District

Child recovering from cholera
Child recovering from cholera

During 2013, International Medical Corps’ efforts in Haiti focused on cholera prevention for vulnerable populations in the north of Haiti, indirectly benefitting more than 125,000 people. According to the Haitian Ministry of Health (MSPP), reports related to new cholera infections started to increase in those communities during the month of June. In response, International Medical Corps conducted weekly visits in Haiti’s Grand North District to confirm and evaluate the situation within targeted health facilities and to assess the condition of the cholera patients. During the visits, several problems were identified by International Medical Corps health professionals, including, among others, a (lack of medical supplies to treat patients infected by cholera and a low awareness of cholera among the at-risk population, to which may be attributed to shortages in available trained health staff and volunteers in the community to conduct Cholera awareness and prevention activities.

International Medical Corps assessed the situation and designed an intervention that would reinforce the capacity of the selected health facilities to response to cholera outbreaks and increase the awareness of the community to avoid the spread of cholera to the remote and underserved areas during the rainy/hurricane season. During the rainy season, flooding from strong tropical storms and hurricanes can contaminate water sources in remote areas and cause waterborne diseases to spread. These storms also damage the already poor road infrastructure, which can lead to medicine shortages and prevent patients with severe cases of cholera from being able to reach major health centers for treatment.

International Medical Corps assessed the needs of several remote communities in the North and North-East Districts and focused its support on re-supply of the area’s health centers with general use and cholera medicines while also delivering education campaigns to help local residents prevent the spread of cholera. Based on the distance and needs of each community and considering the generally poor road infrastructure of the region, four underserved communities and their respective health facilities were selected for this effort.  These health centers were serviced in the following order: (1) Hôpital de l’Espérance de Pilate, (2) Centre de Santé de Dondon, (3) Centre de Santé de Ferrier and (4) Centre de santé de Sainte Suzanne. These four health centers serve a combined population of 125,326 people.

International Medical Corps provided a several month supply of medicines to the health centers and deployed community volunteers through local community based organizations for one month. Awareness training needed to be conducted to help the vulnerable communities recognize the ever present existence of cholera and that they needed to continue using good hygiene practice in order to avoid further cholera contamination. International Medical Corps, in partnership with the Council of Haitian Non-State Players (CONHANE) and the MSPP, worked with four community based organizations in the selected communities to conduct cholera prevention awareness activities through house-to-house visits and hygiene awareness sessions in churches and schools. During the awareness campaigns, the volunteers reminded the population that cholera is still present in their community and that they need to apply good hygiene practice to avoid the spread of cholera.

Thanks to the generosity of Global Giving and other generous donors, the intervention has completed all the planned activities and all result has been positive. International Medical Corps, along with CONHANE, was able to deploy 40 volunteers and two zones coordinators, reaching two communities in the North and two communities in North-East. Over 34,000 people in 4,839 households have been sensitized to the importance of proper hygiene practices to prevent the spread of cholera, and also received Aquatabs and oral rehydration salts (ORS) to treat the disease. Further, all 40 volunteers are available to continue the campaign which will ensure that an even larger number of people can be reached with critical hygiene education in the near future. Additionally, 100,000 water purification tablets (Aquatabs) and 5,000 ORS sachets have been distributed to prevent cholera in the community. While the project has been successful, it is important to remember that cholera is still present in Haiti. Prevention efforts must continue to stop the spread of cholera, particularly in vulnerable communities. 

Poor road conditions hampering medicine delivery
Poor road conditions hampering medicine delivery
Unloading medical supplies
Unloading medical supplies
Group cholera training
Group cholera training
Going door-to-door to teach cholera prevention
Going door-to-door to teach cholera prevention

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on December 12, 2013

Sugarcane Mill is Launching Opportunities

Members of ACHVRO operating the mill
Members of ACHVRO operating the mill

The 89 members of the Partnership for Change in Ravin Olyann (ACHVRO), partnered with the Lambi Fund of Haiti in 2011 to build a sugarcane mill in their community. This mill is now fully operational and has been providing farmers in the area with an affordable and high-quality option for transforming their sugarcane into the more lucrative product, syrup.

As with most projects, ACHVRO has encountered many ups and downs throughout the launch and implemen- tation of this project. By and large, ACHVRO members and farmers in the area report being satisfied with the opening of the mill. It has greatly lessened the burden of having to process syrup at home by hand (which requires days of work) and they no longer have to travel long distances to visit other mills.

One difficulty ACHVRO encountered early on was when heavy rainfall produced bagasse (the fibrous byproduct of milled sugarcane that is used to fuel the mill) that was too wet to use. Then, not enough pans were purchased to boil the cane juice after processing. These pans are difficult to procure in Haiti and potential productivity was lessened as a result. Another difficulty came when production stalled for two weeks in the third quarter while the organization scrambled to have a broken blade repaired. Misfortune struck again when Hurricane Sandy hit in the fourth quarter. It destroyed a sizeable portion of sugarcane crops in the area and left the mill idle often.

Finally, many customers complained that they were not able to process their cane when they needed to due to a combination of long lines and a lack of staff at the facility.

These struggles exemplify why Lambi Fund continues its partnership with organizations long after the mill has opened or the project has launched. Working through issues that arise and learning how to run the mill as effectively and efficiently as possible is part of the learning process. Like all new businesses, members of ACHVRO have had to learn what works and does not work for its business enterprise.

For Lambi Fund, being there to provide support and offer reflections is an essential part of working to strengthen the day-to-day functioning of the project and to ensuring it remains operational for the long-term.

To address some of its shortcomings, ACHVRO is actively working to solve issues that are depressing its ability to meet the demand for mill services—such as procuring three more pans to enable a larger amount of syrup production.

In another instance, the organization's leadership purchased a plot of land using mill profits to increase sugarcane production following Hurricane Sandy. There were some problems in this, however, because this was not done in consultation with all of its members. As a result, Lambi Fund staff discussed with ACHVRO how this was not a democratic way to make decisions. Members agreed and have been working to include theentire membership of ACHVRO on large decisions such as this.

Fortunately, the land purchase has proven to be a beneficial investment (at least in the short-term). Members who lost their crops during Sandy were able to lease a plot of land and jumpstart planting follow- ing the storm. In fact, those that procured plots report having higher incomes than were expected following Sandy.

It is examples like these that make it clear that managing a community-led business enterprise in Haiti is not one with a linear path. There are struggles and stalls and it is important for Lambi Fund to be there to monitor and provide guidance along the way. As a result, ACHVRO is a stronger and more knowledgable organization. It is providing a valuable service to community members and is turning a profit—two accomplishments worth applauding.

Beyond this, ACHVRO is looking to the future as they look to implement other ways it can serve the community. Rooted in the sustainable agriculture training they received from Lambi Fund, ACHVRO is plan- ning an education program that will teach local farmers about pests and diseases that can decrease sugarcane output, as well as strategies to prevent or treat attacks on their crops. It is activities like these that are not only strengthening ACHVRO and its capacity to provide services, but are strengthening the entire community as a whole.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on October 25, 2013

PIH Haiti Earthquake Recovery - Oct.2013 Update

Photo credit: Michelle Morse/PIH
Photo credit: Michelle Morse/PIH

Young Haitian Doctors Begin Medical Residencies at University Hospital

On April 28, Dr. Paul Farmer stood before a microphone in a large conference room in Haiti's University Hospital.

Several days before, bomb blasts at the marathon in Boston, Massachusetts, had killed three people, but not a single person who made it to a hospital died. In that grim emergency, teaching hospitals made a difference, Farmer told the crowd.

“I love working at a great Boston teaching hospital, Brigham and Women’s. I love being able to train the next generation of physicians and nurses. And I want Haiti to have something like it, too,” Farmer said.

This month, University Hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti, took a significant step toward becoming the teaching hospital envisioned after Haiti’s 2010 earthquake, which devastated the country’s already-fragile medical infrastructure. On Oct. 1, the hospital’s first medical residents—all young Haitian doctors—began hands-on training in pediatrics, general surgery, and internal medicine.

The application process was intensive and merit-based: 238 people applied and took an entrance exam. Of those, 45 were interviewed, and 14 were selected. Class members hail from all over Haiti. Some studied at Haiti’s state medical school or private schools in Port-au-Prince; others went to the Dominican Republic. Some just graduated from medical school and completed their social service year; others have been practicing for a few years. By coincidence, the class is evenly split between men and women.

Dr. Jean-Louis Willy Fils, 29, from the northern city of Cap-Haïtien, has wanted to be a doctor for as long as he can remember. He describes surgery as his “true vocation,” so to be selected for a University Hospital residency was more than he hoped for.

“One year ago, I couldn't have even imagined learning surgery in a hospital with an international standard of quality, for the good reason that such a hospital didn't exist in the country yet,” Fils said. “That's the proof that great things can be done in Haiti.”

Over the next several years, these 14 doctors will receive instruction from Haitian and foreign physicians—some of whom are faculty at the same teaching hospital where Farmer trained and now teaches. The curriculum for their training was developed through special working groups and designed to follow the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International’s (ACGME-I) standards.

After completing orientation this month, residents will begin caring for patients as well as rotating in departments such as emergency medicine, TB/HIV clinic, and oncology. Each day, they will spend an hour in special education sessions for residents, and once or twice per week they will be on call throughout the night. They will also conduct research to improve the quality of care. The ACGME-I guidelines require they work no more than 80 hours a week, but they’ll probably come close.

"The residency program at University Hospital represents the most serious attempt, to my knowledge and during my lifetime, to systematically create a critical mass of Haitian physician specialists that will have the opportunity to be fully useful to all Haitians," said Dr. Pierre Paul, PIH senior advisor. He added that he and his physician colleagues have traditionally questioned the poor outcomes of Haiti's health sector, but now feel questioned themselves about their responsibility to improve health care in Haiti. "University Hospital and its new residency program stand as formidable evidence of the efforts that young Haitian health professionals are making to restore, in a sustainable way, hope and dignity in the future of health in Haiti."

As new classes of residents begin each fall, the number of physician trainees will double and triple. And the programs will expand to include other health professionals, such as nurse anesthetists and other nurse specialists, as well as more medical specialties—such as emergency medicine—which would be the first such training program in the country.

In addition to hands-on training, the curriculum includes lessons on social medicine and the root causes of disease, such as poverty, which have been part of PIH’s work since its early days in Haiti. The programs are designed to train and retain a new generation of doctors to the poor who work outside of Port-au-Prince, the traditional mecca for medical training.

“We envision a workforce of doctors, nurses, and other health professionals who are driven by medical excellence and committed to high-quality care for all Haitians,” said Michelle Morse, PIH deputy chief medical officer for Haiti. “The start of these residencies brings Haiti one step closer to this vision.”

Too little training, too few doctors

The American Medical Association describes the training for doctors in the United States as “lengthy.”

Four years of college. Four years at medical school. Up to seven years in a residency program and three years in a fellowship for specialists, who make up 95 percent of American doctors.

Add it up, and many doctors have had more than a decade of medical training. Much of it takes place through hands-on coaching from senior physicians in teaching hospitals with all the latest diagnostics and treatments.

In Haiti, one reason for needless sickness and death is the lack of trained professionals to provide health care. There are only 25 physicians per 100,000 Haitians. The United States has more than tenfold that number: 280 doctors for every 100,000 Americans.

In Haiti, half of doctors are generalists who have completed medical school and a social service year but no specialty training. Each year, about 450 graduating doctors compete for only about 150 residency positions.

Those residencies allow Haitian doctors to become specialists in fields such as internal medicine and pediatrics, but even those additional years of training are wanting. Most residencies are based in hospitals that are ill-equipped and under-staffed, with limited supervision by experienced doctors. Attending physicians are underpaid, leading many to spend their time in private practice, instead of teaching physician trainees.

PIH conducted a survey of Haitian residency programs to better understand the country's medical education needs. The survey found that 55 percent of residents don’t have Internet access at the hospitals where they work, and 80 percent of the programs do not have an exit exam for residents.

“These residencies are operating in hospitals that are severely short on resources, from staff to equipment,” Morse said. “University Hospital has electronic medical records, an emergency department, a CT scanner—it allows us to have a whole new level of quality care and training at a hospital with the appropriate resources.”

Double brain drain

The lack of opportunities leads many young Haitian doctors to seek training and employment in other countries, causing a brain drain in the health workforce. A staggering 80 percent of all physicians trained in Haiti leave within five years of graduation to practice abroad. Of the doctors who stay in Haiti, most practice in Port-au-Prince, which makes it difficult for rural people to access care. The medical education programs at University Hospital aim to slow or even reverse that double brain drain—from rural to Port-au-Prince or abroad—by encouraging talented young doctors to train in Haiti and stay there to practice medicine.

Dr. Ketly Altenor, 27, hopes to return to St. Marc, Haiti, to practice medicine. Growing up there, Altenor lost her father at 12 years old, and her mother supported the family as a street vendor. Despite her family’s poverty, Altenor excelled in school and earned a competitive spot at the state medical school. She graduated with the support of a scholarship from the nonprofit Haitian Education and Leadership Program, which provided housing, a stipend, and mentorship. She was accepted into the pediatrics residency at University Hospital after graduating from medical school.

“After my training I intend to return to work in my hometown, where there aren’t enough pediatricians,” Altenor said. “I will try to extend pediatric care to remote areas of the Artibonite region. I want to work in social medicine and really help people.”

Though University Hospital’s medical residencies are just starting, other training activities have occurred since the hospital opened. Since Farmer delivered his talk, or “grand rounds,” to inaugurate medical education at University Hospital, staff have participated in daily continuing education sessions to improve care, from training on using ultrasound to sessions to help faculty become better teachers.

As Farmer said, “University Hospital was built to be a teaching hospital because the hypothesis, here, is that the quality of medical care will be improved whenever training and research—the ‘feedback loops’ that allow us to learn—occur in tandem with compassionate care.”

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Jason Graber on October 11, 2013

International Medical Corps is Training the Next Generation of Haitian Health Care Workes

Gracieuse (left), Medina (middle right)
Gracieuse (left), Medina (middle right)

International Medical Corps, in partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP), supports a Multi-Purpose Health Worker training program at the Higher Institute of Health Leadership Training of Cayes. This program puts into place a standardized education system that is supported by the MSPP. The current program is located in Les Cayes which is located in the South Department region of Haiti. International Medical Corps’ program officer in the area interviewed six students about their future after participating in this training program that was launched last year. Below are the responses from the interviewed students:

While looking for work after graduating high school, Pierre found an announcement for a health officer training program in the newspaper. Pierre wanted to learn more about being a health officer before he joined the program, so he consulted his uncle who currently works as a health officer and could explain the duties of the job. After his conversation with his uncle, Pierre decided to enroll in the program. After he passed the training program’s entrance exam, he was confident that being a health officer could lead to a successful career. Pierre, whose personal motto was “health for all”, wished to help the people in his community who are suffering from behavioral issues.  

Pierre did very well in school, and said that the key to achieving good grades was to study very hard every day. Ultimately, his goal is to attain a master’s degree in community health and health education pending completion of his training as a health officer. For Pierre, the health officer training program provides an excellent opportunity to develop a meaningful career directly out of high school, because approximately 90% of the trainees from this program find work in their local communities. Given current economic conditions, Pierre is a little concerned about the ability of the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) to continue to place such a high proportion of graduating students in the health system. However, he remains confident in his decision to pursue this training because the program will endow him with the skills necessary to be compliant with national health standards. Pierre is determined to achieve success in his career by the age of 30 and says, “A health officer career will provide for the needs of my family in the future.” He continues by stating that “Decentralization of the program is also good idea for the welfare of students.”

Two of the young ladies in the health officer training program talked about how they felt about the program and their desired outcome of their participation:

Gracieuse learned about the health officer training program from a friend. She was most interested in the aspects of the program regarding housing, nutrition, transportation and the formation and delivery of training materials. Gracieuse believes the program will ultimately benefit the entire country of Haiti. She hopes to apply the skills learned in this program to benefit the general population, with support from the government. When asked about what she sees in the future for the program, Gracieuse replied: “Given the economic situation, I am concerned for the future of the program, however, I intend to perform the job of health officer as necessary to improve our community and our lives.”

Medina also learned about the health officer training program through a friend that attended the first run of classes. When she first enrolled in the program, Medina was worried that the training program would teach her some basic skills and then leave her without support. After spending more time in the program, she now believes that it will allow her to teach people in her community to take control of their health while keeping her supported as she becomes acustomed to her new profession. When asked what she will do after classes end, Melinda said “I will continue to use the concepts to preserve my health, the health of my family and my community as a whole. If the program is delivered as intended, we can improve the health of ourselves and our community. I plan to use my education to provide effective services to the community for health promotion and disease prevention.”

Mackenson first heard about the health officer training program through radio commercials. Wanting to hear more about the program, he contacted a recent graduate to ask them about the training and the careers it can lead to. At first, Mackenson thought that he would only receive enough financial and material support to meet the training requirements for the position of health officer. Now he believes that the health officer program and its focus on improving the entire Haitian healthcare system is good initiative that will not only benefit him as an individual, but the community as a whole.

When asked what he will do after classes have ended, Mackenson replied that he wants to be hired quickly so he can apply the concepts he learned in the program. He believes that educating people about essential health topics will be beneficial to the population, because they will be able to protect themselves against diseases related to the environment (e.g. diarrhea, cholera, etc.) and act to remedy factors that may affect their health negatively. Mackenson stated, “In my opinion, this program will allow me to have the means to meet my needs, support my family and help others who are vulnerable. I will use my skills, knowledge and expertise to serve the community to which I am assigned.”

Jean first heard of the health officer training program through a poster from the Ministry of Public Health. For Jean, this program seemed to offer skill training that is critical to the health of individuals and ultimately the community in general. He said “At the end of this program, I will enter the labor market and demonstrate the knowledge I have acquired by serving the community.” Jean hopes that the Ministry of Health will achieve the objectives of this program. “People in the community need our presence so that they can learn basic concepts of hygiene and safeguard their health,” Jean explained. “Health is a right that must be preserved. I will work with the community to promote health education and teach the basic principles of hygiene. Eventually, I hope to become an expert in that subject.”

Genel learned about the health officer program through a friend. He first thought that this program would be identical to many other training programs, but he now believes that this program has the ability to address most of the existing problems facing the country in regards to environmentally spread communicable diseases. He hopes that all the students currently in the program are able to find work in the public health sector. When asked how he saw this program’s future, he replied: “The program will change the point of view of many in regards to health, and the community will be less affected by epidemics. After I graduate from the program, I will be ready to serve the entire Haitian population; my knowledge and skills will help people take charge of their health by taking into account their environment.” 

Mackenson in class
Mackenson in class
Mackenson presenting to the class
Mackenson presenting to the class
Jean addressing the class
Jean addressing the class
Genel working with a classmate
Genel working with a classmate
Pierre and his instructor
Pierre and his instructor

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on October 07, 2013

VIDA Navigating Turbulent Waters in Aiding Haiti

VIDA is navigating turbulent waters to aid Haiti. VIDA ‘s shipment to St. Damien Hospital the premier pediatric hospital in Haiti that provides all services free of charge is currently being held in a Miami warehouse awaiting final customs approval. The container is sponsored by our shipping partner Otis McAllister and is carrying 12 pallets of medical supplies including patient gowns, surgical gowns, exam gloves, surgical gloves, surgical kits and a sundry of patient care items. Included in the shipment is one pallet of sterile surgical gloves valued at over $50,000.   

For the past three years, VIDA has embarked on a grassroots strategy to bring medical aid to the poorest areas of Haiti. VIDA’s project in Cayes Jacmel, managed byHaitian born physician, Alix J.Magloir. Dr. Alix has been providing critical care to  thousands residents with the aid of VIDA.  Dr. Magloir will be taking another trip in early November to the project, carrying over 80 boxes of medical supplies donated by VIDA and made possible by your generous support. Over the past two years, the government has tightened the regulations for donated aid.  As a result, the process to ship large containers of aid has become more complex and time consuming. One such exampleis the new requirement that the shipment’s inventory contain the manufacturing date and manufacturers location ( in addition to the expiration date which VIDA already provides) of every item in the shipment. This has significantly increased the inventorying of products and in some cases has eliminated certain products from being sent.  However, we are happy to say that VIDA is committed to supplying this project and will continue to supply physician and community groups travelling to Haiti on a monthly basis to provide healthcare to the poor.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Jenn Eason on September 17, 2013

Creating jobs changes lives!

Sunrise over Fonfrede, Haiti
Sunrise over Fonfrede, Haiti

Greetings from BEAUTIFUL Haiti!

 I have had the privilege of living here for the past 3+ months. Residing in Haiti full time certainly has changed my perspective on Haitian development and aid. The perspective I had previously from short trips a week at a time is very different from the reality of living here. But one thing remains, Hope is alive and well in Haiti! This country is Beautiful, not just because of sunsets and sunrises blanketed with high mountains and palm trees or a calendar worthy deserted beach with gently lapping waves… but because the people make it so. Haitians are, by nature, giving, kind, congenial and hard working.

After the earthquake, amidst the chaos, the temporary fix was mass handouts. This was necessary and important for short-term survival, but that time has long since passed. Haitians want and need jobs. With unemployment as high as 80% in some parts of the country, Haitians are looking for training. They want to earn the right to provide for their families, to have a sense of dignity. The focus now for most organizations is long-term sustainability. How does this happen? Providing training and jobs. Haitians are eager to learn and excited to put to practice what they’ve learned.

I spent an afternoon with International Disaster Volunteers and their students at the English in Mind English school. They are a fun bunch if I’ve ever seen one. They are serious about learning English and they have a great time doing it. They incorporate songs, stories and a lot of laughing. This was a refreshing site visit for me because the students wanted to have a Q&A session with me. It was so much fun letting them pick my brain (as they proudly referred to it in English idiom) and allow me to ask questions. They ended the session by asking what advice I would give Haiti regarding “the changes that need to be made”. My reply was simple. We have an America, we have Germany, France, England, et al… We don’t need another one. But we do need a strong Haiti. Make the changes that need to be made regarding infrastructure of the country, but don’t let it change who you are as a culture.

 REBUILDGlobally is another such organization making super cool flip-flops out of trash tires. They are providing jobs for locals in and around Port au Prince. Many of the men and women working there have been able to take their kids back from poverty orphan care, buy land and move their families from tent cities to a new home. More over, 2 of the employees have been promoted from shoemakers to manager of operations and manager of the local sales store. The men and women were provided training and are now teaching others what they’ve learned.

 Hats off to the men and women of Haiti and the visiting NGO’s working hard to preserve a culture while advancing an economy!! Keep up the good work! 

Paradise beach, Labadee, Haiti
Paradise beach, Labadee, Haiti
Advanced
Advanced 'English in Mind' class
The
The 'Jolina' flip-flop made by... Jolina!

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on September 17, 2013

4-Day Training with Grassroots Leaders in Hait

Training participants
Training participants

This last week, Lambi Fund staff members convened an annual 4-day long conference in the Artibonite region of Haiti.  In all, 36 grassroots leaders from 9 organizations were in attendance.  This intensive training covered a number of important topics including – civil education, human rights, gender equity and how to lead organizations that are democratic and inclusive.  Quite a bit on the agenda for just four days!

Some of the participants’ thoughts on the training include:

“This training was especially important in regards to gender equity.  I don’t have a family yet, but now I know how I should balance my family when I do,” said a young female member of the grassroots organization ACHVRO.

Of the training, an elder member replied, “It was especially important on the level of civic education, because in school, they used to dictate what was taught to you and couldn’t explain or clarify most things.  I’m grateful to now know our role and responsibilities as citizens….and this has allowed us to understand certain advantages and disadvantages in society.”

Another young Haitian woman said, “Before, I didn’t know anything about gender equity, now I know a little bit more about balancing men and women in society.”

Finally, a member of OPMO assessed, “These past few days gave us the frame of reference to understand today’s reality.”

It was incredibly rewarding to watch program partners work together in groups, discuss issues in their communities and learn more about their roles in society.  Many have received little or no formal education, so learning about their rights as citizens and humans beings was a first for most.  Leaving the training, participants were eager to work together to strengthen their communities and their work.

In order to make these efforts more impactful, Lambi Fund staff taught the grassroots leaders strategies that they could use to strengthen their organizations’ capacities, how to lead effective meetings and how to use the strength of its members to impact significant change in their communities and country.

It was a whirlwind of a week!

Working during a group session
Working during a group session

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Steve Bostian on October 28, 2013

October 2013 Update

 

Government Relations - Our productive partnership with DINEPA
 
Many people who know about Haiti or who have worked in Haiti are aware of chronic problems with the Haitian government - inefficiency, corruption, violent elections and coups, etc.   However, we are happy to report that we have enjoyed a very positive and productive relationship with DINEPA, the Haitian Ministry of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene.    Partly due to the fact that it is a relatively new and small department, DINEPA is very focused on its mission and has been able avoid corruption.

In 2011, DINEPA ordered 500,000 bottles of our Gadyen Dlo brand chlorine as part of their national response plan to the cholera epidemic.   We helped with distributions in three departments (like states) and also have participated in their WASH (Water, Sanitation Hygiene) Cluster meetings.   Our Bucket of Life system is recommended and supported by DINEPA due to chlorine treatment being a key pillar of their national water and sanitation strategy.

 

Annual Campaign back in full swing! 
Hits September goal of 50% mark
 
That's a small price to pay to provide clean life-saving water in Haiti!
 
And don't forget you now have a unique opportunity to leverage your investment by more than five to one.   That's because the UNICEF grant requires a "match" of only $51,000 in order to receive the $239,000.
 
Major Bucket of Life Distribution 
In coordination with U.N. Peacekeepers
 
A local organization, with funding from the UN peacekeeping mission (MINUSTAH), purchased 2,700 Buckets of Life.
 
They coordinated a training for over 50 individuals in hygiene promotion and cholera prevention.  Representatives from Deep Springs as well as the Ministry of Health gave the presentations during the training.  These individuals then identified families in Chansolme and Bassin Bleu to receive the Buckets of Life and trained families on the use of the system. 
 
Logistics support for the bucket distribution was provided by MINUSTAH.   Our team for the Northwest Department, based in Jolivert, will serve families to handle their ongoing needs forGadyen Dlo brand chlorine and support.
 

 

 

Aqwalife Partnership 
New $10,000 project in Leogane Commune
 
 
 
Aqwalife was founded by Venkee Sharma, CEO of Aquatech, a leading water and wastewater treatment company based in Canonsburg, PA.  Venkee established Aqwalife in memory of his father Prem Sharma, founder of Aquatech, and as a means for the company and others to support clean water projects for the poor around the world.   Our partnership with Aqwalife will focus on serving over 6,000 people in the Leogane Commune of Haiti.   This exciting partnership was announced recently at the Aqwalife Golf Classic.
 
 
Team LANXESS (L to R)
Keith Papich - LANXESS
Joe Bonazza - Severn Trent Services 
Jeff Ritter - LANXESS & Deep Springs Board Member 
Alex Lackner - Water Economy Network
 
CINCH 
Central Indiana Churches for Haiti
 
CINCH is a coalition of churches in Indiana who are committed to Haiti.  They meet annually and this year's gathering was at Saint Thomas Aquinas Church in West Lafayette.   Many of these churches partner with Deep Springs to provide clean water for their "adopted" communities where they have a sister church relationship.   Michael Ritter provided the annual update at CINCH on October 6th.   If you live in Indiana and would like to attend next year, contact Jeff Newellat jnewell@ball-law.com
 
In spite of decades of political turmoil and natural disasters in Haiti, one institution is constant - The Church.   80% of Haitians claim a Roman Catholic affiliation and 16% affiliate with Protestant denominations, so church has always been a key local pillar of the community.   By partnering with local churches, we not only secure the few physical meeting places in rural communities, but we meet trusted leaders who could become valuable members of the Deep Springs team.   We continue to add church partners, both in Haiti and in the U.S.  Thanks to the churches in Indiana for their strong commitment to walk hand in hand with their Haitian brothers and sisters!

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Steve Bostian on August 02, 2013

2nd Quarter 2013 Update

Annual Campaign Launched
Lead Gift of $239,000 pledged!
 
Soon after launching our 2013 Campaign in late May, we got the very exciting news that an international organization has committed to a $239,000 project.   This was more than double the $100,000 that we had planned for the top campaign donation - and really propels us quickly towards our goal of $650,000!

 If you or your company or organization have not yet had time to respond, please contact us at your earliest convenience.
 
To discuss campaign options (including PR options for organizations), please contact Development Director Steve Bostian at 828.773.7242.   Make an online donation with option of monthly or quarterly gifts or contact us at partnership@deepspringsinternational.org to get a copy of the pledge form and pledge reminder emailed to you.


Water Economy Network selects Deep Springs as official Global Partner
 

The Water Economy Network – WEN - is a new Western PA regional organization that helps water sector stakeholders access water-sector business opportunities, encourages start-up company formation through innovative technology development and deployment, and attracts both national and international water related industry to the region.
 
As WEN developed, they realized that their impact can be more than just regional.   As they bring water industries to Western PA, they will have a national influence.    But extending even further, WEN can use its expertise and resources to have a global impact.   Recently they selected Deep Springs International because it is an organization birthed out of Grove City College which has strong connections with Pittsburgh and the region.  

By having an official Global Partner, WEN can help Network Members also develop Corporate Social Responsibility programs that include global impact.  We are excited about this new opportunity and look forward to working with the companies of the Water Economy Network!


Did You Know....?
 
HAITI FACT

More than 10% of Haitian children die before the age of 5.

WATER FACT

Half of the world's hospital beds are occupied with people with an easily preventable waterborne disease; such as typhoid, cholera and dysentery.
(foodandwaterwatch.org)
 
National Leadership Conference a Success

From May 9 to 10, the leaders of Deep Springs convened in Leogane for two days of training, planning and strategizing.  Leaders came from all corners of Haiti: Jolivert, Leogane, Milot, Plaine du Nord and Fonds Verrettes.
    
Some of the activities and topics included: a review of last year's achievements, new innnovations, monitoring methods, sales management techniques, review of recent research, and options for new products.
 
Goal-setting was done at the national, regional, and personal levels, using a new methodology.   The staff was excited to learn that one of their own (Madame Eveline) will be receiving the coveted Gangarosa Sustainability Award.
 
The team in Haiti is very committed to improving health nationwide through production and distribution of the local Gadyen Dlo brand chlorine and our Buckets of Life .  It was very exciting to hear them express their desire to see every family in their country helped through proper water treatment!

 

The Buckets are Here!


We are so excited to be launching our new program, Buckets of Life!   At just $34, this is a simple and affordable way for individuals, families, and even groups like classes, scout troops, etc. to help struggling families with water purification systems they need to improve their health.
 
So start saving those pennies... because it only cost 3 cents a day to provide safe water for a family!!!

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on July 30, 2013

PIH Haiti Earthquake Recovery - July 2013 Update

Rebecca E. Rollins/Partners In Health
Rebecca E. Rollins/Partners In Health

University Hospital Shows that Aid Done Right in Haiti Improves Lives

This essay from PIH's Stephanie Garry originally apperared in the Tampa Bay Times. 

The gleaming white hospital appears out of nowhere in the bustle of this impoverished city in the Central Plateau of Haiti.

It seems even more out of place when you consider what's inside: 300 beds — more than All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg. Six operating rooms. A neonatal intensive care unit. A CT scanner, the only one available to the public in Haiti. Most important, patients. More than 10,000 have seen clinicians since the hospital opened this spring.

It's one of the few visible signs of progress since the 2010 earthquake leveled Port-au-Prince.

More than half of American households donated after the earthquake to help a poor country with bad luck. But for the most part, the grand plans of building back better have not materialized. The 1.5 million people living in tents after the earthquake are fewer, but many were forcibly evicted. A garment factory and a luxury hotel, both underwritten by aid, opened with fanfare. These milestones hardly amount to a resounding victory for the people of Haiti.

Against this disappointing effort, University Hospital stands out as a testament to how much can be accomplished in Haiti. It can teach us how to achieve rebuilding and development with effective aid that endures, and better deliver on the generosity of the American people.

The popular narrative would tell you the recovery fell short because Haiti is difficult, unstable, dangerous and corrupt. Just a few days after the quake, New York Times columnist David Brooks blamed Haiti's trouble on "progress-resistant cultural influences." It's a facile explanation of a complex place, but a lot of people found it convincing.

My experience has led me to believe something else. I lived in Port-au-Prince for nine months and now work in Boston at Partners In Health, the global health nonprofit that built L'hopital Universitaire de Mirebalais under the guidance of Brooksville native Dr. Paul Farmer. In my view, the problem lay not with the Haitians but the aid industry that came to their rescue.

The earthquake recovery was largely composed of nonprofit organizations that are more eager to please donors than the people they purport to serve. Too often, they pay lip service to working with communities while largely ignoring them in designing their programs. Many of the so-called experts on alleviating poverty had little experience in Haiti and no plans to stay long term.

I saw this firsthand during my time working for Fonkoze, an exceptional Haitian microfinance bank serving the rural poor. I attended an aid organization's workshop to create a website to help poor, rural people improve their lives with information — people who are mostly illiterate and lack access to electricity, computers and the Internet. I heard an American aid worker complaining that the luxury housing provided by her nonprofit employer didn't have enough style.

It seemed like so much money went to Haiti after the earthquake, but less than 1 percent of the $2.4 billion in immediate earthquake relief went directly to the government of Haiti.

In the longer-term recovery effort, the U.S. development agency USAID spent $1.15 billion, more than half going to American firms in the D.C. area and less than 1 percent to Haitian firms and nonprofits, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

Haitians weren't in charge of the projects, but they shoulder the blame for failures. Their country is characterized as a black hole for aid.

If national systems are weak, diverting money and projects away from the government only worsens the problem. It isn't easy to work with a government that is chronically short of resources, but it's the only way to strengthen the public sector to ensure the rights of its citizens.

There are many problems with the way aid works, but at the root of it is how we view the poor and disadvantaged, and more broadly, any group of people we seek to serve.

Beneath the complexity of actors and projects, the core of the problem is a misinterpretation of poverty.

As well intentioned as they can be, both aid and charity take the subtle view that there is something inherently wrong with the people being served. Otherwise, the argument goes, why would they need our help?

In reality, disadvantaged people are systematically deprived of the basic rights that would enable them to rise out of poverty — food, clean water, decent sanitation, housing, jobs, health care and education. The ambitions of aid are often too small, focusing on modest, short-term interventions instead of the long, painstaking work of building systems to ensure rights, in partnership with the government and local institutions.

In Haiti, this denial of rights is not innocent, but the result of centuries of international interference and oppression. A couple of recent examples: Just a decade ago, on claims that Haiti's government was interfering with the elections of eight senators, the United States blocked international loans to improve water and sanitation systems. In 2010, less than a year after the earthquake, a U.N. peacekeeping force inadvertently brought an epidemic of cholera to Haiti by dumping its sewage in a major river system. Cholera has since killed more than 8,000 people and sickened more than one in 20 Haitians.

Instead of fixating on personal failings of the people of Haiti, we should work with them to build systems that ensure access to education, health care and food. The rights-based approach guides us to imagine doing more than offering castoff goods and services — the XXL T-shirts or the expired medicines or the spring break service trips. Pragmatically, a human rights approach works better because it confronts difficult, interconnected problems with significant solutions, not small, cheap interventions like chlorine for purifying drinking water or transitional shelters that, by themselves, offer little hope of lasting change.

Partners In Health, along with its sister organization, Zanmi Lasante, works to improve the quality of care in the public health system, collaborating with Haitian communities and the government to train health care workers, develop new services and improve rundown facilities, including building top-quality infrastructure.

In the case of University Hospital, the Haitian government identified the need for a national teaching hospital after the earthquake, and Partners In Health/Zamni Lasante worked alongside the Haitian Ministry of Health to design and construct the $17 million facility, with the help of many in-kind donations. Through a public-private partnership, the government and Partners In Health/Zamni Lasante will contribute to operating costs, and management of the hospital will gradually transition to the government over the next 10 years.

Partners In Health builds open-ended partnerships that don't end when the earthquake donations dry up, offering a greater chance at slow, lasting progress on entrenched problems of poverty and inequality. We call this "accompaniment," to convey a shared journey.

Developing partnerships based on empathy and pragmatic solidarity — not pity or even sympathy — is the essential first step in serving people in need.

Early on May 23, nurses and doctors dressed in blue scrubs and prepared for University Hospital's first surgical case. The instruments were sterilized, positive air pressure minimized the risk of infection, and Haitian nurses provided anesthesia. Dozens of partners — corporations, generous donors of time and money, medical professionals, and Mirebalais housekeepers — had worked together to make this day a reality. It wouldn't have been possible without years of work to strengthen the health system in the Central Plateau, so that patients could be connected to care from their homes to the hospital.

The patient was a 60-year-old Haitian woman and mother of four, diagnosed with breast cancer by a Haitian doctor. A Haitian surgeon from Mirebalais and his American counterpart worked side by side in a fully equipped operating room to perform the mastectomy. As with all work at University Hospital, procedures like this serve two purposes — first, and most important, to heal the patient with a standard of care that compares to a top-quality teaching hospital anywhere else in the world, and second, to train Haitian medical professionals to provide that kind of care. With this operation, the Haitian woman has received new hope and a greater chance of living longer with a better quality of life.

In the United States, there would be no question that a woman with breast cancer receives care — including a mastectomy — to save her life, and health facilities provide it routinely. Yet development experts debate whether this care is worth the cost in low-income countries. Should we spend the money on and invest the time in systems, with the necessary infrastructure, equipment, supply chains and drugs, to treat complex cases like cancer?

The patients in need of care and their doctors always say yes. Our role is to support them.

University Hospital was built in less than three years, long enough for the majority of earthquake responders to come and go. It will remain, serving the people of Haiti long into the future, as a testament to how much can be accomplished when you view the people you seek to help as equal partners.

Stephanie Garry is a former Tampa Bay Times staff writer who served in the Peace Corps in the Dominican Republic from 2009 to 2011. In 2011, she worked for Fonkoze in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, before joining the Partners In Health staff in Boston. Views are her own.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By C. Latifi on July 18, 2013

Strengthening Heath Systems in Haiti

Three and a half years after the earthquake that devastated Port-au-Prince and the surrounding region, International Medical Corps continues its work to support health system strengthening in Haiti.

With International Medical Corps, the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) is piloting the “Agents de Santé Polyvalent,” or Multi-Purpose Health Worker, Program. This program replaces the previous mix of community-health worker initiatives from the government and various NGOs, putting in place a standardized education system supported by MSPP.

The current pilot program is located Les Cayes, a small city in the South Department. The program provides an intense and rigorous education program for the 29 participants from the region over the course of two years.

The first thirteen weeks of the program consist of lectures and presentations covering mathematics, physics, chemistry, communication, precautions, infection control, personal hygiene, community hygiene, environmental health, ethics and conduct, and community diagnosis. Following the lecture component, students then go to the field to practice what they have learned under supervision of MSPP staff.

As a part of this field visit, students must assess the community to determine what health issues exist. Following this assessment, they return to the community to provide information on the issues they encountered, including education on hygiene promotion and environmental hygiene.

International Medical Corps is proud to support MSPP and the future “Agents de Santé Polyvalent.” The Haitian government aims to eventually roll this program out countrywide, providing one health officer for every 1,000 Haitian people.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on June 21, 2013

Seven New Projects Launched in 2013

A training workshop for partner organizations
A training workshop for partner organizations

So far, in 2013, seven new Lambi Fund of Haiti projects have been launched.  These are exciting initiatives that are uniting communities and producing income generating activities in Haiti.

Three community credit funds were recently launched.  These are creating access to affordable loans for members of grassroots organizations.  The loans are being used by small merchants and farmers to invest in their crops and buy goods for their businesses.   Additionally, Lambi Fund is training organization members how to manage the credit fund, maintain bookkeeping, and issue loans to its members.  Once the loans are repaid, the money will replenish the credit fund and the organizations will have even more money to issue loans to even more of its members.

Another exciting effort is a coffee production project launched in partnership with the Cooperative of Agricultural Coffee Growers of Kalavil (KAPKAK).  Here, Lambi Fund is providing the seeds, tools and training necessary to expand this coffee cooperative’s capacity to produce high-quality coffee beans.

The Peasant Movement of Charbe (MPC) is working with Lambi Fund to plant 60,000 fruit and forest trees in their community.  They are receiving training on seedling production, reforestation, and composting.  MPC members are also working to build two tree nurseries.

Another new project recently launched is an ox-plow service with The Society for Agricultural Development of Nip (SADN).  Lambi Fund is providing the resources needed to purchase six oxen and three plows.  Following training on how to manage and operate an ox-plow service, this service will affordably plow locals’ fields, which are now currently being plowed by hand.

The final project launched in 2013 so far, is a goat breeding project with The Three Mangoes Peasant Organization for Development (OPDTM).  Lambi Fund is working with OPDTM to purchase 50 female and 5 male breeding goats and providing technical training in animal husbandry.  Currently, the organization is working to build shelters for the animals, fenced in grazing areas and gardens to grow feed.

Each of these new projects are exciting initiatives that are strengthening grassroots organizations’ capacities in their communities and creating opportunities for income producing activities.  As the projects evolve, Lambi Fund will have updates on their progress, struggles they face along the way and the impact they are making in their communities. 

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Gina Herakovic on June 05, 2013

3 Years Later

Flooding in Haiti from Hurricane Sandy
Flooding in Haiti from Hurricane Sandy

Dear GlobalGivers,

Sometimes it seems as though the natural disasters in Haiti will not stop. From the horrendous earthquake that struck more than 3 years ago to the massive flooding caused by Hurricane Sandy and most recently, regional droughts that have hindered planting and harvesting efforts. Yet there is hope. With your support, organizations such as the Lambi Fund and Partners in Health have been able to continue their work in capacity building.

Farming is difficult in Haiti as a result of the unpredictable weather leaving much of the land either flooded or barren. The Lambi Fund works with local organizations so that farmers are no longer at the mercy of the land. Resources such as irrigation canals and water pumps help the people cope with current weather situations while relief grants provide the people with seed and fertilizer. Not only does this help them get back on their feet, but they can also store food and grain for when future storms or droughts hit.

 A member of the local organization AFDL explained that, “Before relief funding from Lambi Fund came, people weren’t sure when they could plant and harvest again. This was a major concern for everyone. The Lambi Fund of Haiti helped us till the land again…we have gardens again. The emergency relief was an opportunity for us. Hurricane Sandy came during planting season and we weren’t sure how we were going to repair the land. With Lambi Fund’s support, we re-tilled the land and planted again. Now we have corn, nuts, and black beans and harvesting has begun.”

Partners in Health is also helping to provide critically needed resources, one of the most important being electricity. Having recently finished the construction of a national teaching hospital, Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais (HUM), they’re now working on sustainable solutions to keep it up and running. Across the roof of the 200,000 square foot hospital are 1,800 solar panels meticulously arranged in order to produce more energy than HUM will consume. To put this into perspective, before the hospital was even open to the public, these solar panels produced 139 megawatt hours of electricity. This is enough energy to charge 22 MILLION smartphones, and offset 72 tons of coal and more than 140,000 pounds of carbon emissions. Using solar energy is expected to cut $379,000 from HUM’s projected annual operating costs. The environmental and financial benefits that these solar panels provide for Haiti are countless!

While you may only see heart wrenching stories about the people in Haiti on the news, there are so many more stories of hope and joy. This is why we provide you with these reports so that you can read about the inspiring things our partner organizations are doing on the ground. It is because of the support from donors like you that these organizations can continue their groundbreaking and catalyzing work.

One such story of hope comes from a Haitian doctor working with International Medical Corps. Raised in Port-au-Prince and the second child of four, Virginia was a witness to Haiti’s extreme poverty. The lack of health care and large inequalities struck a chord in her which solidified her decision to earn her medical degree.  The earthquake hit when Virginia was still in her residency in the southern part of Haiti. She rushed back to Port-au-Prince to find her family who thankfully were unharmed. Yet being a doctor could not have prepared her for what she saw. Patients “without hands and legs; with broken eyes” and the crumbled streets “smelled dead.”

Life circled around survival. There was a constant flow of patients coming to her, begging and pleading for help. Her mind was “without energy.” She returned south to treat victims, yet everyone was always on high alert. Explains Virginia, “you just keep wondering when something will happen.” This psychological impact ran deep in the Haitian people’s minds. The survivors constantly wondered why they were alive when their family and country was in ruins. But Virginia refused to give up. “You have to fight – with everything you have. Otherwise, you will lose your mind.”

After finishing her residency, she applied for many jobs in Port-au-Prince, but found nothing. She expanded her search to areas outside the capitol and was flooded with responses from several NGOs including International Medical Corps. The match between IMC and Virginia was perfect. After one month, she became the supervisor of one IMC site, and then another, until finally her work took her back to Port-au-Prince. She constantly moved up in the organization where today, she is a capacity building manager. She says she sometimes does miss patient contact, but she knows that she is “helping lay the groundwork for more.”

Virginia describes her work: “If you work in a clinic, you may deliver a beautiful baby girl. But I get to fight for something else: to have more health facilities where women can give birth safely and hygienically, more trained OB/GYNs; places where a mother can take her child if it has disabilities.”

Today, Virginia believes that the earthquake literally shook Haiti to move forward, to rebuild in a more equal and sustainable way. “I think the earthquake brought something to us. We started to realize that the way we used to live was not correct, and that we have to integrate into the world. If every Haitian can think like this, I think that everything that happened to us will serve to progress us; to bring something different for the next generation. There is a lesson. We have to push to enter into life; to not be separate.”

Without your help, these inspiring stories from our partner organizations would be far and few. Every donation makes a difference and helps tell a story. From us at GlobalGiving to Haitian nationals like Virginia, we thank you for your support from the bottom of our hearts.

Mirebalais Teaching Hospital Solar Panels
Mirebalais Teaching Hospital Solar Panels
Dr. Virginia Chevalier
Dr. Virginia Chevalier

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on June 03, 2013

VIDA Launches New Project in Haiti

VIDA is working on our June 2013 shipment to Haiti with our shipping partner Otis McAllister to benefit our new partner St. Damien Hospital the premier pediatric hospital in Haiti that provides all services free of charge.  St. Damien’s provides high quality medical treatment for disadvantaged and sick children in Haiti. More than half of all patients are admitted for an infectious disease such as tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV while twenty-five percent are admitted for non-infectious diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and kidney infection. Most patients admitted are also malnourished.  The outpatient clinic treats 100 children daily, for acute, parasitic, and bacterial infections. In specialized clinics, chronic conditions such as sickle cell anemia, congenital heart diseases (CHD), tuberculosis and cancer are treated for months or years if needed. St. Damien Pediatric Hospital and associated public health programs of NPFS reach over 30,000 children annually. St. Damien’s Hospital has 120 beds, including an 18 bed emergency unit,10 bed pediatric intensive care unit, and 9 bed cancer center.  The shipment will contain $500,000 in critical medical supplies including patient gowns, exam gloves, syringes, surgical kits and a large assortment of patient care supplies.

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Steve Bostian on May 15, 2013

1st Quarter 2013 UPDATE

acted
acted

We are continuing our efforts to provide clean water for 900,000 rural Haitians families who are without

Some recent accomplishments include:

  • Launch of Buckets of Life Program
  • Celebration of World Water Day 2013 - International Year of Water Cooperation with over 250 attendees
  • Successful partnership with French organization ACTED, which includes distribution of Buckets of Life and training for over 500 families, and the addition of 7 new Health Agents who work directly with Haitians providing on-going support
  • Participation in "Global Health and Entrepreneurship" conference in Boston, MA providing networking, collaboration and future partnership opportunities

Earth Day

The recent celebration of Earth Day was an opportunity to bring the importance of abundant, potable water center stage. Most people believe that pollution is the main source of concern, but in fact, in countries like Haiti, deforestation has the most devastating impact. Most rural Haitians still cut trees to produce charcoal for cooking, the primary cause of deforestation in the past 50 years.

Our primary focus in Haiti is to make sure families & individuals have access to clean, safe water, but we also collaborate with other initiatives to educate Haitians on the importance of trees and their impact on rainfall, vegetation and topsoil.

Deeps Springs is supportive of all reforestation projects in Haiti, recognizing this as a key step in helping Haitians stabilize their water sources.

Health Agents Excelling in Haiti

Our supervisors in Northern Haiti recently met with the 21 Health Agents in the Plaine du Nord region. These Agents work jointly for Deep Springs and the Haitian Ministry of Health. To the supervisors’ delight, they learned that these Health Agents are so motivated to help save lives and improve health that they have been going the extra mile.

They have been holding community meetings with families they are not required to visit as part of their Ministry of Health responsibilities. It is this personal commitment that will enable us to reach all 900,000 families who lack clean water in rural Haiti. The demand is so great that the Agents recently ran out of our bucket systems!

 
Boys excited about Buckets of Life delivery
Boys excited about Buckets of Life delivery

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on May 03, 2013

PIH Haiti Earthquake Recovery - May 2013 update

Mirebalais National Teaching Hospital Turns on the Lights—Sustainably

Since the earthquake, Partners In Health (PIH) has focused on rebuilding the damaged healthcare and health education systems in Haiti in partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Health. Constructing and opening a new national teaching hospital, Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais (HUM), was one huge step towards achieving this goal, and PIH is proud to share how this vision is now a sustainable reality. 

It’s among the most basic, most critical, and most overlooked resources needed to run a hospital: electricity. But in Haiti’s Central Plateau, the flow of electricity is intermittent at best. Consider that in Mirebalais, located 30 miles north of Port-au-Prince, the power goes out for an average of three hours each day. This poses an enormous challenge to running any hospital: surgeries are jeopardized, neonatal ventilators stall, the cold chain is interrupted, and countless everyday tasks get derailed. As Partners In Health co-founder Paul Farmer noted at a recent lecture at the Harvard School of Public Health, “It’s not great if you’re a surgeon and you have to think about getting the generator going.”

To ensure patients and staff at HUM weren’t left in the dark when the 300-bed hospital opened in March, PIH and its partners looked toward the sun. Stretched across the roof of the new 200,000-square-foot hospital is a vast and meticulously arranged array of 1,800 solar panels.

On a bright day, these panels are expected to produce more energy than the hospital will consume. Before the hospital even opened, the system churned out 139 megawatt hours of electricity, enough to charge 22 million smartphones and offset 72 tons of coal. Perhaps most important is that the excess electricity will be fed back into Haiti’s national grid, giving a much-needed boost to the country’s woefully inadequate energy infrastructure.

 “At each step of the way, we were attempting things that had never before been done in Haiti,” said Jim Ansara, volunteer HUM director of design and construction and a longtime PIH supporter. In a country ravaged by deforestation, the benefit to the environment cannot be overstated: HUM’s solar array has already offset more than 140,000 pounds of carbon emissions. Annually, the system is expected to save 210 metric tons of carbon emissions.

The system also carries a financial benefit. In Haiti, electricity is six times as expensive as in New England: the price per kilowatt hour is 35 cents, compared with 5.5 cents in New England. Using solar energy is expected to slash $379,000 from HUM’s projected annual operating costs. It’s also estimated that, overall, the hospital will create 800 jobs for Haitians. When fully operational, HUM is expected to be the largest solar-powered hospital in the world that produces more than 100 percent of its energy during peak daylight hours.


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Haiti Water Relief

By Kevin Adams on April 30, 2013

Cholera Update from the Government of Haiti

Here is an excerpt from a report published by the Government of Haiti published on February 28, 2013 titled The National Plan for the Elimination of Cholera in Haiti 2013-2022

 

According to Dr. Florence F. Guillaume, the Minister of Public Health and Population in Haiti, “On the second anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti, the international community determined that it was time to put an end to the scourge of cholera through short- and long-term actions to help the people of Haiti and the Dominican Republic combat this pandemic.  In light of this concern, the presidents of Haiti and the Dominican Republic on 11 January 2012 joined the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization PAHO/WHO, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to launch an appeal to mobilize major investments in water supply and sanitation with the aim of eliminating cholera from the island of Hispaniola.

 

The Call to Action for a Cholera-Free Hispaniola has been supported technically by PAHO/WHO, UNICEF, and the CDC in collaboration with the governments of Haiti and the Dominican Republic.  The immediate goal is to prevent cholera from becoming endemic on the island of Hispaniola. The elimination of cholera from the island entails interrupting its transmission.  However, because the bacteria are in the environment, sporadic cases will always be detected. 

 

As part of the Call to Action, representatives from PAHO/WHO and UNICEF are requesting donor countries and organizations to finance investments, and to meet the commitments made to Haiti following the earthquake of January 2010, with new funds specifically directed toward the construction of water supply and sanitation infrastructure.  These investments are necessary to raise Haiti’s level of access to potable water and sanitation to the levels of neighboring countries.

 

You can read the full report from the Haitian government at http://reliefweb.int/report/haiti/national-plan-elimination-cholera-haiti-2013-2022

 

WaterBrick International will continue its distribution of WaterBrick containers to Cholera Treatment Centers in Haiti to combat the spread of Cholera.  WaterBrick containers are being used as a safe water intervention container of choice for clean water and food storage. 

 

Feel free to call us at 877-420-WATER if you have any questions or ideas. Your continued support is greatly needed.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Sonia Lowman on April 17, 2013

"We Have Something to Say"

“It’s like your heart is about to explode. Even now, three years later, you still feel the pain.”

In 2010, Dr. Virginia Chevalier was a young medical resident doing her hospital rounds in southern Haiti when, around 5pm on January 12, the earth started shaking. She remembers everything sliding beneath her feet and feeling like there was nothing to support her. She still feels the shaking, even today.

Virginia knew from an early age that she would be a doctor; she says it was written in the stars. Raised in Port-au-Prince, the second child of four, Virginia “saw everything”—Haiti’s extreme poverty, lack of health care and stark inequalities. It was “like hell,” so Virginia decided to do something to help. She earned her medical degree in Port-au-Prince and went south for her residency. Then the earthquake hit.

Within about six hours, the hospital where Virginia worked started receiving patients “without hands and legs; with broken eyes.” She still had two hands but wished she had more to carry everyone at the same time as they called out to her, “I need this. I am dying. Miss, please, nurse...” All the while, she couldn’t stop thinking about her family in Port-au-Prince. But there was no way to get in touch.

Words fail to describe what Virginia felt when she returned to the capital three days later, so she keeps repeating “very, very stressful.” Even being a doctor couldn’t prepare her for what she saw. Virginia walked for an hour on broken streets that “smelled dead” to reach her family home. At last, she found her parents, alive but too afraid to go inside their house. It was then that Virginia finally broke down and wept. Relief mixed with grief.

Life became entirely about staying alive. With no food, no water, no money, “You just try to survive.” Virginia willed herself to focus on the patients who came to her begging for help, but her mind was “without energy.” After two weeks, Virginia went back to work in the south. She and the other hospital staff treated patients outside under the hot sun as aftershocks went on for week. They were always on high alert; always ready to run. Everything felt like shaking—“You just keep wondering when something will happen again.”

Then life goes on, or it has to. But everyone in Haiti who experienced the earthquake that day, Virginia insists, still has a psychological impact. Even the survivors are “lost mentally because people cannot support the shock.” They think, “Why am I still alive? Why me? When I lost my family and my country is in ruins?” So, says Virginia, “You have to fight—with everything you have. Otherwise, you will lose your mind.”

When she finished her residency, Virginia tried to return to Port-au-Prince to be with her family. She applied to countless jobs in the city to no avail. Finally, one day, she had a talk with God: “Ok I’m ready to go where you want me to go.” She expanded her job search to outside Port-au-Prince and immediately received calls from several different non-governmental organizations, including International Medical Corps. After meeting with us, Virginia cancelled her other interviews. It just felt right.

According to Virginia, International Medical Corps saw more in her than she saw in herself. After one month, she became the supervisor of one of our sites, then another, and finally her work took her back to Port-au-Prince. Step by step, she became a manager: “I grew up with International Medical Corps. I learned so much.” Today, she does more capacity-building than clinical work, and although she sometimes misses contact with patients, she knows she’s “helping lay the groundwork for more.”

For instance, says Virginia, “If you work in a clinic, you may deliver a beautiful baby girl. But I get to fight for something else: to have more health facilities where women can give birth safely and hygienically; more trained OBGYNs; places where a mother can take her child if it has disabilities.”

Virginia also likes that “International Medical Corps does not come and try to decide what you need for you. They put national staff in the middle of the process and ask ‘What do you need? ‘How can we help the situation?’” She is proud to represent International Medical Corps at meeting with agencies like the United Nations and World Health Organization, but says her presence is “unusual” because “I’m female and a Haitian national.”

It shouldn’t be. Ultimately, the expertise of an ex-pat will come and go, but it’s Haitians who will stay. Says Virginia, “We will always be part of our country. It’s our country. And we have something to say.”

Today, Virginia believes that it was all “not for nothing.” She thinks that Haiti was “slipping” before the earthquake and then was “shaken to move forward”—to better understand “the lack” that existed and how to rebuild in a more equal and sustainable way. In the end, says Virginia:

I think the earthquake brought something to us. We started to realize that the way we used to live was not correct, and that we have to integrate into the world. If every Haitian can think like this, I think that everything that happened to us will serve to progress us; to bring something different for the next generation. There is a lesson. We have to push to enter into life; to not be separate.”

And so, Virginia — and Haiti — bravely pushes on.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on March 26, 2013

Hurricane Sandy Update

Hurricane Sandy Update Meeting
Hurricane Sandy Update Meeting

Staff from the Lambi Fund of Haiti met with representatives from 14 grassroots organizations on February 25, 2013 in Les Cayes, Haiti to receive an update on Hurricane Sandy relief efforts.  Following the immense flooding that led to widespread loss of crops and livestock, Lambi Fund mobilized to provide emergency relief grants to 14 affected organizations in Southern Haiti.  These grants were used to help organization members that were the most adversely affected purchase new seeds, fertilizers and supplies to replant their crops.  Funds were also used to repair irrigation canals and replace livestock that were lost in the storm.

Thanks to support from donors like you, Lambi Fund was able to swiftly provide partners with the resources they needed to recover.  A member of the Women’s Organization of Jabwen explained that, “Following the storm, the peasant population thought we couldn’t stand up again - all was lost.  Members were depressed and complaining about their circumstances.  Everyone was wondering - what are we going to do?  How will we move forward?  The emergency funding gave the people a change to till our land and plant again.  We worked together and plowed for other organizations and members in the community.” 

Another recipient and member of the local organization AFDL shared that, “Before relief funding from Lambi Fund came, people weren’t sure when they could plant and harvest again.   This was a major concern for everyone.  The Lambi Fund of Haiti helped us till the land again…we have gardens again.  The emergency relief was an opportunity for us.  Hurricane Sandy came during planting season and we weren’t sure how we were going to repair the land.   With Lambi Fund’s support, we re-tilled the land and planted again.   Now we have corn, nuts, and black beans and harvesting has begun.”

Despite these successes, many organization members shared their struggles with the current drought.  For most, it has not rained since the hurricane and this has made replanting and growing food near impossible.   A member of Tet-Kole Bedo said, “We’re having a hurricane of sun now.  The land is dry and hard – it is impossible to plant and difficult to grow feed for animal husbandry projects.”   He continued on explaining, “In January everyone was ready to plant, but there was no rain.  So we wait.  We keep waiting for the rain to come.” 

It is external circumstances like these that make farming in Haiti difficult.  The environment and increasing unpredictability of precipitation leave impoverished farmers at the mercy of the land.  Given these realities, Lambi Fund is working with organizations on capacity building so that they can work to address these vulnerabilities (through irrigation canals and mobile water pumps, for example).  When organizations begin advocating and petitioning the government for policies that will benefit the community, it is then that key concerns begin to be resolved.

A member of OFJ explained the value of organizing best when she said, “At first, our husbands would always ask, ‘Why are you part of that organization?  It takes up too much time.’  Then we received assistance from the Lambi Fund of Haiti [for goat breeding efforts] and they began to see our projects and the impact.  Now our husbands will ask – ‘What are you doing home?  Go to your meeting!’  They see the value of our work and want to be organized too.”

Lambi Fund partners sharing their stories
Lambi Fund partners sharing their stories

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Gina Herakovic on February 11, 2013

Updates from the Field

Patient receiving Cholera treatment from PIH
Patient receiving Cholera treatment from PIH

Our most sincere gratitude goes out to all of you GlobalGivers who have continued to help in our efforts to bring relief and rebuild Haiti. It has been more than 3 years since a massive earthquake devastated the world’s poorest country, yet with your generous contributions we have been able to support organizations that have been on the ground since the initial emergency response.

One of these organizations, Partners in Health (PIH) and its Haitian sister organization, Zanmi Lasante (Partners in Health in Creole) is the largest healthcare provider in Haiti. Not only are they dedicated to treating the here and now, but PIH and ZL are building sustainable solutions that will raise standards of healthcare for the poor in rural Haiti. They are introducing new treatments and diagnostics to Haitian doctors, nurses and specialists that will address common and complex illnesses.

These illnesses which have common prevention methods tend to run rampant in poverty stricken areas like Haiti. Cholera has had devastating effects ever since the epidemic began 10 months after the earthquake. According to special correspondent for PBS Newshour Fred de Sam Lazaro, “Fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%.” While these short term efforts have proven successful, cholera is likely to remain for some time. Problems such as the cholera epidemic have shown how vital it is that rebuilding efforts remain strong and relentless both in the literal sense and physical sense. PIH and ZL raised $22 million to build a state of art teaching hospital with 300 beds. In 10 years’ time, they will turn it over to the government to have control of.

Like PIH, International Medical Corps has been on the ground since the beginning of the disaster and are focused on rebuilding Haiti’s infrastructure from the bottom up. By providing vigorous training programs and technical assistance to local health officials, they are slowly making it possible for Haiti to be self-reliant. As a result of the cholera outbreak, International Medical Corps added two additional mobile medical units to provide cholera screenings, hygiene promotion and other health care services. This is in addition to the network of health care clinics that have already been established that administer a range of programs such as disaster risk reduction, nutrition, early childhood development, mental health, etc.

Both organizations have done amazing jobs at not only providing relief to Haiti, but also by working side by side with its citizens so that they may learn from them and become self-sufficient. This is fundamental to the survival of Haiti. In order to stand on its own, it must have a strong infrastructure with educated citizens. So much has been accomplished in the past three years, and this has only been made possible by you. Three years and counting of unwavering support have resulted in quality healthcare delivered to poverty stricken people. You have helped to save the lives of Haitians of all ages. So thank you for your commitment and belief in rebuilding Haiti one day at a time, and one life at a time.

IMC assessing damage from Hurricane Sandy
IMC assessing damage from Hurricane Sandy
Despite the damage, kids are still able to smile
Despite the damage, kids are still able to smile

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Steve Bostian on February 01, 2013

4th Quarter 2012 UPDATE

Haitian girls at World Handwashing Day demo
Haitian girls at World Handwashing Day demo

We are continuing our efforts to provide clean water for 900,000 rural Haitians families who are without. 

Some recent accomplishments include:

  • Completion of partnership contract with CESVI, and Italian NGO
  • Contracted to supply 99,000 bottles of our Gadyen Dlo brand chlorine solution to UNICEF
  • Selected as a Final candidate for a large water and sanitation project to reach thousands of families
  • Increased marketing activities (new website, logo, facebook and twitter)

World Handwashing Day

Recently, Deep Springs staff and volunteers had the opportunity to participate in this annual United Nations’ event to educate local school children and communities about the importance of hand washing.

Our 5 gallon bucket systems were used as the water dispensers for the demonstrations, which also gave us an opportunity to emphasize the importance of chlorine treatment and proper storage.    

Many learned that, even though water can be clean at the source, it can become contaminated by dirty hands, dirty containers, or by not keeping a lid on the container.

Investing in our Team

At Deep Springs, we recognize that an organization is people…and so there is no better investment than the one we invest into staff training and development.   Recently we had another round of training, in Milot (north) and Leogane (south).

Focus areas included: definition of leadership, styles of leadership, and strategic planning.  Many games and group dynamics were included to facilitate learning, and help the team bond. 

The concluding commitment of the team is one we can all embrace: “Though the road ahead may be painful, we will achieve our objectives TOGETHER!”  

Thank you again for supporting suffering families in Haiti who need life-giving clean water!

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Haiti Water Relief

By Kevin Adams on January 24, 2013

WaterBrick International in Haiti - Our Continued Efforts

Ship Container filled with WaterBricks - Haiti
Ship Container filled with WaterBricks - Haiti

January 23, 2013 – WaterBrick International is continuing to help make a positive impact in Haiti.  WaterBrick containers are providing a way to sanitarily store and distribute disinfected clean water to Cholera Treatment Centers (CTC) which help stop the spread of Cholera in this country.

As of the beginning of this year, two ship containers filled with WaterBricks were sent to the National Palace and the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) on the requests of the First Lady and their Minister of Health.  A third ship container was sent to the Haiti Communitere.  Our intent was to distribute all of the WaterBricks in that third ship container to Health Capacity Zones around Haiti as agreed to by the MSPP.  In addition to our WaterBrick containers, 400 gallons of chlorine were sent directly to the Ministry of Health and distributed by Dr. Claude Surena, former Ministry of Health, to numerous Cholera Treatment Centers (CTC) in and around Port au Prince.

We will continue working in Haiti to help stop the spread of Cholera.  Feel free to call us at 877-420-WATER if you have any questions or ideas. Your continued support is greatly needed.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam G See on January 25, 2013

VIDA USA : 2012 was a Record Year!

Dear Friends of VIDA

2012 was an extraordinary year for VIDA as we shipped a record 50 containers carrying nearly $30 million in aid. We have once again witnessed the boundless generosity of people like you who have answered the call to ease the pain and despair of our less fortunate brothers and sisters in Latin America.

For Haiti it a three year anniversary of the earthquake and thereafter rebuilding. Haiti still needs our help.

We currently have five containers of medical supplies, valued at $4 million, sitting in our warehouse ready for shipment to Latin America. Here is where you can help. For every $1 you donate, VIDA is able to send $160 in life-saving medical aid. This is an incredible accomplishment made possible by our dedicated VIDA volunteers, staff, and supporters.

VIDA honors the dignity of every individual throughout Latin America, from those living in the Andean communities of Peru, to the shantytowns of Haiti, to the coastal towns of Chile, to the urban centers of Ecuador.  We are exceedingly grateful to all of our supporters who have so generously given their time, talents, and treasures to our mission. 

 Today, we ask you to help us reach our fresh goals for 2013 and bring the gift of LIFE to those in greatest need.

Sincerely,

Haydée Rodrîguez-Pastor
President 

Adam G See
Executive Director

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Sonia Lowman on January 17, 2013

Three Years Later

Mobile medical teams in Sandy aftermath.
Mobile medical teams in Sandy aftermath.

This month marked three years since Haiti’s 2010 earthquake—a day none of us will ever forget. It also marks International Medical Corps’ third year in Haiti, where we have been working uninterrupted, side by side with Haitians, since just 22 hours after the earthquake hit.

With your support, International Medical Corps has accomplished an enormous amount over the past three years. During the initial emergency response, we deployed more than 400 medical volunteers to provide critical care for hundreds of thousands of Haitians. Subsequently, we established a network of primary health care clinics in and around earthquake-affected areas and launched programs in mental health, nutrition, child protection, early childhood development, water and sanitation, disaster risk reduction, emergency medicine development, and cholera prevention and response.

International Medical Corps was one of the first responders to Haiti’s cholera outbreak in October 2010, rolling out a network of 10 cholera treatment centers that provided lifesaving cholera care for more than 33,215 cholera patients. We also ran an emergency medicine development program at Port-au-Prince's General Hospital that trained more than 300 Haitian physicians and nurses in nearly every component of emergency care delivery.  

In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy wreaked further havoc on the fragile island nation, killing at least 54, leaving over 200,000 homeless, and causing extensive flooding and damage. Diarrheal disease, cholera and food insecurity have spiked as a result of Sandy. International Medical Corps responded by adding two additional mobile medical units (MMUs) in one of the hardest hit areas, Les Cayes, to provide cholera screenings, primary health screenings, health care services and hygiene promotion.

All this—three years of support for Haiti’s recovery—was made possible by you.

Today, we continue to help rebuild Haiti’s broken health infrastructure through robust training programs for local health professionals and technical assistance to the Ministry of Health, while providing cholera treatment and prevention services through MMUs in hard-to-reach remote communities in Southern Haiti. We are also working to rehabilitate the damaged Aquin District water supply system, restoring water for 94,000 vulnerable Haitians.  

So thank you for helping Haiti rebuild: one day at a time for three years running and still going strong.  

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on January 10, 2013

PIH Haiti Earthquake Recovery - Jan. 2013 Update

On December 4, 2012, PBS NewsHour featured a story on Partners In Health's ongoing earthquake recovery efforts in Haiti.  Below, please find a transcript of the program as well as a link to the video. 

Long After Earthquake, Haiti Still Feels Devastating Effects of Cholera Epidemic

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/globalhealth/july-dec12/haiti_12-04.html

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: The 2010 earthquake that devastated Haiti may still loom large in Americans' memory, but, in Haiti itself, that was at least three disasters ago, before Hurricanes Tomas last year, Isaac in August, and recently Sandy.

Each storm brought a grim reminder of yet one more ever-present disaster: the deadly cholera epidemic that started 10 months after the quake.

At the cholera ward of Saint Luc's Hospital just outside the capital, Port-au-Prince, Dr. Jackinson Davilmar says since Hurricane Sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day.

DR. JACKINSON DAVILMAR, Saint Luc Medical Center (through translator): Most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places like Petionville where we had not seen them before. I'm not positive, but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Experts believe cholera was brought here by U.N. peacekeepers at the time, a battalion from Nepal. Untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the ArtiboniteRiver, the major source of water for both washing and drinking.

Cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. Two years on, 200,000 patients have been sickened, 7,500 have died from the extreme diarrhea and fluid loss. Each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases.

The epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. Fatalities have dropped from 10 percent of cases early on to about 1 percent.

Still, 600 people have died from cholera this year, many in remote areas, even those unaffected by floods. There's now plenty of awareness of cholera in Haiti. The biggest challenge for people today is distance.

As the epidemic subsided over the last few months, many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. So, getting to places that remain open is a huge challenge. It can take hours. And that delay can be fatal.

Sentiment Joseph, a 27-year-old mother of three, will likely recover, having made it in time to get prompt antibiotics and rehydration therapy. Her husband wasn't so lucky. He died a week earlier in their home less than an hour away by motorcycle.

SENTIMENT JOSEPH, Cholera survivor (through translator): He took ill around midnight. There was no one to care for the children, no means to bring him in. We didn't have the money to hire a motorcycle.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Across this spartan treatment center run by the Boston-based charity Partners in Health, other challenges were apparent from patient stories.

MAN (through translator): We don't have hygienic facilities. We treat our water, but don't have a formal latrine.

MAN (through translator): I was staying in my sister's home, and I'm not sure she treated the water.

MAN (through translator): There are 14 people living in our house. And it's very expensive to treat the water for so many people. And our only latrine was destroyed in a road-building project. So, we don't have that.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Cholera, not seen in Haiti for almost a century since 2010, is likely to remain for some time, says Partners in Health physician David Walton.

DR. DAVID WALTON, Partners in Health: Cholera endemic to the region, to the country is the last thing that they needed. Permanent solutions need to be put in play to be able to really stem the tide of this epidemic that is still ongoing.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: He says cholera's persistence is a proxy for a much larger rebuilding effort that's fallen short, one that should have provided far more access to clean water and sanitation.

DR. DAVID WALTON: On a scale of A. through F., it's a D.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: At least 360,000 people remain in crowded tent camps, he notes. Other people have rebuilt in poor neighborhoods destroyed in the quake, like this one in the hilly suburb of Petionville.

Water had to be carried in. And there are few toilets, so there's a threat of cholera.

James Sanvil lives in the U.S., but was visiting family here.

JAMES SANVIL, Haiti: There is no water, no way for them to get water down here, because there's no water came, like, down here.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Kevin Fussell is one of many small providers who have tried to bring relief. He's a Georgia physician who started a charity to provide safe drinking water.

His group installed clean water facilities into six schools in the central Haitian town of Mirebalais before running out of donated funds.

He says they'd like to put in many more, but have had no luck applying for funds the U.N. has for water projects.

DR. KEVIN FUSSELL, World Water Relief: They're basically trying to come up wore water solutions for an entire country. And we're working in a very small region. And they're looking for bigger global solutions.

My problem with that thinking is that three years later somebody is still thinking about global solutions, when we have real problems right here. And nothing is being done.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: That's a complaint that's widely heard. In water and sanitation projects or anything else, there's little to show for the billions in aid that came in or was pledged to Haiti, says human rights activist Antonil Mortime.

ANTONIL MORTIME, Human Rights activist (through translator): I have talked to people in the tent camps. If you look at Cite Soleil, you can see that the situation is actually worse.

There's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. Corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Nigel Fisher, head of the U.N.'s large Haiti mission here, acknowledges the slow pace, but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example.

NIGEL FISHER, Deputy special representative of the U.N. Secretary-General: If Haiti were a glass, and it's gone from being 10 percent full to 15 percent full, let's recognize that without in any way diminishing the fact that you have still got 85 percent of the glass full.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: But Fisher says many of the problems were endemic to Haiti long before the earthquake.

NIGEL FISHER: What we're seeing is people who are in camps because of entrenched poverty. Many of these people were hidden before in slums. They're now in the open in camps.

And that is a function of underdevelopment. It's a function of weak governance. It's a function of lack of alternatives, and which these people faced before.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: He says one of the biggest problems is that Haiti's government, crippled by the quake and a corrupt reputation, hasn't been able to lay down national priorities for the rebuilding.

That's largely been led by foreign non-government organizations, at least 10,000 of them, everything from small church groups to the large international agencies. NGOs have received more than 90 percent of all aid dollars.

DR. DAVID WALTON: The amount of redundancy with the more than 10,000 NGOs that the U.N. special envoy's office has estimated exist Haiti just leaves one wondering where all the money has gone.

And, frankly, if you look at, as they have done, where all the money has gone, hardly any of it has gone to strengthen the government.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Partners in Health, which has been in Haiti for 25 years, is trying to restore what it says is the appropriate role for the government.

DR. DAVID WALTON: So, 60 percent of our beds have medical gas. They also have electrical receptacles and data capacity.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: The group raised $22 million to build a 300-bed state-of-the-art teaching hospital in central Haiti. However, it then partnered with Haiti's Ministry of Health to design and run it. It will turn over the hospital to the government in 10 years.

Dr. Walton says Haiti can never be rebuilt unless it has a strong, accountable government.

DR. DAVID WALTON: It would be so much easier for us to run it the way we wanted to run it and not coordinate with anybody but ourselves, because, hey, we're really smart, or at least we think we are.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: And you are the guys with the money.

DR. DAVID WALTON: We are the guys with the money. And, again, NGOs don't guarantee the right of health to citizens of any country. But the government does. And we see ourselves as supporting the government.

FRED DE SAM LAZARO: President Michel Martelly cut the ribbon on the new hospital, vowing his administration will do better.

International donors, who have withheld half the $5 billion they pledged to rebuild Haiti, will closely watch how projects like this hospital fare.

For many ordinary Haitians, the goal, as one health worker put it, is to make it to the end of each day alive.

Links:

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on December 27, 2012

Hurricane Sandy Wipes Out Crops in Haiti

Flooding in Haiti
Flooding in Haiti

In this line of work, you are bound to encounter setbacks from time to time.  Now is one of those occasions.  As you may very well be aware, Hurricane Sandy swept through the Caribbean and Eastern Coast of the United States in late October.  Severe damage was wrought.  While the brunt of the storm thankfully bi-passed Haiti, it rained heavily for four days straight.  In a country home to severe deforestation and minimal water management capacity, the flooding was severe.  So severe in fact that widespread loss of crops and livestock has been reported throughout the country.  In the South, farmers lost nearly 70% of their crops.  For impoverished farmers who depend on agriculture for subsistence, this has been devastating news.

In response, the Lambi Fund of Haiti has been working with community organizations throughout the country since the storm.  So far, 13 grassroots organizations have been identified that qualify for emergency relief grants.  These grants will go straight to Haitians hit by the storm to help:

  • Rapidly replant crops to increase their resilience to the famine that experts predict will occur in Haiti within the next few months
  • Accommodate short-term family needs
  • Allow the organization’s community-run enterprises to get back on track

Organizations will also prepare soil for planting, repair irrigation canals as necessary and purchase seeds that do not require a long time to harvest (such as beans, vegetables and corn).  Groups with animal husbandry projects will also be provided with the requisite funding to replace livestock that were lost in the storm.

Lambi Fund’s field monitors have also been in contact with over 50 other community organizations that may qualify for similar emergency relief.  These groups will be provided with the resources necessary to get back on their feet as well.

Obviously, a natural disaster like this is an unforeseen expense that we at Lambi Fund are working as hard as possible to meet.  Hopefully through continued support from people like you, we can help curb the impending food crisis as much as possible and keep impoverished Haitians’ incomes flowing.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on October 30, 2012

Haiti is Not Forgotten!

Children of VIDA
Children of VIDA

 

Hello Haiti supporters!
We are thrilled and grateful to report on our progress due to your financial support!
VIDA is collaborating with others to ensure that Haiti is not forgotten. VIDA continues to send additional aid to our project in Cayes Jacmel which is still reeling from the effects of the devastating earthquake. Our July 2012 shipment of $100,000 in children's clothing donated by Gymboree Corporation has cleared customs and is ready to be distributed in November. We shipped another $100,000 in Gymboree clothing in October 2012 which is due to arrive in late November. This shipment also contained a donation of 125 musical instruments to benefit the development of a youth orchestra and marching band.
VIDA has sent another shipment of basic medical supplies to the Cayes Jacmel clinic that is visited by a medical team led by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloir. Dr. Alix and his team have been providing critical care to tens of thousands residents with the aid of VIDA. This shipment included over $75,000 in respiratory supplies.
VIDA's work in Cayes Jacmel is an example of responding to the needs of the community and taking advantage of the limited import opportunities due to customs restrictions. This approach leverages our capacity to efficiently redirect surplus supplies in the United States to people in need in developing countries.
Thank You! All of you combined have enabled VIDA to send $150 in aid for every $1 donated.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Sonia Lowman on October 30, 2012

Hurricane Sandy in Haiti: An Update

We’re writing to update you on Haiti in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which has caused at least 51 deaths across the island nation so far. Late last week, the powerful storm ravaged Haiti, where 370,000 people still live in flimsy shelter and tent camps following the devastating 2010 earthquake. Eighty-four displacement camps were damaged, as were countless homes, businesses, roads and bridges

New outbreaks of cholera have been reported in Haiti, with more expected in the coming days. Extensive damage to agriculture, livestock and fisheries across the country has raised serious concerns about food insecurity and malnutrition—which will hit children under 2 years old and pregnant women hardest. Other critical needs—such as health, shelter and supplies—will persist for some time.

International Medical Corps has been working with local government agencies on the ground to coordinate the emergency response. We are adding additional mobile medical units (MMUs) in the most affected areas in the south and west, and expanding the coverage of our existing MMUs to respond to both primary health care needs and cholera outbreaks. We are also mobilizing to address the urgent needs of approximately 10,000 internally displaced persons staying in temporary shelters.

We will continue to update you on the situation in Haiti as well as our emergency response there.

Further, as the hurricane hits the U.S., we hope that you and your loved ones stay safe and healthy.

With many thanks for your support.

International Medical Corps has operated in Haiti since 2010 when our teams were on the ground treating patients within 22 hours of the earthquake. Following a comprehensive emergency response, we implemented long-term programs in Haiti including cholera treatment, primary health care, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. Today we are focused on training local health workers to help rebuild Haiti’s health infrastructure.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Sonia Lowman on October 28, 2012

Hurricane Wreaks Havoc in Haiti

Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy
Satellite Image of Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy has been sweeping through the Caribbean causing extensive damage. We’re writing to let you know that International Medical Corps is mobilizing to respond in Haiti. 

Twenty one deaths have been reported so far and Haitian President Michel Martelly has declared a state of emergency. International Medical Corps’ Haiti teams are collaborating with local government and United Nations agencies to coordinate the emergency response. We're prepositioning emergency kits, fuel and flashlights at all of our sites. In addition, we have Mobile Medical Units on standby to assist in reaching affected communities.

Thousands of people still live in tent camps following Haiti’s 2010 earthquake and heavy flooding from the hurricane has only exacerbated their vulnerability. Roads are badly damaged, bridges have been swept away, and the main hospital in Les Cayes remains flooded. Heavy rains continue and the Gray River, located on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, has overflowed—taking away homes and businesses. The main road linking Haiti to the Dominican Republic is also badly damaged, making it nearly impossible for vehicles to cross the border.

As crops throughout the country have been severely damaged, there are serious concerns about food insecurity, adding to the already precarious nutrition status of the population—particularly for children under 2 years old.

As a stakeholder in International Medical Corps’ Haiti relief efforts, we know that you are deeply concerned about the health, safety and wellbeing of Haitians. We will continue to update you as the situation progresses.

Many thanks for your continual support.

International Medical Corps has operated in Haiti since 2010 when our teams were on the ground treating patients within 22 hours of the earthquake. Following a comprehensive emergency response, we implemented long-term programs in Haiti including cholera treatment, primary health care, water and sanitation, and disaster preparedness. Today we are focused on training local health workers to help rebuild Haiti’s health infrastructure.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Kevin Adams on October 26, 2012

Hurricane Sandy in Haiti: Update

WaterBricks being Distributed to a CTC
WaterBricks being Distributed to a CTC

October 26, 2012 - The passing of Hurricane Sandy has caused rain to pour for three days straight in Haiti, the most rain experienced since the devastating earthquake in 2010. Over 300,000 Haitians are still living in tents and are at risk of flooding and mudslides. Sandy has also created a setback in the progress towards fixing the major cholera epidemic that has devoured the country since 2010.

Cholera, a water-borne disease, has killed over 7,500 Haitians and infected nearly 600,000 since the epidemic broke out in October 2010, according to government figures. Limited access to clean drinking water and poor sanitation in urban and rural areas means that cholera will continue to pose a public health risk, experts say. WaterBrick, with your donations, has been working with MPHISE (Haiti Medical and Public Health Information Sharing Environment) on their clean water initiatives to bring clean drinking water to the country to fight this epidemic.

WaterBrick has donated 400 gallons of chlorine and 12,000 WaterBrick containers in Haiti to date. The chlorine has been used for cleaning and disinfecting water in 6 out of the 8 Cholera Treatment Centers (CTC). The WaterBrick containers have provided a portable and easy way to clean and store the disinfected water for a long period of time. Since the CTCs rely on clean water to treat its patients, WaterBrick's safe water storage containers and chlorine donations have been praised for helping to reduce the spread of Cholera in Haiti. Feel free to call us at 877-420-WATER if you have any questions or ideas. Your continued support is greatly needed.

"Many hands make the load lighter."
"Many hands make the load lighter."
WaterBricks inside the CTC
WaterBricks inside the CTC

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Sonia Lowman on October 14, 2012

Still Going Strong in Haiti

When a 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit Haiti in January 2010, suffering in the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country was nothing new. With endemic poverty, stark inequalities and persistent violence, Haiti has long been termed a “fragile state.” But we know it for its strong people. And for people like you, who have shown unwavering generosity, compassion and humanity towards Haitians.   

International Medical Corps has worked in Haiti for over 2.5 years, since mobilizing our largest emergency response to date and arriving on the ground in less than 22 hours. At the peak of the crisis, our 408 medical volunteers saw as many as 1,000 patients a day, while at the same time training over 1,505 local health care providers, launching an innovative emergency medicine development program, and working side-by-side with Haitians to rebuild a decimated health care system. When cholera broke out in October 2010, we rolled out a network of 37 cholera treatment centers though 1,100 trained Haitian health workers, treating more than 39,700 cholera patients and educating over 2 million people on cholera prevention.

As International Medical Corps’ activities in Haiti have transitioned from emergency relief to long-term development, we have increasingly focused on addressing Haiti’s shortage of trained health workers and ongoing cholera epidemic. We are currently conducting continuing medical education sessions for local health workers and providing technical assistance to the Ministry of Health for cholera surveillance, control and prevention. We also provide cholera treatment and prevention services through mobile clinics in hard-to-reach communities, such as Les Cayes, in rural Southern Haiti.

In sum, our achievements over the past 2.5 years have been remarkable. All the while, your support has been invaluable. So thank you for being there every step of the way as we help Haiti rebuild and regain strength. 

Learn more about our work in Haiti and what your support has made possible. 

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on October 10, 2012

PIH Haiti Earthquake Recovery - Oct 2012 update

Mirebalais University Hospital
Mirebalais University Hospital

Haiti Program Highlights, 2012

The purpose of this report is to provide a general update on the progress of Partners In Health's ongoing work in Haiti since the earthquake in January of 2010. Thanks to your generous support, Partners In Health has raised over $140,000.00 via globalgiving for our Haiti Earthquake Recovery project. We extend our deepest gratitude, on behalf of all of our patients and colleagues, for your commitment to and belief in helping poor people access quality health care. 

Partners In Health and our Haitian sister organization, Zanmi Lasante (“Partners In Health” in Creole, or ZL) provide medical care at 15 health centers and hospitals across Haiti’s rural Central Plateau and Lower Artibonite regions. As well as improving access to care, PIH/ZL is dedicated to raising the standard of care in rural Haiti by introducing new diagnostics and treatment regiments for both common and complex illnesses. 

Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais (Mirebalais University Hospital)

Haiti has long been the heart of PIH’s work, and today PIH/ZL is the largest healthcare provider in Haiti. By investing in public health infrastructure and the local workforce, PIH and ZL are rebuilding the health system in rural Haiti and ensuring the long-term sustainability of our efforts. In 2010, PIH/ZL conceived of Mirebalais University Hospital (HUM) in response to an urgent request from the Haitian Ministry of Health following the destruction of the national referral and teaching hospital in Port-au-Prince in the January 2010 earthquake. Beyond delivering life-saving care to a poor and underserved population of 3.3 million in Mirebalais and central Haiti, HUM will allow us to embark on an ambitious strategy to develop the capacity of Haitian clinicians (doctors, nurses, and specialists) to provide care.

As of July, hospital construction is fully complete, and the hospital will open at partial capacity in spring 2013. Additional specialty services will be rolled out over the following two years. Upon opening, HUM will offer the following services:

  • Community health services, including vaccinations, treatment for malnutrition, and preventative care
  • Outpatient services, including TB/HIV, general adult and pediatric care, and non-communicable diseases
  • Women’s health services, including family planning, reproductive health and comprehensive emergency obstetric care
  • Inpatient care, including internal medicine, pediatrics, and intensive care
  • Surgical care, including Caesarean sections and emergency surgeries
  • Emergency medical services
  • Advanced diagnostics, including digital radiology, ultrasonography and computed tomography
  • Mental health services
  • Laboratory and pharmacy

As a national teaching hospital, HUM is designed both to provide a new standard of healthcare in the public sector and to take a leading role in training and retaining an expanded workforce of well-trained and highly motivated doctors, nurses, and other health professionals.

Cholera prevention and treatment

The cholera epidemic had affected 553,270 people and killed 7,238 nationwide between October 2010 and June 2012. From January 2011 to May 2012, PIH/ZL treated 70,582 suspected cases of cholera at our facilities, 56,506 of whom were hospitalized, and 282 of whom died. Nationwide in Haiti, the case fatality for cholera is 1.3%; at PIH/ZL facilities it is 0.4%. After a year of fighting the outbreak with treatment, we added an additional tool to our arsenal: in April, PIH/ZL launched a pilot cholera vaccination campaign which reached nearly 50,000 people with the two-dose vaccine. Though these achievements are substantial, we are additionally buoyed by the international attention we were able to draw to the epidemic and ultimately the World Health Organization’s recommendation that a stockpile of vaccines be available in Haiti

Cancer care

Building upon PIH’s existing health programs and partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Health, PIH/ZL launched the first comprehensive and integrated breast cancer program in Haiti’s Central Plateau and Artibonite Departments. Currently our breast cancer program is based out of Cange. When the Mirebalais National Teaching Hospital begins operating at full capacity, the program and clinical team will transfer there.

Because breast cancer is not yet a widely recognized disease in Haiti, most patients with cancer present in very advanced stages, necessitating some combination of mastectomy, chemotherapy, and/or palliative care. For women whose cancer results are positive, ZL provides chemotherapy and surgery (mastectomies, quandrantectomies, and lumpectomies) in Cange. Our current caseload includes 10 patients that are on active chemotherapy for breast cancer, and an additional 30-40 patients receiving Tamoxifen alone.

To encourage a greater awareness of breast cancer in our catchment area, our staff also coordinate extensive education initiatives at the community and clinical levels. Community awareness events held on World Cancer Day and International Women’s Day shared information about breast cancer with a broad audience. Community health workers, who frequently visit patients in their homes, also receive information on breast cancer to pass along to their patients. We have already seen an increase in caseload as a result of these community outreach efforts, and expect that trend to continue as breast cancer awareness in our catchment area increases.

Rehabilitative medicine

Following the January 2010 earthquake, PIH/ZL marshaled the resources of academic and medical partners to treat the thousands of victims who lost limbs and mobility in the tragic event. We have since built upon this emergency response to develop and implement a community-based model of rehabilitative medicine that continues to provide care to earthquake survivors as well as a number of other patients who have suffered strokes or other catastrophic illnesses that have resulted in limited mobility.

Patients who have been injured or ill are evaluated and referred to the rehabilitation team where they are comprehensively managed by an interdisciplinary group of professionals, which includes physical medicine and rehab physicians, therapists, rehab technicians and rehab educators. Awareness and sensitivity to each patient’s unique socioeconomic needs, personal goals, and social support is paramount in the formation of a plan that ultimately facilitates maximal community reintegration. Community-based rehabilitation and long-term accompaniment by specialized community health workers called Rehab Educators account for a significant portion of the clinical care delivered and is essential in combating harmful stigma and maximizing quality of life and reintegration.

Currently, rehabilitative medicine is offered through PIH/ZL’s two largest hospitals: L’Hopital Bon Sauveur in Cange and L’Hopital Saint Nicolas in St. Marc. During FY12, PIH/ZL supported two rehab technicians, six rehab educators, and one administrative assistant who carried out 455 new consultations and 1,520 inpatient, outpatient, and community-based patient visits.

These clinical care initiatives continue to revolutionize the treatment course following catastrophic illness or injury and address the harmful notions of stigma around disability. It is through the demonstration of what is truly possible that we practice daily disability advocacy. As a ward full of onlookers stands in amazement as someone takes their first steps after injury or a community realizes what a profound impact a ramp can have on individual autonomy and access, it is apparent that this work makes an impact beyond the clinic doors. In 2013, PIH/ZL will expand rehabilitative medicine to Mirebalais University Hospital, which will include inpatient, outpatient, and community-based service delivery as well as an emphasis on clinical rotations for medical residents. 

Cholera vaccine distribution
Cholera vaccine distribution

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Carly Anderson on September 28, 2012

Haiti Continues to Rebuild Two Years Later!

Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity
Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity

Thank you again for your generous donation to the GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake.  As always, we’re committed to keeping you updated on how your donations have been used to help in the recovery effort for people in Haiti.  In this report we will be highlighting two of the organizations that are working on the ground with your support.

Architecture for Humanity and their project is Earthquakes Don’t Kill; Buildings Do: REBUILD HAITI.  Architecture for Humanity has responded to the crisis in Haiti with Earthquakes Don’t Kill; Buildings Do: REBUILD HAITI – a long term rebuilding plan that has designed, developed, and implemented community centers, schools and sustainable housing. 

Recently, Architecture for Humanity begun its Education through the Arts program focused on civic arts. They believe that the rebuilding of Haiti is essential, but so is remembering its history.  The cultural past and present of Haiti cannot be forgotten as the country builds for future generations.  As a result, the REBUILD Haiti project has instituted the civic arts program.  The civic arts program will engage schools to teach students about the impact civic art has on a community. 

Volunteers for Interamerican Development Assistance (VIDA) has also been working on the ground to bring Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti.  Immediately following the devastating earthquake, VIDA took action to ensure that medical supplies were delivered to Haiti. 

Recognizing the great need that has persisted the past two years, VIDA has not only sought to bring medical aid to Cayes Jacmel, but they have now expanded their reach.  Gymboree made a generous donation of $100,000 in children’s clothing to the city.  Also, VIDA has sent over $50,000 in respiratory supplies.  For every $1 collected, VIDA is able to send $150 in aid. 

Architecture for Humanity and VIDA are continuing to assist Haiti with their rebuilding efforts through the people of Haiti.  Connecting with people on the ground is essential because each community is unique and must be looked at individually.  Both of these organizations have accomplished grassroots-level work. 

Thank you for your generous donation to the GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake, which supports the people of Haiti and the work of GlobalGiving partner organizations like Architecture for Humanity and VIDA.

Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity
Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity
Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity
Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity
Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity
Photo Credit: Architecture for Humanity

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on September 28, 2012

Storing Grains and Improving Food Security

Haitian farmer standing among his crops
Haitian farmer standing among his crops

                For many, the earthquake may seem like a distant memory, but in Haiti communities are continuing to rebuild.  Inspiring and innovative efforts to build a better and stronger Haiti than ever before are taking place in towns throughout the country. One organization that is lighting a spark in their region is The Youth Association of Sel (AJS).  The 255 youth members are working in partnership with the Lambi Fund of Haiti, to build a grain storage facility and launch a community credit fund.  The grain silo they are building will store surplus grains and seeds for use in times of need – droughts, natural disasters and in between growing seasons.  The storage facility will also be a place to store Haitian Creole seeds.  With this silo, AJS members are working to increase access to high quality, local seeds that they can share and sell to one another at an affordable rate.  Just as importantly, the food storage aspect of the facility is working to create a safety net for the community – making food and grains available when its needed most.

    In order to successfully manage and operate the storage facility and community credit fund, members of AJS attended workshops administered by Lambi Fund teaching them grain storage management and operation, bookkeeping, the issuing of loans and how to manage a community credit fund. 

     To date, 50 low-interest loans have been issued to members who are using the funds to purchase more seeds, tools and organic fertilizers for growing more peanuts, peas and corn in the area.  One recipient noted that investments from the loan allowed him to cultivate 25% more land.  Each repayment schedule has been paid on time - and since AJS manages the credit fund and interest earnings stay within the community, the fund is growing.  In fact, AJS members are planning to issue an additional 19 loans this fall to farmers in preparation for the upcoming planting season.  The silo is currently under construction and committees have been formed that will be responsible for managing the food storage unit and distributing the grains and seeds in an equitable manner.

     Thanks to your steadfast support innovative projects like this are cropping up throughout Haiti and changing communities.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on August 23, 2012

VIDA sends over $100,000 in new clothing to Haiti

VIDA Cayes Jacmel Clinic Project in Haiti
VIDA Cayes Jacmel Clinic Project in Haiti

For the past two years, VIDA has embarked on a grassroots strategy to bring medical aid to the poorest areas of Haiti. In response to the terrible living conditions, VIDA has sought new partnerships to send additional aid to our project in Cayes Jacmel. The vast majority of the city’s residents are unable to secure the basic necessities of life such as food, clothing and shelter. This terrible poverty has left many without hope for a better future and has led to illness, violence and despair.

Thanks to a generous donation by Gymboree, VIDA has just sent over $100,000 in children’s clothing to the city. It is anticipated that over 2,000 children will be fitted with clothing and shoes from this one shipment due to arrive in September. The project is managed by a medical team led by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloir. Dr. Alix and his team have been providing critical care to tens of thousands residents with the aid of VIDA. In addition to the clothing, VIDA sent over $50,000 in respiratory supplies.

 

VIDA is already working on its next shipment that will contain additional Gymboree donations as well as wound care supplies. Additionally, VIDA will also be providing room in the shipment for a large donation of musical instruments to benefit the development of a youth orchestra and marching band. The gift of music can go a long way in improving youth mental health, help foster their creative spirit, and give them hope for a better future.


VIDA's work in Cayes Jacmel is an example of a holistic approach that leverages our capacity to efficiently redirect surplus supplies in the United States to people in need in developing countries. This has allowed VIDA to send $150 in aid for every $1 collected.



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Haiti Water Relief

By Kevin Adams on August 09, 2012

Story Behind WaterBrick

Recently we were honored to have Dow Chemical sponsor us to deliver a keynote speech at The Conference Board in Boston.  We were asked to speak about the importance of clean water and the socially innovative product of WaterBrick to a group of about 100 people that managed corporate giving programs of some of the largest U.S. companies and we got to meet again with GlobalGiving there as well.

One of the biggest questions we get asked by many people is, "How did WaterBrick get started?" and we were asked that again at this conference.  Since the speech was filmed, we thought we would share our story at http://youtu.be/XGGHGuPekrc; helping others was and is our primary mission.

The second part of my speech, not in the above, is equally important, partners like YOU, Dow Chemical and GlobalGiving.  Some of you participated with us through your employee contributions from companies like Dell, Nike, Discovery, Colehaan, Converse, Capital One and others; we noticed.

While our work in Haiti is having a big impact, the Cholera epidemic is spreading and mutating.  Cholera will be with Haiti for the next decade or longer if we don't do something more.  It is spreading to nearby islands and now to South Florida.  It is mutating causing people to get reinfected.  If we want Haiti to begin to take care of themselves, they have to overcome water-borne disease so they can start rebuilding their lives.

Thank you for your help.  We appreciate your continued involvement either through donations or partnerships.  You can reach us at 877-420-WATER if you have any questions or ideas.

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Michael Ritter on August 01, 2012

Local Staff Retreat and Continued Expansion

Attendees at Staff Retreat in Jolivert
Attendees at Staff Retreat in Jolivert

DSI has always been committed to long-term impact and sustainability, and recently we have focused increasingly on investing in the human element of sustainability and promoting management by local staff.  For the first time, Field Supervisors from all around the country meet for a 3-day retreat in Jolivert (northwest Haiti) to share lessons learned and mentor each other as they develop strategy.  There were 14 attendees, and supervisors from each of four geographical sites presented how their project is structured to the rest of the group.  The Jolivert staff also gave a tour of their production facilities, as Jolivert was the first location that Gadyen Dlo was produced and has served as a reference point for other sites.  We also considered key performance indicators, discussed ideas for innovative approaches, and held a series of role play activities in which groups made presentations to each other.  The Supervisors said that they felt encouraged to meet each other and were energized to return to their programs and incorporate the concepts discussed.

DSI continues to expand in northern Haiti, particularly through our partnership with UNICEF and Cesvi.  We have trained 41 health agents about Gadyen Dlo who are part of the Ministry of Health network.  These agents have distributed bottles of Gadyen Dlo chlorine to over 11,000 families and are conducting household visits on an ongoing basis.  The focus in the months ahead is to distribute safe storage containers through a partnership with CDC, to transition from free distributions to sales of chlorine, and to increase visibility and promotion of Gadyen Dlo in the community.

Supervisor Miguel Exavier trains health agents
Supervisor Miguel Exavier trains health agents

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Haiti Water Relief

By Kevin Adams on July 26, 2012

Clean Water Video by Jean-Michel Cousteau

Haiti - Drinking & Bathing in River
Haiti - Drinking & Bathing in River

Clean water is a luxury currently impacting 2 billion people in the world.  In Haiti, cholera has claimed the lives of over 7,000 people and it has been estimated that 250,000 Haitians may contract cholera this year alone.  Jean-Michel Cousteau stated that cholera can spread through the coral reefs and already cholera has spread to the Domican Republic, Cuba and South Florida.  Meanwhile plastic waste is creating environmental disasters the size of Texas in the Pacific ocean and in many places around the world.

Jean-Michel recently discussed how these 2 different social problems could be aided in part by socially innovative products like WaterBrick.  How can you help?  Check out Jean-Michel's video link attached and help us continue to help those in need in Haiti by contributing and sharing our mission with family, friends and colleagues.  If there are other ways you can help, call us at 877-420-9283.

Haiti - Trash Waste in City Soleil
Haiti - Trash Waste in City Soleil's Canals

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on July 11, 2012

Haiti Earthquake Recovery - July 2012 Update

"When the 2010 Haiti earthquake crumbled the country's largest public nursing school, killing more than 100 students and faculty, we envisioned a country with a new generation of inspired nurses. With our partner, Regis College, we are facilitating a three-year master's degree to reinforce nursing education in Haiti for years to come." -Sheila Davis, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN, Director of Global Nursing, Partners In Health

On June 27, 2012, The MetroWest Daily News published the following article, detailing the grant awarded to Regis College intended to tackle the nursing education shortage in Haiti:

The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund has announced a nearly half-million dollar grant to Regis College to educate faculty at six Haitian nursing schools.

The $462,800 grant was made to Regis’ Haiti Project to assist in providing 24 Haitian educators with master’s degrees in nursing. These nurses, in turn, will be able to pass that education along to 1,650 students each year.

The program has a multiplier effect on Haiti by sustaining nursing jobs, promoting health care standards, and transforming the health sector, all while filling a need for skilled Haitian health workers.

“All of us who work with Haiti know,” said Regis College President Antoinette M. Hays, PhD, RN, of Wayland, “that collaboration from inside – from the Haitian Ministry of Health and Haitian universities – is the best kind of collaboration. That is what this Regis international nursing faculty partnership is all about as it educates the educators in nursing in Haiti.”

Clinton Bush Haiti Fund board member Sen. William H. Frist, also a thoracic surgeon, said, “Haiti is in dire need of indigenous health workers who are committed to their local communities. Long-term health and economic results can only be achieved by partnering with Haitians to build the health training and service programs that they own, operate in, and use.”

The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund was formed after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti when President Obama asked former President Bill Clinton and George W. Bush to lead a fundraising effort to help Haiti build back better.

“The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund’s support of our work is a dream come true,” said Nancy White Street, ScD, RN, director of the Regis College Haiti Project. “Thinking back to 2007 when we first traveled to Haiti to complete our on-site needs assessment of nursing in Haiti, and all that we have accomplished and overcome since that time, it is quite extraordinary. I always knew we were doing something very special. Although we were a small team, our spirit and conviction were mighty.”

The Haiti Project emerged last year after three years of planning and development. It has evolved with the collaboration of Partners In Health, a Boston-based nonprofit organization dedicated to providing quality health care to populations devastated by poverty and disease since 1987.

Initial funding for Regis’ Haiti Project included funding from an anonymous donor to Partners In Health and generous support from the Ansara Family Fund at the Boston Foundation.

In keeping with the theme of “Building Haiti Back Better,” the Regis College Haiti Project is an “educate the educator” model that is building constructive pathways for nursing education to help build the human infrastructure of Haiti’s health system. The project supports a sequencing of some classes in Haiti, some online, and some during summer residencies on the Regis campus.


Read more: http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/x1915462581/Clinton-Bush-Haiti-Fund-awards-major-grant-to-Regis-College#ixzz20ExORDSW

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on July 03, 2012

New projects are helping rebuild Haiti

Lambi Fund recently approved the launch of eight new projects that are helping move rural communities in Haiti along the long path towards recovery.  

One exciting project is the creation of a community credit fund for the women's organization AFAGM.  Lambi Fund is providing training and the capital needed to start the fund.  Workshops that train members on community credit fund management, bookkeeping, issuing of loans, organizational capacity building and more are on the horizon.  These important training sessions will provide members of AFAGM with the tools they need to successfully and sustainably manage their credit fund.

The exciting part of this project is that members of AFAGM will have access to affordable credit.  Current loans from banking institutions in Haiti charge upwards of 50% interest.  Now, women will be able to receive loans at 2.5%, which will help them purchase supplies, inventory and other goods for their small business enterprises.  These business investments increase incomes and help send their children to school and improve the quality of life for their children.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on June 11, 2012

50% Closer to Changing a Life

We have exciting news we’d like to share with you!  Starting at 12:01 am EDT on June 13th, GlobalGiving will match online donations to our projects at 50%. 

This means that your gift will go 50% further to help families affected by tragedy overcome difficult obstacles for a happier, healthier future.

Consider giving again to Provide medical care to Haiti or see our many other projects helping devastated communities worldwide recover and rebuild.

And there is more.

The organization that raises the most funds on Bonus Day will receive an additional $1,000 from GlobalGiving.  And an additional $1,000 will be given to the organization with the most unique donors

There are $75,000 available in matching funds – we need you to act fast before they’re gone!  If you’ve been waiting for the right time to give, Wednesday is the day.  Please don’t hesitate.

Our lifesaving work is possible because of you.  Thank you in advance for your generosity. 

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on May 18, 2012

May 2012 Report

VIDA is continuing to support grassroots efforts to bring medical care to the poorest  areas of Haiti.

In February 2012, VIDA supplied a medical team established  by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloire and two other Haitian born physicians who are working at a healthcare center in Cayes Jacmal. Medical teams have been visiting this center for the past two years with the assistance of VIDA. VIDA was also able to supply a group of volunteers who travelled to the center in Cayes Jacmal carrying 20 suitcases of medical supplies.    Aid  included nebulizers, ostomy supplies and surgical kits and other general medical supplies.

VIDA plans to continue and expand its support of medical teams serving Haiti as it represents the most efficient way to send scarce medical supplies to remote regions of Haiti.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Mattie Ressler on May 16, 2012

May Update: Profile of the Lambi Fund of Haiti

Banana plants and seedlings - GG visits Lambi Fund
Banana plants and seedlings - GG visits Lambi Fund

Hello GlobalGivers!

For this month’s project report for the GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake, we would like to feature one of the organizations that the fund supports: Lambi Fund of Haiti. Established in 1994, the Lambi Fund has offices in Port-au-Prince, Haiti and in Washington, DC, USA, and supports “peasant-led community organizations” working in the fields of sustainable development, non-violence, and gender equality. Many of the Lambi Fund’s projects provide capital for community associations to plant seedlings, establish coffee, sugarcane, or livestock farms, invest in more efficient farming technology, and purchase or restore grain mills to produce high quality ground corn and millet.

One of the Lambi Fund of Haiti’s new projects will be supporting the Youth Association of Sel (AJS) as it builds a grain storage facility and starts a microcredit fund. These twin efforts are designed to respond to two needs within the community of Sel, Haiti. The first need is for affordable high-quality grain and seeds for farmers. The second need is for access to credit at a low interest rate so that local farmers can purchase the seeds and equipment necessary for self-sustaining farms. The Lambi Fund will provide training for the community members in project management and grain storage so that participants can manage their resources themselves. As farmers gain access to better farming supplies, their businesses will become stronger. Loan repayments will be reinvested in the community, providing wider access to credit for the residents of Sel. Ultimately, improved access to credit and resources should revitalize agriculture and generate employment in the area, so that the residents of Sel can kickstart their own businesses and build a stronger Haiti.

The Lambi Fund of Haiti has many projects, of which this partnership is only one. Thank you again for your generous donation to the GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake, which supports the people of Haiti and the work of GlobalGiving partner organizations such as The Lambi Fund of Haiti.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on April 11, 2012

Haiti Earthquake Recovery - April 2012 update

On April 8, Jon Lascher, PIH’s Haiti Program Manager, updated viewers on Haiti’s cholera epidemic during a live interview on MSNBC’s The Melissa Harris-Perry Show:

Haitian cholera epidemic in wake of earthquake devastation 

Just months after a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, an outbreak of Cholera followed, claiming the lives of thousands. Haitian American blogger Alice Backer, former AP correspondent Jonathan Katz, and Jon Lascher from Partners In Health, join Melissa Harris-Perry in discussing the source of the epidemic and the potential dangers brought by the upcoming rainy season in Haiti.

Please take a minute to view the video here.

 

“If this was happening here in America, if this was our families in America, we wouldn’t stand for it,” said Lascher. “Cholera is still present… it has started raining already. We’ve had a period of time where cases started going down during the dry season and so we’ve had time to prepare…to do the right thing… But not enough has happened.”

During last year’s rainy season, the number of new cholera infections in Haiti tripled.  

“It spread so quickly because people don’t have access to basic rights like water, sanitation, hygiene, and health care,” continued Lascher. “It needs to be a comprehensive approach to treating and preventing cholera so that we can make sure that there aren’t 7,000 more deaths this year. We need to make sure we’ve learned from past mistakes.” 

As part of this comprehensive approach, PIH is working with the Haitian government and the Haitian NGO GHESKIO to launch a cholera vaccination campaign that will target 100,000 highly vulnerable people and prove that the two-dose vaccine can be delivered effectively in both a Port-au-Prince slum and an isolated, rural community.

Lascher concluded by saying, “We deserve to do better, Haitians deserve better.”

Since the outbreak began in October 2010, more than 7,000 people have died, and at least 531,000 Haitians – roughly 5 percent of the nation’s population – have become sick.

Lascher was joined on the program by Haitian American blogger Alice Backer and former AP correspondent Jonathan Katz.

Learn more about PIH's cholera efforts in Haiti.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on April 10, 2012

Goats Breed Futures

Kid goats!
Kid goats!

In order to facilitate long-term rebuilding and growth, Lambi Fund has been working with community organizations throughout Haiti on a variety of projects.  One such venture is with The Peasant Organization of Bige (OPB) to launch a goat breeding enterprise.  Lambi Fund has been training OPB members on modern goat breeding techniques, forage production and project management.  They have also built pens and enclosures for the goats to graze in.  Throughout Haiti’s countryside, goats are left to roam free and Haiti’s delicate environment is destroyed as a result.  These efforts to build pens and grazing enclosures are promoting Haiti’s environment while also providing the goats with all the food they need! …now isn’t this picture of two kid goats just the cutest?

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on April 03, 2012

Training Haitians to Save Lives

On January 12, 2010, our teams responded to the massive 7.0-magnitude earthquake in Haiti, arriving on-the-ground within 22 hours of the crisis.  We’re still in Haiti today, providing lifesaving medical care to thousands.  And at every step of our response over the last two years, we’ve been training local staff and health workers to save lives and provide care within their own communities.    

The impact was clear recently when Dr. Vital Hervé, a doctor working at the Hôpital de l’Université d’Etat d’Haiti, saved his patient’s life using a technique he learned during International Medical Corps’ Emergency Course for Doctors.

His patient was very sick, went into shock, and would have otherwise died. However, Dr. Hervé, realizing the dire situation from only his first week of training in the four-week emergency course, quickly identified that fluid around his patient’s heart was about to kill him.

Using a technique known as pericardiocentesis, he was able to relieve pressure on the heart.  The patient instantly improved and felt dramatically better, going from severe extremis to breathing comfortably and requesting food to eat for the first time in days.

“Without the International Medical Corps course I would not have known what to do; I cannot thank them enough.”

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Michael Ritter on March 26, 2012

Expansion and Optimization in the North

Presenting Gadyen Dlo at World Water Day
Presenting Gadyen Dlo at World Water Day

Our strategy for this year focuses on optimizing how Gadyen Dlo chlorine is delivered to families.  The mix of marketing, household visits, and sales mechanisms vary among each location where Gadyen Dlo is offered.  In the coming months, with the help of CDC and graduate students, we will be evaluating the effectiveness of these different models as we attempt to optimize how families have access to chlorine.  We are excited about the opportunities to improve our work and increase the number of families who treat their water correctly and consistently.

A particular focus in the coming months is on northern Haiti.  Through partnerships with UNICEF, DINEPA, and Cesvi, we will be expanding to 13,000 families (estimated 65,000 individuals) in the communes of Milot and Plaine du Nord.  We have hired two new Field Supervisors and are in the process of identifying and training over 50 chlorine resellers and health agents.  After families receive an initial free bottle of chlorine, the resellers will make refills available to these families.  The trainings will be accompanied by radio spots, promotion in schools, community events, and household visits.  We are excited to bring the lessons we have learned about community mobilization and promotion in other sites to guide our campaigns in Milot and Plaine du Nord.

Promoting Gadyen Dlo during Carnival in Leogane
Promoting Gadyen Dlo during Carnival in Leogane

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Michaela McGill on March 16, 2012

Final Report: Two Years of Vital Information in Haiti

Karl Foster Candio interviews President Clinton
Karl Foster Candio interviews President Clinton

As 2011 came to an end, Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen (ENDK), or “News You Can Use,” celebrated the release of its 500th episode.  In the two years following the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010, ENDK has become an essential source of news for listeners throughout the country.  The radio program, produced by Haitians and for Haitians, continues to provide the population with basic information about health and hygiene, post-crisis reconstruction, development and civic education. Radio, one of the most important sources of information for Haitians, has played an essential role in supporting the population through the difficult and painful process of reconstruction, providing individuals with the information they need to make informed decisions for their well-being. When asked in a focus group discussion in the provinces about what they had learned from ENDK, one Haitian responded, “you can protect yourself from cholera by following all the hygiene rules such as: not drinking water that is not treated…not eating food that is not fully cooked.”  Listeners of the program are able to share information they learn with others, spreading important information throughout their communities. 

The impact of the radio program has been profound in shaping the humanitarian response and engaging the local population.  Throughout our work in Haiti, Internews has continued to work with local journalists to build their capacity and ensure the sustainability of programs like ENDK. Journalists like Karl Foster Candio, one of the early editors-in-chief of ENDK, have gained significant recognition for their skills and have gone on to work for other national news outlets, spreading their knowledge and skill to national news outlets in desperate need of skilled reporters.  This has been our goal from the beginning of the project and we are continuing to support the Haitian media through training and capacity building. Internews has engaged short term consultants to actively build the capacity of local media outlets in Haiti, and the Senior Resident Journalism Advisor, continues to help our partner radio stations to develop useful programming for their listeners.  This past January Radio Boukman and Vision 2000 independently produced their first ENDK-like reports. We are extremely hopeful and excited about the progress that community radio stations are making and their growing independence in the Haitian media.

Thanks to your generous support, we were able to help Haitian people spread vital information throughout their own communities during a time of great crisis. Our work would not have been possible without your contributions. 

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Mattie Ressler on February 15, 2012

Strengthening Haiti - February 2012 Update

Photo Courtesy of Internews Network
Photo Courtesy of Internews Network

Hello GlobalGivers!

You are receiving this email because you donated to the GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake, and we want to update you on what our partner organizations have been implementing with your help. As you might expect, disaster relief doesn’t last forever. Our partners have refocused their efforts on rebuilding and strengthening local capacity in areas such as health and information so that Haitians can continue rebuilding their homes, their communities, and their country long after disaster funds move on.

It has been over two years since a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck just outside of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. According to UN OCHA, the earthquake killed over 200,000 and displaced approximately 2.3 million people. The GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake was established with your donations immediately following news of the quake.

International Medical Corps deployed an emergency team to Haiti immediately following the earthquake and is still active in Haiti today. They have been training local health workers to respond to medical needs in Haiti, including supporting existing cholera treatment centers by providing supplies and additional training. Another example of training provided by International Medical Corps: courses in emergency medicine for Haitian doctors. One such doctor, Dr. Hervé, was able to save the life of a patient by draining fluid from around his heart using what he’d learned after just one week of the course.

In partnership with Zanmi Lasante, a Haitian organization, Partners in Health runs hospitals and medical clinics and facilitates medical training programs, including a residency program that teaches doctors how to become family care physicians. In another important endeavor, Partners in Health is working with Haiti’s Ministry of Health to build a new hospital, Mirebalais National Teaching Hospital (see video here). The teaching hospital will be equipped with up-to-date technology and equipment for Haitian medical students and patients, preparing the next generation of Haiti’s medical practitioners to save lives every day.

In the months following the earthquake, the Internews Network found that its program, Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen (ENDK), meaning “News You Can Use,” was in extremely high demand. After producing over 450 programs, Internews is partnering with over 15 media organizations to exchange training and to build capacity so that its successful news format can be replicated by local organizations. In addition, Internews is supporting 19 Haitian researchers to create an independent research firm called BRESI, which provides bi-monthly research briefs to other non-governmental organizations and the Haitian government. 

Haiti is rebuilding, but life is still difficult for many people. Over 500,000 people are still displaced from their homes and living in temporary camps. Cholera, a highly contagious disease, emerged in late 2010 and continues to threaten the health and lives of Haitians, with over 492,000 cases and 6,700 deaths associated with the disease as of November 2011.

Would you like to give to Haiti again? If you do decide to donate, you will be supporting the work of International Medical Corps, Partners in Health, Internews Network, and other GlobalGiving partners engaged in re-building a strong and healthy Haiti from the ground up.  

Click to donate to the GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on February 07, 2012

January 2012 Report

VIDA is continuing to support grassroots efforts to bring medical care to the poorest  areas of Haiti.

VIDA supported supported the third trip of a medical team headed by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloire who is the Chief of Medicine at the Oakland Veterans Administration Clinic. Dr. Magloire, and two other Haitian born physicians are working at a healthcare center in Cayes Jacmal. The doctor's were able to ship an ultrasound and anesthesia machines on their most recent visit along with general medical supplies.

VIDA also support a local church group which travel to Haiti in December.  They brought 24 suitcases of medical supplies to benefit an orphanage in Port au Prince.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on February 06, 2012

Haiti Cholera Epidemic Update

WaterBrick Attends MPHISE summit in Haiti

December 1, 2011  (Grand’Anse, Haiti) – Wendell Adams, founder of WaterBrick International joined Dr. Michael McDonald, the Coordinator for Haiti MPHISE and the President & Executive Director of Global Health Initiatives, Inc., and numerous other teams members focusing on presenting a sustainable solution to their water filtration, water storage and overall initiative to stop the spread of the Cholera epidemic.  Numerous solutions were successfully demonstrated and well received by various local officials.  See picture of one demonstration.

The feedback from these demonstrations was reported back to the U.S. Congressional sub-committee for Haiti by Dr. McDonald on December 7, 2011 and was well received.

MPHISE and WaterBrick: Haiti Cholera Epidemic Update

January 17, 2012 (Grand’Anse, Haiti) - The cholera epidemic in the Pestel commune in Grand’Anse has produced a significant and growing number of severe Cholera cases resulting in death.  This specific cholera outbreak is concentrated in the mountain region above the town of Pestel and has gained recognition of several aid organizations.  MPHISE is currently organizing a Phase II Cholera Epidemic Management Initiative working to turn around a moribund “hospital” in Pestel.

According to Dr. Michael McDonald, “the number of people being infected has also dropped significantly along with the mild cases of diarrhea (and potential mild cholera cases), due to household water purification and safe water storage due to WaterBrick water containers.  WaterBrick water containers have a critical role to play in this element of the Phase II interventions.”

Dr. McDonald continues by saying, “Unless the Phase II Cholera Epidemic Management Initiative can be engaged sustainably country-wide, Haiti will continue to fail to manage its deadly epidemic.  Easily a million more Haitians could be infected and thousands of lives lost in the fourth, fifth, and sixth waves of the epidemic, if the same epidemic management and governance approaches that were used in the first three waves of the epidemic continue.”

Dow Chemical and WaterBrick: Helping MPHISE with Cholera Treatment Test Pilots

February 3, 2012 (Grand’Anse, Haiti) – The MPHISE Phase II Cholera Epidemic Management Initiative has recently started four new Cholera Treatment Centers in the mountainous villages above Pestel.  WaterBrick International is partnering with Dow Chemical to produce WaterBrick containers for these four villages that will be used as a model for a larger scale initiative for the entire country.   Dow will be funding resin for the test pilot to produce these WaterBrick containers and continue with our shared humanitarian efforts.

According to Joe Loeffler, the Vice President with Dow Chemical, “…we are confident that very good WaterBricks can be made from this resin to service the needs of getting clean water to areas of need.”

WaterBrick International will continue to work with Dow Chemical to support the MPHISE Phase II Initiative and stop the spread of Cholera in Haiti.

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CARE provides water, food and relief to Haiti

By Rick Perera on January 30, 2012

CARE in Haiti - Two Years Later - A Progress Report

Francia Celestin
Francia Celestin

The story of Haiti’s devastating January 2010 earthquake is far from over. As steady progress toward recovery continues, much of the emergency response is now transitioning to longer-term recovery. With the confirmation of a new Prime Minister in October 2011, it is hoped that one of the most significant challenges to recovery – the lack of a fully functional government – will also improve.

 

The task of rebuilding has been slowed by the fact that, before the quake, Haiti’s economy and public services were overwhelmingly centered in the overcrowded capital city of Port-au-Prince. The new government is pursuing an urgently-needed agenda of decentralization but it will require long-term investment in economic opportunities in rural areas.

 

An evolving strategy for the decongestion of camps for displaced people recognizes that many of those who remain in the camps are among the most vulnerable and have few options to find permanent housing. Efforts are underway by CARE and other aid agencies to shift the provision of services to neighborhoods in order to minimize the incentive to remain in the camps. As of the end of September 2011 an estimated 550,560 Haitians were still living in camps. This is still a huge number but represents a decrease of about two-thirds from the peak of about 1.5 million people immediately after the quake.

 

Other ongoing challenges to Haitians’ pursuit of a stable future include a high rate of sexual and gender-based violence and the country’s extremely weak educational infrastructure. Even before the earthquake, more than 500,000 children between the ages of 6 and 12 did not attend school. A large percentage of families relied on private schools of inconsistent quality.

 

The country is still grappling with the impact of a large-scale cholera outbreak, which struck in October 2010. According to the latest figures released by the Ministry of Health on November 30, 2011, there have been 516,699 cholera cases and 6,942 deaths reported. While the crisis has stabilized thanks to the response of government and humanitarian agencies, Haitians now face the threat of endemic cholera, particularly during rainy seasons and in places with inadequate water and sanitation and poor public awareness of good hygiene practices.

 

Over the past two years since the earthquake, CARE has implemented a large-scale immediate and longer-term response thanks to many generous donors. Affected people have benefited from CARE’s work in shelter, safe water and sanitation, psychosocial support, livelihood opportunities and education. On their behalf, we offer our sincere thanks for your generosity.

 

CARE’s Response

In the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, CARE focused on meeting humanitarian needs. During the initial months we served more than 290,000 people with crucial assistance including tarps, tents, shelter kits, mattresses, blankets, kitchen sets, jerry cans, hygiene kits, safe delivery kits, newborn kits and food. From the earliest days, CARE was developing a strategy for reconstruction and sustainable development. Today, much of our earthquake response programming has shifted to this longer-term focus.

 

Transition to a longer-term response

CARE’s shelter team is closely aligning its strategy with the Haitian government’s priority of assisting families still living in tent camps to return to their original neighborhoods. We are placing a focus on encouraging sustainable long-term building and improved construction practices. CARE’s Neighborhoods of Return Program encourages decongestion in spontaneous camps by improving living conditions in areas of return.

CARE’s economic development programs aim to reduce dependence on emergency assistance by providing market-oriented livelihood opportunities to earthquake survivors as well as residents of communities hosting displaced people. We are supporting this objective through income-earning opportunities such as cash-for-work programs, supporting government decentralization policy and reinforcing and rehabilitating economic infrastructure. Community self-help and microfinance institutions, particularly targeting women, are encouraging savings and investment and creating a financial base for local community development.

 

Our education program continues to directly help affected schools close to the earthquake’s epicenter and, indirectly, schools overwhelmed by the influx of displaced children. As in our other programming, CARE’s approach is evolving to address long-term education quality, including the provision of psychosocial and teacher training, support for community engagement in schools, and capacity building of government bodies.

 

The evolution of CARE’s water, sanitation and hygiene programs includes helping Haitian authorities assume responsibility for joint operations that provide safe drinking water in cholera-affected communities. Likewise, in keeping with our priority of shifting services out of displaced-persons camps, most programs covering chlorinated water distribution to camps were phased out as of September 2011.

 

Our immediate and long-term activities in these and other areas over the two years since the earthquake are detailed in the following sections.

 

Shelter

The construction of permanent dwellings remains a slow process due to the concentration of Haiti’s property in a few hands and the lack of clarity of land titles. We hope the situation will improve with the recent inauguration of the Prime Minister. Nonetheless, CARE has succeeded in providing over 2,500 transitional shelters to more than 13,000 displaced people. The shelters were designed in consultation with residents to provide dignified, secure dwellings that are resistant to the elements, are intended to last for three to five years and provide the option of expansion into a more permanent dwelling. CARE experts have provided more than 300 hands-on training sessions to homeowners in modern, storm- and earthquake-resistant construction techniques.

 

For people in rural areas, where some households have been overstretched after taking in displaced family members and friends, CARE provided 500 home repairs. For survivors who must, for the time being, remain in makeshift shelters, we have supplied 20,000 emergency reinforcement kits, allowing them to make their temporary structures more weather resistant. The kits contain wooden panels, tarps, iron sheets, nails, metal bars, straps and instructions on making repairs. The materials are designed for reuse when families rebuild outside the camps.

 

Looking ahead

Poor infrastructure, including the lack of proper sidewalks and retaining walls, is an impediment to the return of displaced people to permanent neighborhoods.

 

To help foster the return of displaced people to established communities, in late 2011 CARE began surveying the quality of infrastructure in the densely settled Carrefour neighborhood in Port-au-Prince. We aim to create a better living environment by: empowering community-based organizations; legitimizing informal neighborhoods by reinforcing links with public institutions; developing an urban plan for the community; and improving basic living conditions in the entire neighborhood.

 

CARE aims to support a community of 5,000 households in southwest Carrefour as they improve their housing conditions, infrastructure and income-generating prospects. Part of our strategy will be to retrofit housing that was designated "yellow" (habitable after repairs) after the quake. A great many of these structures have been reoccupied without adequate repairs. A number of interventions, including a general awareness campaign, homeowner informational events, skilled labor training and mobile construction teams, have been designed to support better building practices.

 

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

The ongoing threat of cholera highlights the importance of safe water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programs. CARE began WASH interventions after the earthquake to support displaced persons, especially those living in spontaneous camps. As residents gradually continue to leave the camps to move into transitional shelters, permanent homes or with host families, the need for services inside the camps has decreased. Consequently, at 51 sites receiving WASH support from CARE at the beginning of 2011, only minimum facilities are remaining in place to address cholera response needs.

 

CARE recognizes, however, that many people leaving the camps face an even more precarious situation when returning to neighborhoods that lack basic services, including water and sanitation. Thus we continue to focus on transition and recovery actions aimed at helping to create necessary conditions for the displaced to return home.

 

Highlights of CARE’s emergency WASH activities over the past year include the ongoing delivery of chlorinated water via tankers to 10 vulnerable sites; support of water provision to cholera oral rehydration points and hand-washing stations in Léogâne; construction of 1,093 emergency latrines; and chlorination of well over 1 million cubic meters of water, reaching more than 500,000 people.

 

As we transition to longer-term recovery, CARE’s WASH team has completed 227 permanent shared family latrines that adjoin CARE-built transitional shelters, with another 23 latrines in the final stage of construction; built or rehabilitated 19 latrines at schools; provided water, sanitation support and public health activities at five schools; begun drilling 19 new wells and rehabilitating five existing wells at school sites, transitional settlements and rural areas; installed a pipeline in Ca Ira and the surrounding Léogâne community, serving water to 4,000 people; and worked to establish school hygiene clubs and hygiene promotion activities.

 

To ensure sustainability, CARE has collaborated with national and local authorities to establish 15 community water management committees.

 

Looking ahead

The next phase of our longer-term WASH strategy includes support for a nationwide hygiene education program in schools; the construction of water facilities at the Léogâne Maternal and Infant Medical Center; distribution of 3,000 water kits (jerry cans and buckets) to vulnerable families; piloting of low-cost household water purification systems; continued establishment of community-based water management committees on the operation and maintenance of the water systems; and training of six technicians on water system rehabilitation.

 

To ensure continued access to safe water supplies after the phase-out of CARE’s direct emergency provision of water, we have established a water chlorination forum in communities where CARE is active. The forum includes government water authorities and representatives from water truckers and well owners. To ensure a supply of chlorinated water as long as displaced-persons camps exist, a strategy is in place to transition from free water delivery to payment by camp residents themselves for water trucking.

 

Food Security, Livelihoods and Economic Development

CARE promotes economic development in areas directly affected by the quake as well as in parts of rural Haiti where survivors have sought refuge – often with extended family who can scarcely afford to support them. CARE directs some support to communities in northwestern Haiti, including Gros Morne and Bassin-Bleu, that host many displaced urbanites.

 

CARE’s ongoing Urban Horticulture Project is designed to assist about 100 vulnerable women living with HIV/AIDS in Gros Morne with the objective of improving income and nutrition through the production of vegetable gardens. Key activities linked to this project include training in agricultural techniques; the distribution of seeds; and educational sessions on nutrition and family planning.

 

Another initiative was launched for earthquake-displaced populations and host community members in Bassin-Bleu. The project included cash-for-work opportunities for some 2,800 families. Key activities included repairing 135 kilometers (km.) of agricultural feeder roads and 44 km of irrigation canals; soil conservation work to help protect repaired infrastructure; cleaning 69 km of drainage ditches; and planting 20,000 seedlings and cuttings as part of soil conservation efforts. In keeping with CARE’s policy of gender equity, 49 percent of cash-for-work participants are women. Several participants reported that they are investing income from the project in small livestock, children’s school fees and seeds for the planting season.

 

The Bassin-Bleu initiative completed operation at the end of August 2011. However, CARE is in discussion with the World Food Program (WFP) about the possibility of continuing food security and livelihoods programming.

 

Looking ahead

CARE continues our shift in economic development programming from relief-based aid to sustainable, market-oriented approaches that work to develop participants into productive, contributing members of their families, communities and the nation as a whole. As well, CARE will be launching a six-month food voucher program for 12,000 households in the Department of Grande Anse.

 

Expanding upon our current livelihood program, a new project team has recently launched a Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) program, a self-help initiative that organizes women to form their own village bank, through which members save and loan money to members to support local initiatives. Based on CARE’s successful experience with VSLA programming – dating back well before the earthquake – we are pioneering additional groups throughout the Grand Anse region and have started forming groups in communities directly affected by the quake or hosting displaced populations, such as Carrefour, Léogâne, Croix des Bouquets and Pernier. CARE is also partnering with local network providers on a telecommunications platform that provides groups a virtual "mobile wallet" to manage their savings.

 

Education/Psychosocial Support

CARE has supported schools in resuming and improving educational activities – a quick return to normal daily activities is vital to helping children overcome trauma. Among other support, we provided desks and chairs for 79 schools. As Haiti has gradually moved into a post-emergency stage, CARE continues to help 20 schools directly affected by the earthquake in Léogâne and 58 indirectly affected schools – serving displaced children – in the areas of Gonaïves, Gros Morne and Jérémie.Activities include teacher training and the training of adults to provide psychosocial support to children; the creation and support of community structures, such as parents’ committees; and capacity building within the government to help ensure a long-term commitment to education.

 

Although CARE’s post-quake psychosocial support project officially ended in July 2011, our education team continues to provide this needed service through a new self-esteem program, which places a particular emphasis on reaching the most vulnerable girls in target communities.

 

Since January 2010, CARE has distributed nearly 20,000 school kits – containing learning materials, notebooks, pencils, hygiene supplies and a T-shirt, packed in a nylon backpack – to students at 78 target schools. Each of these schools also received supplies such as chalk, rulers, papers and pens. In October 2011, 691 teachers received materials such as dictionaries and notebooks for lesson planning.

 

To increase the quality of education, CARE staff and community advisors have trained teachers on the use and creation of instructional materials. Before the reopening of schools in October 2011, we provided school directors with training on school administration skills. In total, 565 teachers and directors participated in this training, which emphasizes a student-centered learning approach.

 

Looking ahead

In the next quarter, CARE intends to support the creation of community-based committees that bring together parents, teachers and children to promote quality education and improve learning outcomes. The committees will be encouraged to identify specific needs relating to improved learning environments, access to education, child protection and equity. They will have access to grants to develop activities such as social events, infrastructure improvements and repairs. Training of teachers and school directors on teaching methodologies and school management will continue. The self-esteem program concentrating on girls is funded until June 2012. Other ongoing activities include interactive conferences and film presentations for students, teachers, school directors and parents, addressing the importance of girls’ education and discussing child rights – in particular Haiti’s tradition of child domestic servitude.

 

In the short term, CARE’s education strategy focuses on helping the government and schools adjust to the new landscape resulting from Haitian President Michel Martelly’s launch of a free education program. The initiative finances school fees, allowing 142,000 children between the ages of 6 and 12 to begin their formal schooling this year. While the program is a welcome development, it is resulting in a swelling number of students per classroom – each of the CARE partner schools, for example, received an additional 250 students, on average. Additionally, approximately 2,300 new teachers are being hired, most of them lacking basic training. We will work to address these new realities within the context of our existing educational programming and, as funding permits, with new activities.

 

Reproductive Health and Gender-based Violence

Addressing the health risks associated with pregnancy and childbirth is of the utmost importance in Haiti, where the maternal mortality rate was already the worst in the Western Hemisphere even before the quake. Women and girls living under close conditions with strangers in displaced-persons camps are highly vulnerable to sexual violence, which is extremely prevalent in Haiti even under normal conditions.

 

CARE takes an integrated approach to improving access to and quality of reproductive health services, with a particular focus on the heavily earthquake-affected areas of Léogâne and Carrefour. The project works with communities in addressing issues related to health and gender equality, in particular gender-based violence (GBV), as well as aiming to strengthen Haitian institutions to improve case management of rape and other forms of GBV.

 

We have supported the formation of 20 community committees in the target areas, which are now working closely with CARE to promote reproductive health and raise awareness on GBV. Key messages on subjects such as gender equality, GBV, HIV/AIDS and the importance of breastfeeding newborns are being disseminated through a variety of channels, including the distribution of T-shirts and flyers, radio broadcasts and group discussions with women and youth clubs. CARE is also distributing newborn and safe delivery kits to pregnant women and health centers, and has supplied health centers with reproductive health kits that include contraceptive pills.

 

CARE-supported committees are working to prevent violence and protect women and young girls in displaced-persons camps, with activities including night surveillance of camps; recording of incidents of rape in the camps; referral of rape victims to police stations and health facilities for medical follow-up; and support of legal processes to bring perpetrators to justice.

 

Within the past year, some of CARE’s activities in sexual and reproductive health have included: antenatal classes for more than 1,500 pregnant women; reproductive health training for 65 traditional birth attendants and 135 community peer educators; the securing of a commitment from the Carrefour police force to allocate female officers to handle rape reports; training to Ministry of Health staff on improved sexual and reproductive health services; the construction of two women’s centers and securing of land title to build two more; partnership agreement with HELP Hospital in Léogâne to build a delivery room and support free sexual and reproductive health services at the hospital; sexual and reproductive health training and supplies for more than 53,000 people; and distribution of nearly 270,000 condoms.

 

Looking ahead

CARE’s sexual and reproductive health and GBV prevention activities will continue until mid-February 2012. CARE is seeking funding to cover a number of areas that require ongoing support, including building capacity of community structures and health facilities to continue to provide services on their own. Other needs for this future project include family planning and post-abortion care. Despite being illegal, abortion is relatively common in Haiti. Women who seek the procedure place themselves at serious risk of debilitating complications or even death, with young girls being particularly affected.

 

As we continue to transition into neighborhoods and away from camps, CARE is establishing women’s community centers near camps rather than inside them, which also allows a larger population to be reached. Project activities were adapted to reflect this objective with 10 permanent centers to be built in these areas in place of the 20 temporary camp centers envisioned in the program’s initial plan. The critical services provided at these centers will support the return of displaced populations to their home communities.

 

An ongoing priority is to increase the proportion of hospital versus home births. Many expectant mothers are resistant to the idea of delivering in a hospital, believing that they will receive better care at home. Traditional birth attendants, fearing a loss of income, are another line of resistance. Traditional religious beliefs focus on prayers for a safe delivery, which mothers fear they will not obtain in hospitals. CARE is educating women directly about the benefits of hospital births and working with traditional birth attendants, encouraging them to accompany women to hospitals and providing financial incentives to make up for lost fees.

 

The Cholera Epidemic

CARE’s response to the cholera outbreak, reaching nearly 2 million people between January and November 2011, has been closely integrated with our ongoing earthquake response work. In recent months we have continued our interventions in Port-au-Prince, including in displaced-persons camps, and remained one of the few actors providing services and support in cholera-affected communities in the North-West, Upper Artibonite and Grand Anse areas. Fortunately, predicted hurricanes and the overall cyclone season (June to November) were less serious than feared and did not impose substantial risks to these cholera-prone areas.

 

Conclusion

Haitians have faced not only the consequences of a natural catastrophe, but a series of stumbling blocks – including a history of weak government, corruption, unenforced building codes and lack of clarity in land ownership – that have slowed the process of rebuilding. The fact that the disaster hit the heart of a densely populated capital that contained the vast majority of the country’s government and commercial infrastructure made the impact much worse. And to top it off, a cholera outbreak swept the country less than a year after the quake.

 

With the help of CARE and other humanitarian organizations, Haitians are making steady progress toward recovery. Some two-thirds of people left homeless by the quake have left displaced-persons camps and returned to more permanent homes. The inauguration of a long-awaited government brings the hope of more effective cooperation and rapid implementation of development policy. Reproductive health services and awareness raising are chipping away at unacceptably high rates of maternal mortality and gender-based violence. And ambitious plans for schools are a beacon for the future of a country where, even before the earthquake, far too few children had access to a quality education.

 

Seen in the context of how challenging recovery can be from even less deadly disasters in countries with far more resources – the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in the United States, for example – the pace of Haiti’s recovery from this historic tragedy is understandable.

 

Haitians have gone about the task of overcoming these challenges with courage and fortitude. Their friends from around the world can be proud that they continue to stand by this brave country as it works against daunting odds to build a better future.

Michel Immacula, 23
Michel Immacula, 23

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on January 12, 2012

2 Years Later: Challenges, Progress, & Inspiration

At 5pm local time on January 12, 2010, the world turned upside down for the people of Haiti. The massive 7.0 earthquake that struck two years ago caused unimaginable destruction to Port-au-Prince and the surrounding towns, devastated Haiti’s already fragile infrastructure, and claimed over 230,000 lives.

Today, the earthquake’s impact is clear -- more than 500,000 men, women, and children still live in temporary camps, with limited access to clean water. And the deadly cholera outbreak that began in October 2010, continues to threaten the most vulnerable: young children, the elderly, and pregnant women.

International Medical Corps’ emergency response teams arrived in Haiti less than 24 hours after the earthquake hit – and we’re still there today, providing training, and helping these vulnerable communities rebuild and become self-reliant. We’re operating an innovative emergency medical care training program for doctors and nurses in Haiti, as well as helping communities prepare for the next time a disaster strikes.

We’d like to share with you our Haiti 2 Year Report that details our work on-the-ground. Please take a few moments to learn what your support has helped make possible in Haiti. You can also read testimonials from doctors, nurses and the men, women and children you have helped us reach with lifesaving care.



While Haiti’s recovery will be long, we’re confident that we – and the people of Haiti -- can meet future challenges with your support.

Thank you.


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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Marie Marthe Saint Cyr on January 12, 2012

"Ve ki le?"...Around what time?

On this day, just two short years ago, tragedy struck and turned Haiti’s world upside down.  The impact of the earthquake on January 12, 2010 reverberated deeply throughout the country – forever changing each Haitian’s life.  More than just homes and office buildings were destroyed.  Over 300,000 lives were lost.  Each of these 200,000 had a name and a face.  They left behind sons, daughters, siblings, friends and loved ones to mourn their loss. 
 
We knew then that much like the aftershocks that continued to shake the ground for weeks following the quake - there would be several significant “shocks” that would rattle the already weary nation.  The work to rebuild would be difficult and would necessitate a long-term vision.  Rubble removal was slow and cumbersome, forming a team of international donors and government officials to oversee the millions of dollars in aid has been sluggish and ill-effective at best, long-term housing solutions continue to be a concern for the thousands that remain in tent cities and cholera arrived unexpectedly.  It swept through the city and countryside - taking nearly 7,000 lives and infecting over half a million individuals to date.
 
Amidst all of these trials, local Haitians are beginning to ask “Vè ki lè?”, or around what time [will the change come]?  Two years of talk and slow-progress.  The time is now and the Lambi Fund of Haiti is working with our partners to build a stronger foundation in Haiti from the ground up.
 
In order to make this call for progress a reality, several calculated strategies are in order:
  1. Continue to expand rural agriculture and increase local food production.  Lambi Fund currently has 17 projects ranging from goat breeding to community farming microcredits to grain storage underway in efforts to strengthen crop outputs and local food systems in Haiti.
  2. Provide technical training and capacity building to grassroots organizations so that they gain the skills needed to successfully and sustainably manage the business enterprises they are launching.
  3. Build latrines and rainwater cisterns in rural communities to help stem the flow of cholera while advocating for a comprehensive and improved water management system.
  4. Hire new staff and attend trainings from specialists in the field to enhance Lambi Fund’s core capacity in order to amplify programs and to work in partnership with communities on a more comprehensive and penetrating level.
  5. Bring human rights to the forefront of rebuilding.  The right to shelter, food and fair wages need to be prioritized.  Once there is a respect for people’s needs, we as a global community can more effectively mobilize to deliver results.
  6. Let the people of Haiti dictate their own future.  Give a voice to the poor majority and provide leaders of rural communities with opportunities for active participation in the decision-making and priority setting process for rebuilding Haiti.
These are not pie in the sky objectives.  These are obtainable goals that can be achieved through strategic partnerships and empowerment of the people.  While it may seem like a longshot to dream of equal rights and improved livelihoods for the many living in poverty, we at Lambi Fund live the hope.  We live to see people struggling make it.  We live to see that everyone has a fighting chance – that those who are down and out can one day sustain themselves.
 
The people of Haiti are strong and are carrying this immense struggle gracefully.  I urge you to stand up and stand with the people of Haiti: Advocate for the rights of all Haitians and demand that their voices are heard.   You can join Lambi Fund in helping to build a better tomorrow – this is the way to honor the loved ones lost.  Let hopes soar and Haiti rise again.  The time is now.

In remembrance of our beloved brothers and sisters,
 
Marie Marthe Saint Cyr
Executive Director

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Laura Soucy on January 12, 2012

Haiti Earthquake Recovery - January 2012 update

On January 10, 2012, the Chicago Tribune published the following article, written by Dawn Turner Trice:

Though world stood still, things moving forward in Haiti

This was the email Dr. Evan Lyon sent Jan. 17, 2010, five days after Haiti's devastating earthquake:

drove past the main central park in (Port-au-Prince) where at least 50K people must be sleeping and it was almost silent.

people cooking, talking, some singing and crying.

people are kind, calm, generous to us and others. even with hundreds lying on the ground, open fractures, massive injuries of all kinds.

there are few dead bodies on the street.

stench is everywhere.

the city is changed forever

Thursday is the second anniversary of the earthquake, and Lyon returned to Haiti last week to check on patients he hopes to bring back to this country for care, to help launch a new residency program for Haitian doctors, and to mark the anniversary.

Lyon, 40, is a Harvard-trained physician and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago. He's also the medical director of the Right to Health Care Program for the international medical and social services organization Partners in Health.

When he arrived in Port-au-Prince last Friday, he headed to a hospital in Carrefour, the neighborhood that was near the epicenter of the earthquake. He was on his way to meet a 20-year-old woman whose bone cancer had metastasized.

Lyon had been working with the woman's doctors from his office in Chicago since last fall and they had asked him to explain to her why she was no longer a candidate for treatment in the United States, as her condition was terminal.

Although the woman's cancer had nothing to do with the earthquake, she and her mother had been living in a tent since the disaster.

"I'll be checking in with other patients who will be able to come to the States for care," said Lyon. "But unfortunately, this young woman isn't one of them."

On the way to the hospital, he said, the first thing that struck him was how quiet the streets of Port-au-Prince were. And that's a big difference even since September, the last time he was in the capital.

"We drove through the downtown in the middle of the city near the presidential palace and there's a massive refugee camp" around the site, said Lyon. "There are about 15,000 people in that part of town. But things are eerily quiet and it almost felt better when more was happening in the streets and there was more activity."

Tens of thousands of people lost their lives in the earthquake, and about 1.5 million were displaced. About 500,000 still live in temporary housing, according to Partners In Health.

Lyon said that though most of the residents have moved out of the capital and into long-term settlement camps, he fears that some people may not have immediate access to health care or other services.

"There's been more engagement, more work and, in some ways, more progress over the last two years than in years before," he told me. "But it still doesn't come close to meeting the size of the need."

As he rode through the city, he said that though the main roads have been cleared of debris and makeshift tents, none of the buildings housing the ministries of health and interior or the Supreme Court have been rebuilt. The landscape has gaping holes and, for miles, bears little resemblance to the Haiti he remembers back when he first arrived in 1996 as a music teacher.

Much work remains in Haiti, including stemming a cholera epidemic that began in October 2010, and continues with about 600 new cases a day. Lyon has been working with a human rights organization that's investigating the cause of the epidemic, which, as of Dec. 25, had killed at least 7,001 Haitians, according to the Haitian Ministry of Health.

Despite all of this, there are signs of hope.

Lyon said one example is a new residency program that was launched this week at a hospital Partners In Health runs with its Haitian sister organization Zanmi Lasante in St. Marc, about 50 miles north of Port-au-Prince.

"Of all the work that needs to be done here, this is entirely optimistic," Lyon said.

He said the program will teach Haitian doctors how to be family practice physicians.

As part of the program, Lyon and other physicians will conduct classes over the Internet and travel to Haiti to teach. The University of Chicago also will start a one- to two-year fellowship in which trained doctors will work and teach in Haiti for about six months a year.

"Two years after the complete destruction of the main hospital and medical school, we're making progress, although it never feels fast enough," he said. "Within a year, a new national teaching hospital (built by Partners in Health and Haiti's Ministry of Health) will open. It's a nice way to think about the anniversary. Despite the many challenges ahead, we're moving forward."

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on December 30, 2011

Happy New Year!

2012 is almost here and we would like to take a moment to thank you for supporting our emergency response and long-term capacity building in Haiti.

This year with the help of our amazing supporters, we were able to continue our relief efforts in Haiti and around the world, as well as respond to crises in Libya, East Africa, and Japan. You can see for yourself --click on the video below and hear firsthand from our staff on the frontlines, working in some of the most unstable and dangerous regions of the world.



And as we look to the future, we hope we can count on your support again.

Your generosity was crucial during our initial emergency response and it’s just as important now, as we work to help these devastated communities rebuild and recover. Please considering making a donation or using your new GlobalGiving gift card to help our rebuilding efforts.

Your donation will help us start 2012 strong!

On behalf of all of at International Medical Corps, thank you for your support.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on November 21, 2011

Helping by Thinking Sustainable

Since the Haiti earthquake, WaterBrick was focused on helping with the immediate needs.  We are excited about helping in a more sustainable way now.  We are partnering with MPhise (http://haiti.mphise.net/) and We Advance (http://weadvance.org/) along with our partnership with Dow Chemical (see Dow Partner Report link attached) to assist in a larger initiative of water sustainability as MPhise states "the mission of the Water Working Group is to provide potable water to Haiti in a manner that will reduce, and eventually largely eradicate water-borne disease in Haiti".

But fighting disease is more than just fighting it at the water source.  Helping to provide basic housing to the nearly 1 million displaced Haitians also helps with disease and other social injustices.  As Mphise said on their site, "We heard testimonies of the many diseases contracted by people living under tarps, of the pain of women suffering from all kinds of violence, and of children who cannot attend school or plan for their futures in these conditions. We see how the planned camps (like Corail) have become hell and do not offer conditions within which life can flourish."  To read more on their report, click on the MPhise Report link attached.

WaterBrick is working on the final development to provide a 10 foot by 12 foot house in a box that meets the needs of the Haitian people.  We will provide more once this is finalized.

In the meantime, I am leaving for Haiti Friday November 25th for 5 days to participate in a Water Initiative project with MPhise and in a demonstration for the United Nations.  We will provide a better update on this as we have more to report.

If you'd like to help in more ways that just in donations, help comes in many forms.  E-mail us your thoughts at info@waterbrick.org.

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Nina Sheth on November 21, 2011

"News You Can Use" Marks its 450th Program

On September 30, 2011, the popular radio program Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen (ENDK), or “News You Can Use,” produced its 450th program. Due to its widespread success and popularity, the program is still being broadcast for free on more than 30 radio stations in Port au Prince and the provinces.  Described by the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) as the backbone of the humanitarian information operation of Haiti,” ENDK has been instrumental in providing critical information for the Haitian population that is based on their information wants and needs. While the program continues to have a strong public health and disaster alert component, it is steadily working towards a broader focus on recovery, reconstruction, development and civic education topics. With the support of funding from the Office of Transitional Initiatives (OTI), Internews and ENDK are contributing to media capacity building by intensive training and coaching exchanges with 15 partner media who will continue to produce such content in an ENDK type format beyond the current OTI grant.  Internews is committed to ensuring that programs like ENDK become self-sustainable and continue to provide vital and life-saving information.

In addition to supporting the radio program and training local journalists, Internews is also supporting a team of 19 Haitian researchers to develop the first independent Haitian research firm BRESI.  Internews originally formed a team of Haitian researchers to conduct research on the access to and use of the media by Haiti’s earthquake affected population and most importantly its information needs.  The idea was that this information would feed into ENDK programming to ensure that it was responsive to the affected populations’ information needs.  In recognition of the important work conducted by this outstanding team of researchers, OTI supported Internews-Haiti’s goal of helping the team develop into an independent research firm capable of operating to international standards.  The bi-monthly reports put out by the team are widely circulated among other NGOs, the Haitian government and other key actors, showcasing the tremendous capacity of the team to execute high quality research.   

Thank you for your continued support of humanitarian news and information in Haiti.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on October 25, 2011

Lambi Fund's 2010 Annual Report is Out!

The Lambi Fund of Haiti just released its 2010 Annual Report.  Your support on the project "Lambi Fund Emergency and Long Term Relief" played a pivotal role in our response after the earthquake.  Click here to download the report to read how Lambi Fund mobilized grassroots organizations, pooled resources, and launched a strategic response post-earthquake to provide relief and to begin rebuilding in Haiti.

Be sure to take a look at the section titled "Looking Forward," which will give you a detailed description of Lambi Fund's strategy for rebuilding and looking towards the future in Haiti.

Most importantly, thank you for your kind generosity after the earthquake!  Your support has helped communities throughout Haiti regain their footing.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam See on October 18, 2011

October 2011 Update

VIDA Haiti
VIDA Haiti

VIDA is continuing to support grassroots efforts to bring medical care to the poorest and worst-affected areas of Haiti. 

VIDA supported supported the second trip of a medical team headed by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloire who is the Chief of Medicine at the Oakland Veterans Administration Clinic. Dr. Magloire, and two other Haitian born physicians are working at a healthcare center in Cayes Jacmal. They are treating people for infectious diseases such as malaria, gastrointestinal disease, cardiac, metabolic diseases and orthopedic issues. Infectious diseases run rampant due to poor infrastructure and clean water. The doctors brough additional endoscopy, ultrasound, anesthesia, ECG and dialysis machines on their visit.

VIDA also support a local women's group which travel to Haiti in September.  They brought over 30 suitcases of medical supplies to benefit an orphonage in Port au Prince

Our efforts continue to evolve and will be long term.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on October 17, 2011

24 Hours to Have Your Gift Matched!

GlobalGiving has announced an amazing opportunity and we need your help to make it happen! 

Starting at October 19, 12:01 am EDT, GlobalGiving will match 30% of all online donations up to $1,000 per donor until the end of the day or when funds run out.  In addition, GlobalGiving is offering a $1,000 bonus to the project that raises the most that day and a $1,000 bonus to the project that receives donations from the most individual donors. 

Think about it: your gift of $40 becomes $52… $100 becomes $130…. $400 becomes $520…

But funds will run out quickly and we need you to act fast on October 19 to take advantage of this match before it’s too late. 

With your support for Provide Medical Care to Haiti, International Medical Corps has:

  • Quickly mobilized to treat patients through 24-hour cholera treatment centers.
  • Improved emergency response through training nurses, doctors, and community members on cholera prevention, emergency action, and psychological support.

In the past, your support has meant so much to countless men, women, and children in need.  Now, you can give knowing that your donation will go 30% further and that 92 cents of every dollar you give goes to program-related activities.

Please – act soon and your donation could save lives. 

Thank you.  We know we can count on your support.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Britt Lake on October 13, 2011

Rebuilding efforts continue in Haiti

Susan Warner / Save the Children
Susan Warner / Save the Children

GlobalGiving’s partner organizations continue to make a positive impact for the long term construction of the country by continuing to provide medical care, food, and shelter, as well as engaging in the construction of schools.  Below is a short update of the activities of some of the organizations that your donations have helped support:

Architecture for Humanity continues to progress in the building of schools and community centers.  The Santo Community Development Plan, with Habitat for Humanity International, moves into its third phase of planning a fully-serviced development for 500 families. The school, École La Dignité, has completed foundation; slabs and walls are now going up.  Meanwhile, builders are being trained in safer building practices as foundations are being dug.

Deep Springs International has partnered with local leaders and health agents, as well as large-scale actors like UNICEF and DINEPA (the Haitian government’s Directorate of Water and Sanitation). The partnership with DINEPA aims to provide 260,000 families, or over 1.2 million individuals, with Gadyen Dlo, DSI’s locally produced chlorine product. 

VIDA has supported a medical team (headed by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloire, Chief of Medicine at the Oakland Veterans Administration Clinic) working at a healthcare center in Cayes Jacmal. They are treating people for infectious diseases such as malaria, gastrointestinal disease, cardiac, metabolic diseases and orthopedic issues. Infectious diseases continue to be widespread due to poor infrastructure and clean water.

The Lambi Fund of Haiti is engaged in eight new projects are starting throughout the country that will strengthen communities and create important means for sustainable incomes. One project is a sheep breeding project for which 44 sheep will be purchased to start breeding and workshops for training in sheep farming will be provided.

Save the Children has more staff in place, with an estimate of 430 national and international staff present in Haiti at the end of the year. Save the Children aims to take advantage of this opportunity to better coordinate programs and support services provided as part of the earthquake relief effort.

Thank you again for your continued support to Haiti’s rebuilding efforts.

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Michael Ritter on September 12, 2011

Partnerships to Promote Household Chlorination

Registering families to receive Gadyen Dlo
Registering families to receive Gadyen Dlo

Long-term impact requires strong partnerships at all levels.  DSI has always focused on identifying existing strengths and collaborating with local partners.  Our recent activities have led to close partnerships with large-scale actors like UNICEF and DINEPA (the Haitian government’s Directorate of Water and Sanitation) as well as local community leaders, health agents, and vendors.  DINEPA has established a goal of providing all families in rural areas with access to an approved, affordable chlorine product to treat their water at the household level.  Gadyen Dlo, DSI’s locally produced chlorine product, is the product of choice for the third phase of DINEPA’s chlorine distributions.  Our partnership aims to provide 260,000 families, or over 1.2 million individuals, with Gadyen Dlo.

 

To accomplish the initial distributions, DINEPA is mobilizing local community leaders that will be trained by DSI agents and will distribute Gadyen Dlo in their communities.  This will simultaneously help DINEPA reach their goal of providing safe water and allow DSI to reach its goal of increased coverage of Gadyen Dlo.  The first distributions took place in the northwest department in late August, as shown in the pictures.  In the future, it is expected that these local leaders will also gain opportunities to generate income through ongoing sales of Gadyen Dlo.  We are working on a strategy that focuses on promoting household chlorination through a combination of mass media, community events, and one-on-one household visits.  In the coming months, your support will be targeted toward ensuring that families who obtain Gadyen Dlo through the DINEPA distributions receive messages about the importance of ongoing household water treatment and information about where it is available.

Training on how to use Gadyen Dlo
Training on how to use Gadyen Dlo

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on August 10, 2011

Preparing for Surge in Cholera Cases Following Tropical Storm Emily

Dear friend,

Last week, as Tropical Storm Emily threatened to cause widespread flooding and landslides in the Caribbean, our team in Haiti sprung into action to prepare our cholera treatment centers for an increase in cases. 

Haiti’s topography is prone to both flooding and landslides – perfect conditions for the spread of water-borne diseases like cholera. Flash floods are possible in low-lying areas, such as Gonaives and Carrefour, while strong winds can destroy tents and unstable structures, such as those found in the camps where people are still living.

As the storm approached, Sean Casey, our Haiti Country Director explained: “We are very concerned that heavy flooding will occur as a result of Emily, which will likely lead to a dramatic increase in the spread of cholera.  We are preparing all of our cholera treatment facilities and pre-positioning medicines and supplies so that we can continue to treat our most severe patients and to prepare for a likely increase in cases after the storm.”

In Les Cayes, International Medical Corps relocated 27 severe cholera patients out of our tented cholera treatment center into a safe, permanent structure, where they could continue to receive 24-hour care and be protected from the storm.  Our team also pre-positioned an emergency room physician at Port-au-Prince’s University Hospital to prepare for the possibility of an increased patient load.  They reinforced tents and other temporary structures, stocked our facilities with medicines and supplies, and ensured that vehicles and generators were fueled and ready.

Thankfully, Emily did not directly impact Haiti; there were strong winds and rains to the south but no damage to our program sites.  However, heavy rains will likely drive an increase in cholera cases, and with your support, International Medical Corps is ready to respond and meet an increased caseload.  Our staff remains on the ground in Haiti more than 18 months after the earthquake, helping to support and rebuild the country’s fragile healthcare infrastructure and provide ongoing treatment.  Thank you.

 

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Patti Mangan on August 02, 2011

A brief update: Good news on our progress in Cayes Jacmal, Haiti

First - thank you to all who support us!

In addition to our earlier efforts VIDA has collaborated with our San Diego based partner PCI to send four shipments a year to their clinic in Haiti serving some of the poorest, worst-affected and most densely populated areas of urban Port au Prince, specifically: Fort National, Belair, Nazon and Avenue Poupelard, and Croix Deprez.

Recently VIDA supported a medical team headed by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloire who is the Chief of Medicine at the Oakland Veterans Administration Clinic. Dr. Magloire, and two other Haitian born physicians are working at a healthcare center in Cayes Jacmal. They are treating people for infectious diseases such as malaria, gastrointestinal disease, cardiac, metabolic diseases and orthopedic issues. Infectious diseases run rampant due to poor infrastructure and clean water.

Our fist shipment with PCI included several endoscopy, ultrasound, anesthesia, ECG and dialysis machines in preparation of their visit.

Our efforts continue to evolve and will be long term.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on July 26, 2011

Breeding sheep and rebuilding

A very happy and healthy sheep!
A very happy and healthy sheep!

It’s been just over a year and a half since the earthquake.  This means that the Lambi Fund of Haiti has fully transitioned into long-term rebuilding mode.  Eight new projects are starting throughout the country that will strengthen communities and create important means for sustainable incomes.

One such project is a sheep breeding project in Sothern Haiti.  The Bedo Peasants Together organization (TKB) wants to raise and breed sheep in an effort to increase incomes for its members.  In all 44 sheep will be purchased to start breeding.  Training in sheep farming, veterinary care and on the importance of caring for the environment while raising animals will be provided in a series of workshops – which will ensure members are trained to manage the project for long-term success. 

Your continued support for long-term rebuilding efforts in Haiti make small business enterprises like this one possible!   The sheep will be purchased and sufficient training on sheep care and management will be administered thanks to donations like yours.  An easy way to continue to make rebuilding in Haiti possible is to lend your support by sharing this project with friends and family members.  The more we rally together, the more we can help a community organization like TKB get their development project off the ground.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Megan McLain on July 25, 2011

The Disaster’s Impact on Save the Children

Susan Warner / Save the Children
Susan Warner / Save the Children

The earthquake had a profound impact for Save the Children, which has worked continuously in Haiti since 1978.  On the afternoon of the disaster, we had approximately 160 national and international staff conducting development programs in health, nutrition, HIV/AIDS, education, child protection and emergency relief during Haiti’s frequent floods and storms. The urgent needs created by the earthquake required Save the Children to quickly initiate what became our largest humanitarian aid mission to date in the Western Hemisphere. By June 2010, there were some 1,200 staff, the vast majority of whom were working on relief and recovery programs.

As of June 2011, our Haitian staff numbered 757. While some will be leaving the agency as grant-funded programs end, there will be approximately 430 national and international staff at the end of this year—more than double the number prior to the earthquake.

Save the Children’s reach has also grown.  In 2009, some 1.6 million Haitians directly or indirectly benefited from our work. In 2010, with much of our attention focused on the earthquake, we reached 2.1 million children and adults through earthquake relief; relief for those affected by a late-season tropical storm; responses to the cholera epidemic; and through development programs that were restarted. We are also now in the second year of a five-year earthquake recovery initiative focusing on education, health, nutrition and child protection to benefit 1 million children and adults. 

With more staff in place, Save the Children seeks to take advantage of this opportunity and provide training to improve the effectiveness of our programs and the required support services and increasingly nationalize our workforce.  This not only addresses the very real needs of our Haitian staff today in terms of building their skills and leadership, but reflects Save the Children’s global commitment to sustainability, local participation and the long-term development of civil societies by creating talent pools of trained and skilled national staff wherever we work.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on July 19, 2011

Partnering with Convoy of Hope

It is absolutely crucial to work with humanitarian agencies on the ground in Haiti that can assist with distribution.  Convoy of Hope is yet another humanitarian partner to help us in Haiti.  We will provide more pictures as we receive them back from the field.

There is also still a huge need for bleach as they continue to fight cholera and it will be an ongoing battle for years to come.  The need for clean drinking containers continues as well as they have to retrieve and store water as the standard tap we are accustomed to is not an option.

We thank you for your continued support.  Any help you can still provide, including telling friends about our work, would be greatly appreciated.

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Provide Medicine to Earthquake Victims in Haiti

By Maria Trimble on July 01, 2011

Heavy Rains Forecast a Deadly Hurricane Season for Haiti

Heavy rains pelting Haiti in early June triggered flash floods and mudslides, leading to the deaths of at least 25 people. The rains came just a week into the official start of the Atlantic Hurricane Season on June 1, and demonstrate the severe devastation this hurricane season is likely to bring.

Haiti is still reeling from last year’s earthquake, which displaced millions, killed hundreds of thousands and severely damaged the country’s infrastructure. Millions still live in displacement camps, with nothing more than plastic tents to serve as shelter from the torrential rains. Dozens had to be evacuated as their camps flooded.

These rains and the upcoming hurricane season are also likely to worsen the cholera epidemic in the country, which has already affected 321,066 people and killed 5,337. Cholera is a water-borne disease caused by bacteria that breeds in dirty, standstill water, which in the aftermath of the rains blankets many of Haiti’s displacement camps.

MADRE has been working with KOFAVIV, a local Haitian grassroots women’s organization before and since last year’s earthquake. A few days ago, they updated us on the situation on the ground, calling it “critical” and reporting that many KOFAVIV agents living in the camps have lost their homes in the flooding.

The rains have subsided for now, but as we look ahead to the devastation that this hurricane season may yet bring, it is important that we support relief efforts that include women and listen to their demands. As pillars of their communities, women know how best to rebuild. And as they continue their tireless work to rebuild neighborhoods and deliver lifesaving aid a year and a half after the earthquake hit, no one is better prepared to spring into action when the next disaster strikes.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Patti Mangan on June 14, 2011

Global Giving is matching donations on June 15th!

This month, June 2011,  VIDA is currently supporting a medical team headed by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloire who is the Chief of Medicine at the Oakland Veterans Administration Clinic. Dr. Magloire, and two other Haitian born physicians will spend fifteen days at a healthcare center in Cayes Jacmal. The clinic has eight observation beds, urgent care unit, and six operating rooms. They are treating people for infectious diseases such as malaria, gastro intestinal disease, cardiac, metabolic diseases and orthopedic issues. Infectious diseases run rampant due to poor infrastructure and clean water.

VIDA has provided multiple small shipments of equipment that the doctors bring with them on their visit. Shipments have included several endoscopy, ultrasound, anesthesia, ECG and dialysis machines.

GlobalGiving’s second Bonus Day of the year is coming up and this gives donors a chance to magnify their support!  On June 15th, GlobalGiving.org will be matching all donations at 30% up to $1,000 per donor per project while funds last. There will be $75,000 available in matching funds.

Please help us support our work in Haiti by donating on June 15!

Thank you!

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By John Driscoll on October 12, 2011

Mirebalais Hospital - September 2011 Update

The construction of this new hospital in Mirebalais, Haiti, will bring to bear all that Partners In Health and Zanmi Lasante have learned over the past 25 years about hospital design that serves health care delivery, provides a dignified setting for patients in very poor settings, and allows health professionals to train and develop new skills. Workers broke ground on the facility on July 3, 2010. When completed it will house 320 beds, serve an estimated 450 - 500 patients a day, and help to train Haiti's next generation of doctors, nurses and medical workers.

*******

September 2011 Update:

Wiring moving along quickly, hospital to have power in late September

Work is moving along quickly at the Mirebalais National Teaching Hospital. Hurricane Irene passed by with little more disturbance than rain luckily. The electrical crew has arrived and is making impressive progress.

Wiring in major parts of the new facility is now in place.

Wiring in major parts of the new facility is now in place.

This week the crew completed running conduit and pulling wire in the Outpatient, Women’s Clinic, Community Health, Endoscopy and Pharmacy buildings. Furthermore, they have finished the Main Electrical Room switchgear in building 4.1 (mechanical, kitchen and laundry) and have begun running conduit and installing panel boxes in building 2.1 (labor and delivery).

All this was done in less than three weeks. Also, thanks to the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) we will have permanent power to the site within 10 days!

The wall tile in the kitchen is complete and the crew can now start on the floor tile. Once the tile is complete, they will be able to start installing cabinetry and equipment. The tile work is almost complete in multiple bathrooms, including those of Outpatient, Women’s Clinic and Community Health.

In late August, Paul Farmer made a visit to the site. This was a very exciting day for everyone as they were happy to be able to show him the progress that has been made. 

 

With tiles up, the walls begin to look more like a hospital.

With tiles up, the walls begin to look more like a hospital.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Joanna Stavropoulos on June 13, 2011

Savane Pistache Market Inauguration

“This is not a marketplace, this is a piece of art,” said the President of the Republic of Haiti, Michele Martelly in regard to the Savané Pistache Market in Carrefour-Feuilles, Port-au-Prince.

The Savané Pistache market was inaugurated today at an event hosted by CHF International, the implementers of the project. With President Martelly, Kenneth H. Merten, the US Ambassador in Haiti; Yves Muscadin Jason, Mayor of Port-au-Prince; Alberto Wilde, Country Director of CHF International Haiti; Claude Pierre-Louise, Executive Director of SOGEBANK Foundation, Henry Morand, United Nations Development Program Representative; and Eliana Nicoloni, Project Initiator partook in the inauguration. The event also welcomed hundreds of Savané Pistache Market vendors and community members.

President Martelly began his visit by touring the grounds of the multi-level, handicap accessible market. Weaving through the pavilions painted in bright, primary colors, Mr. Wilde impressed upon President Martelly the environmentally-friendly elements of the market; including, an on-site rainwater harvesting system and links to the UNDP-funded recycling program. 

The President gazed at the rich frescoes that flank the walkways of the open-air, 5,000 square meter market.  The frescoes were painted by graduates of the National Art School and members of the local community. Prizes for the best fresco painting were awarded during the inauguration.

The marketplace was handed over by CHF to the Municipality of Port-au-Prince and COMASAP, an association of 300 members representing the needs of the Savané Pistache community.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Britt Lake on June 03, 2011

Your donation is having an ongoing impact after Haiti's earthquake

Roselette, one of the women from CHF
Roselette, one of the women from CHF's program

A year and a half after the devastating earthquake in Haiti, the effects of the damage are still being felt.  Immediate relief emergency activities are winding down, and organizations supported through your donation to the GlobalGiving Haiti fund are investing more in their long-term rebuilding efforts in the country. From injury rehabilitation centers to infrastructure rebuilding, these organizations are working to improve conditions for all those affected in the country.  And they are having an impact of the lives of many.

Roselette Dupervil, 23, is one of those impacted by your donation.  Roselette had always dreamed of becoming a civil engineer, but never had the opportunity to pursue these studies.  After the earthquake she heard about a program that CHF International was running to train Haitians in earthquake-affected areas to operate heavy machinery.  Roselette joined the program and is now the only female operator on a construction team removing the rubble that still remains throughout the country.  

“I love being on my engine and working,” says Roselette. “What I love most is land boring to make roads, making the openings. I get a great feeling of satisfaction when they give me a plan to go bore a way through the foot of a mountain.  It is difficult work with a mountain that has a lot of cliffs, but one has to do it.”

From providing medical supplies to preparing for the upcoming hurricane season, the organizations that your donation helped support are working hard to rebuild Haiti.  Below is a short update about some of these activities:

Deep Springs International is currently serving over 40,000 families by giving chlorine to purify their water. Through this work they are providing jobs for over 260 Haitians and helping to curb the cholera outbreak.

International Medical Corps is preparing for the upcoming hurricane season by training doctors and nurses, holding disaster drills at local hospitals, employing the “train the trainer” to spread emergency response information to churches, schools, and community members. They are also fighting the cholera outbreak by operating cholera treatment centers.

The Lambi Fund of Haiti is implementing the use of the oxen plowing system with local Haitian peasant farmers to improve crop seasons.

Save the Children is constructing safer school for Haitian children that are more hurricane and earthquake resistant. These buildings are the first of their kind and will better protect the children who learn within their walls.

VIDA is planning a three-year program to annually ship medical supplies and equipment to hospitals in Haiti. They are also supporting Haitian physicians who are running a clinic that serves about 3,000 people.

MADRE is working with its local partner KOFAVIV, which runs a women’s center for rape victims. Sexual violence is on the rise in displacement camps where many earthquake survivors currently live.  The KOFAVIV center provides counseling to help these women recover.

International Medical Corps
International Medical Corps
Deep Springs International
Deep Springs International

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Michael Ritter on May 27, 2011

Lasting Impact on Safe Water in Rural Haiti

DSI Supervisor testing a family
DSI Supervisor testing a family's water

The effects of the earthquake are still being felt over a year later.  DSI’s model of locally driven social enterprises has shown itself to be both scalable and sustainable.  The past year has allowed us many opportunities to enter new communities, forge partnerships with institutions which will be fighting unsafe water for years to come, and learn lessons about how best to make our efforts sustainable.  Despite fluctuations in aid that has been available to communities we serve, our Haitian agents have continued providing access to safe water.

Our current programs serve over 40,000 families with chlorine on an ongoing basis.  Not only do our efforts save lives, but the increased operations have provided jobs for over 260 Haitians to produce and distribute bottles of chlorine.  In order to sustain these economic opportunities and make continued health impact, it is critical that local agents promote healthy behaviors and use of chlorine to treat drinking water.  Your support is greatly appreciated as we empower these agents to strive for change that will become a part of daily life for rural Haitian families. 

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on May 23, 2011

Improving Emergency Response in Haiti

International Medical Corps
International Medical Corps' Staff, Haiti 2011

Dear supporter,

As you know, while it’s impossible to prevent natural disasters, careful planning and preparation can greatly reduce their impact.  It’s the same reason that we practice fire drills in school: when there is an emergency, we know we’re ready. 

With hurricane season approaching, we’ve been partnering with the government, local doctors and nurses, and communities to ensure that they too will be ready.

Here are just a few ways in which we’re improving emergency response:

  • At the University Hospital in Port-au-Prince, we’re training 100 nurses and 50 doctors on Emergency Medicine.  The month-long course will prepare them to work in a hospital emergency department. 
  • Additionally, International Medical Corps has held disaster drills at the three district hospitals of Jacmel, Mirogoane, and Petit Goave.
  • Using a “train-the-trainer” curriculum, we’ve taught hundreds of first-responders on disaster response. These individuals have provided this training to others, helping to educate schools, churches, and communities on emergency response.
  • Cholera prevention is a crucial aspect of disaster preparedness in Haiti.  Our 7 cholera treatment centers have treated thousands of patients since the initial outbreak in 2010.  In addition, our trained community health volunteers are promoting key health education messages, including cholera prevention, within their own communities. 
  • In addition, we’ve carried out an Essential Trauma Care course in Jacmel to provide training for physicians and nurses. 

Our commitment to Haiti is long-term; we plan to help build a sustainable health system that can withstand myriad emergencies.  Your generosity has made our work possible – thank you.

All the best,

International Medical Corps

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on April 25, 2011

Planting seeds, growing food for tomorrow

Oxen ready to plow fields
Oxen ready to plow fields

It is an important time of year in Haiti – its planting season.  Lambi Fund members throughout Haiti are gearing up to plant crops and maximize the use of their land.  Thanks to invaluable support by donors like you, these Haitian farmers are ready to utilize numerous improve agriculture methods.  For instance, ROJETAT is excited to utilize the use of ox-plows to cultivate and prepare their land.  Newly purchased oxen and a plow will help these members plow their fields in a timely and efficient manner.  Previous years’ planting seasons have been a stressful and back-breaking time for Haitians who were left to plow their fields by hand using hoes.  The introduction of an ox-plow service is quickly making this tough reality a thing of the past!

Help continue to support Haitian peasants like members of ROJETAT as they strive for improved methods to cultivate their fields and increase crop outputs.  Empowering entire communities towards greater self-sufficiency and food security is an investment well made. 

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Megan McLain on April 18, 2011

Quality Education and Safer Schools in Haiti

Raising the quality of education and constructing safer schools for Haiti's children are at the center of Save the Children's plans for creating lasting change.

The Institut Abellard in Léogâne is a model of innovative construction techniques that make the school structure more hurricane and earthquake-resistant and therefore safer for the children who learn within its walls.  This school is the first of its kind and serves as an example of best practices of design and construction.  The techniques have been studied by both private builders and non-governmental organizations as a prototype for building other schools around the country.

Attached please find Save the Children's most recent report on education and school construction programs in Haiti.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on April 13, 2011

Haiti Cholera Impact Continues

WaterBrick containers in use in Haiti
WaterBrick containers in use in Haiti

WaterBrick containers continue to be distributed to other remote areas of Haiti to families in dire need.  WaterBricks, now used by families as their portable pantries, are being distributed by not only  the Love A Child Foundation, but also by World Vision and Partners in Health.   The picture here shows our WaterBrick container being used to collect water at one of their well sites.  Continuing to distribute WaterBricks for clean water and food storage while providing bleach for sanitation, is key in helping Haiti recover from not only its devastation, but also its current outbreak of cholera.

The BBC reported in March, that the cholera outbreak is said to be far worse than was originally predicted and that it will take far longer to control.  In fact, "latest figures show there have been 252,640 cases and 4,672 deaths.”  A spokesman for the World Health Organization said, “We really need to reconstruct water and sanitation systems for the cholera epidemic to go away completely.  It's a long-term process and cholera is going to be around for a number of years yet."  But the researchers say thousands of lives could be saved by provision of clean water, vaccination and expanded access to antibiotics.

 Your continued support is greatly appreciated.  If you have any questions and would like to contact us directly, e-mail us at info@waterbrick.org or call us at 877-420-9283.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Joanna Stavropoulos on March 14, 2011

Women Rubble Removers Help Rebuild Haiti

Roselette
Roselette

Ever since she was a little girl, Germaine Fils-Aime, now 31, dreamed of driving one of the big construction machines. But, she was only able to study pastry making and soon was married and had two children.

It was actually Germaine’s husband who heard of the program to train heavy machinery operators and told her about it. This program was set up through a partnership between Haytrack, Caterpillar’s authorized dealer in Haiti, and CHF International which with USAID funds was implementing workforce development programs in Haiti.

“My husband told me about the initiative and encouraged me to take the course,” said Germaine. Her family was also very encouraging.

“The day I got the entry exam results and I saw that I succeed I was so happy and proud. Most women study things like secretarial jobs but I wanted to make a difference and learn how to pilot one of these heavy machineries,” explains Germaine.

Roselette Dupervil, 23, had dreamed of becoming a civil engineer but never had the opportunity to study this. When she heard about the Haytrack-CHF training she decided to join since it was in the same domain.

Roselette says that her male colleagues accepted the female trainees and anyway “the women were much more intelligent than the men in the course,” she says smiling.

Both Germaine and Roselette are now operating heavy machinery for construction companies in Haiti. Both are the only female operators where they work. “My colleagues respect my work and appreciate and respect me a lot especially since I am the only female on the team,” says Roselette.

“I am the only female working in the heavy machinery,” says Germaine, “the other women work in more feminine sections of the company.”

Both Germaine’s and Roselette’s family are proud of their work. “My husband shows off about his wife being an operator,” says Germaine laughing.

“I love being on my engine and working,” says Roselette. “What I love most is land boring to make roads, making the openings. I get a great feeling of satisfaction when they give me a plan to go bore a way through the foot of a mountain,” nods Roselette. “It is difficult work with a mountain that has a lot of cliffs, but one has to do it.”

“What I love,” says Germaine, “is when I’m at a worksite and I have to fill up all the trucks that line up. You know, all the boys look at me doing a truly professional job and I love that a lot.”

“I would be extremely proud to see my daughter enter the same profession as me,” adds Germaine speaking of her seven-year old daughter. She thinks that more women should enter this profession and thus, “prove that they can work as hard as any man.” Looking at her daughter, Germaine says, “I am sure she will be successful – but of course,” she adds, “it is up to her to decide what she wants to be in the future.”

“I still dream of becoming a civil engineer,” says Roselette. “But I adore this work and I now dream of becoming the best operator and being a professional that works with all her heart.”

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam G See on March 15, 2011

It is tough going in Haiti as VIDA supports 3 hospitals with help from 3 Doctors

In the immediate aftermath of the devastating earthquake in Haiti, VIDA quickly responded by airlifting two containers carrying $2.0 million in medical emergency relief into Haiti's triage supply chain. This was made possible by the generous support of Global Giving members. VIDA is now focusing on rebuilding the long-term healthcare delivery systems in Haiti's remote communities and assisting a physician’s group who is making quarterly visits to Haiti to support a clinic in Cayes Jacmal.

VIDA is still in the planning phase of a three year program to annually ship twelve containers of medical supplies and equipment to hospitals in Petit-Goave, Paillant and Miragoane. These hospitals were decimated in the quake and serve hundreds of thousands of Haiti's poorest citizens. VIDA has chosen these three hospitals because they are operating in regions underserved by relief efforts. The need for healthcare is becoming even more acute as temporary clinics are being dismantled as emergency aid organizations have winded down their operations.

VIDA is also currently supporting a medical team headed by Haitian born physician, Alix J.Magloire who is the Chief of Medicine at the Oakland Veterans Administration Clinic. Dr. Magloire, and two other Haitian born physicians have spent two 15 day shifts at a healthcare center in Cayes Jacmal and will be returning once again in June 2011. The clinic has eight observation beds, urgent care unit, and six operating rooms. The clinic serves 3,000 patients. Many walk up to 3 hours to receive care. Arriving at the clinic in the morning, they are met by long-lines of people to receive treatment. They are treating people for infectious diseases such as malaria, gastro intestinal disease, cardiac, metabolic diseases and orthopedic issues. Infectious diseases run rampant due to poor infrastructure and clean water. Even before the earthquake, access to medical care had always been scarce. These Doctors spend long days and nights caring for patients. There is little time for sleep. VIDA has provided multiple small shipments of equipment that the doctors bring with them on their visit. Shipments have included several endoscopy, ultrasound, anesthesia, ECG and dialysis machines.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on March 14, 2011

Earthquake Recovery - Community Rehab Programs

Following the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Partners In Health (PIH) and our Haitian sister organization Zanmi Lasante (ZL) immediately began to both respond to immediate medical needs and plan for the long-term recovery and rebuilding of Haiti's public health system. Now, nearly 15 months after the earthquake, PIH/ZL's focus is on these long-term programs, including our community-based rehabilitative medicine program.

In general, patients have sustained one of four types of injuries: a closed fracture which will need follow-up x-rays and cast changes; an open fracture, which requires wound care in addition to typical fracture care; an amputated limb, which often requires additional surgical procedures for prosthesis fittings; or permanent neurological disabilities, which include spine fractures, spinal cord injuries or paralysis. No matter what the injury, these patients require specialized rehabilitation. Recovering from a fracture means not only learning how to walk with a crutch, but also retraining muscles, ligaments and tendons to walk again. Patients who have had limbs amputated or who have been permanently disabled will need occupational therapy to learn how to live with their disability, in addition to ongoing physical therapy to strengthen their muscles. Patients who underwent life-saving surgeries in the aftermath of the earthquake will require months, and in some cases years, of follow-up and aftercare.

PIH/ZL’s Community-Based Rehabilitative Medicine Program has two main components: Clinical Care and Community-Based Care. When an injured patient first comes to one of PIH/ZL's hospitals or clinics, they are seen by a clinician, who then refers appropriate patients to the rehabilitative team. A doctor of rehabilitative medicine handles all medical issues related to this disability. After a complete evaluation, the rehab doctor develops a care plan, 90% of which takes places outside of the hospital with PIH/ZL's team of community health workers. In cases of extreme injury, patients are reffered as inpatients to PIH/ZL's rehabilitation clinic (currently in Cange, while a state-of-the-art rehab center is being planned and constructed in St. Marc).

Back in the community, each patient is visited regularly by a home visit team, a three-member unit: a rehab doctor and/or nurse (for clinical support), a rehab technician (for physical and other rehab therapies), and a rehabilitation educator, who is a community health worker (CHW) who has been specially trained to tend to the needs of people with disabilities. Throughout this time, the patient's CHW visits him or her daily to monitor the patient’s state, providing in-home support and accompaniment throughout the healing process.

Thank you so much for your support of Partners In Health's earthquake relief and recovery programs. If you wish to continue supporting these types of programs, be sure to take advantage of the GlobalGiving Bonus Day on March 16! All donations made on 3/16 will be matched at 30% (up to $1,000 per donor)!

For video on our rehab program, click below:

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Provide Medicine to Earthquake Victims in Haiti

By Maria Trimble on March 01, 2011

Visiting KOFAVIV: A Refuge for Rape Survivors

 

On a recent trip by MADRE staff, we visited our partners at KOFAVIV.

KOFAVIV and MADRE have co-founded “The KOFAVIV Women’s Center” a refuge  that provides essential services for rape survivors. The center has become a critical resource for the women it serves. Women who arrive at the center traumatized by an attack immediately are cared for by KOFAVIV members, who accompany rape survivors to urgent medical care and legal services.

Many of the girls who use the center are orphans and are forced into survival sex to provide themselves with the most basic daily necessities, such as food or a sliver of soap. With even a little support, like a pair of flip flops or the promise of a meal, KOFAVIV is able to pull these girls out of that cycle. KOFAVIV also provides counseling, human rights trainings and arts programming, to help women and girls on the path to rebuilding their lives.

Since the earthquake, Haitian women have faced an epidemic of sexual violence in the displacement camps of Port-au-Prince. Every day, new women who have survived rape arrive at the KOFAVIV Women’s Center. Over half of these cases of rape involve girls under the age of 17—the youngest rape survivor we met was 4 years old. Since September, the KOFAVIV Center has treated more than 350rape survivors, and every week, 400 women come for peer-to-peer counseling sessions.

But many obstacles remain. Malya Villard-Appolon, one of the leaders of KOFAVIV, told us that one of the young girls had stopped attending the peer-to-peer counseling sessions. Concerned for her well-being, they sought her out in the displacement camp where she lives. She told them that she had stopped coming to the trainings because she had lost her only pair of shoes and couldn’t make the walk to the Center.  For other women and girls, the inability to afford the cost of transportation throughout Port-au-Prince keeps them from visiting the center, and KOFAVIV has launched a concerted but difficult effort to help cover these costs.

To help bring their services to women and girls, KOFAVIV is hoping to move more of their workshops into the displacement camps. The plan is to start new workshops in seven camps with 40 girls in each.  Eventually, as they grow through the mentorship of KOFAVIV’s leaders, these girls will also become role models for other young girls struggling to heal from rape.

Your support helps make KOFAVIV’s life-saving services possible – thank you.

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Britt Lake on February 15, 2011

GlobalGiving visits Internews in Haiti

Internews
Internews' research staff in Port-au-Prince

The day after the one year anniversary of the earthquake my colleague, Marisa , and I rode up the hill to the Hotel Montana to meet Internews’ staff.  The Hotel Montana, previously one of the nicest hotels in Port-au-Prince had collapsed during the earthquake, killing and injuring several people inside.  When we arrived the main part of the hotel had been completely destroyed, although most of the rubble cleared in the past year.

 

A downstairs portion, including a conference room, remained in tact.  For the week of the one-year anniversary of the earthquake, Internews set up a temporary journalist station in this conference room where both local and international journalists could come to learn, write, and post their stories.  “Half of the time journalists spend in this country is just working out logistics – finding power, internet, etc,” said Phillip Allouard, Internews’ Haiti Country Director.  Each day, they brought in experts from the country about different topics to present to the journalist present.  They covered topics like the cholera outbreak and the reconstruction efforts in the country.

 

Internews’ mission is to empower local media worldwide to give people the news and information they need, the ability to connect, and the means to make their voices heard..  Their first program, ENDK, produces a 15-20 minute informational radio program six days a week to provide Haitians with information they need on topics like where they can access health care, employment opportunities, and disease prevention and treatment.  This program is currently run on about 40 community radio stations throughout the country.  As evidence of their reach, a recent study of the program’s target areas found that 100% of people surveyed had not only heard the program, but could cite specific examples of useful information they had gained from listening.

 

Internews works hard to make sure that the information they’re providing is what Haitians actually want to hear.  They’ve created a research unit that has grown to almost 20 employees in the past several months.  The research unit originated to identify and track the information needs of the communities they serve.  They have found that across the board – from the time of the earthquake to now – people want health-related information.  Internews has responded with information about where people can access clinics, what symptoms indicate illnesses like cholera, malaria, and typhoid, and what people can do to prevent illness.  Their research has become so respected that other organizations, including government officials and other non-profit organizations, have begun paying for access to the information.  One long-term possibility is to turn this research unit into an information consulting business run by Haitians even after Internews is no longer involved.

 

Jennifer Mandel, Deputy Country Director, believes that one of the biggest impacts Internews will have on the country is the lasting training and capacity building they have been carrying out throughout the past year.  As funding for the radio program winds down, the journalists and researchers they’ve trained throughout the last year will remain in the country, continuing to provide high-quality research and reporting to rebuild Haiti in the future.

ENDK
ENDK's radio equipment

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Britt Lake on January 28, 2011

GlobalGiving visits IMC's clinic in Haiti

IMC staff see patients in Petionville Camp
IMC staff see patients in Petionville Camp

We bumped along the road up the hill to Petionville to visit International Medical Corps’ clinic in the J/P tent camp, where about 50,000 Haitians now live since the earthquake destroyed their homes.  Their clinic is in one of the largest of such camps in Haiti, and specializes in primary care so they see a lot of cases of skin rashes, coughs, and stomach problems.  Another specialized hospital is also in the camp, where they refer more serious medical cases, like cholera.

 

The temporary shelter that IMC built is divided into a few smaller rooms.  On our left, over a dozen patients sat waiting for their check-up.  Children smiled and ran up and down the room while their parents waited to be seen by one of the two Haitian doctors working in the clinic.  Other medical staff took down the details of the patients waiting to be seen.

 

We sat down and spoke to Manuchecka Dajeantal, a pregnant woman who was in the IMC clinic for the first time.  She came with her husband, who was there to see a doctor about a rash on his neck.  She lives near the clinic, and the free care it provides means she can see a doctor about the unusual swelling she’s experiencing in her legs.  She says that if the clinic was not there she wouldn’t see a doctor at all.

 

The doctors at the IMC clinic also keep an eye out for psychological problems that their patients may be facing.  Because of the stigma associated with mental health issues, many people don’t seek care for problems like depression or PTSD, which many earthquake survivors are facing.  This is one of the few clinics specially equipped to deal with these issues, and mental health care is integrated into the primary care that the doctors are already providing.

 

After speaking with the doctors, we walked through the tent camp behind the IMC clinic where we met Leonie Joseph, a woman living in the camp with her husband and two children.  During the earthquake her house collapsed with everything in it.  Luckily her family, which included a three-year-old and a newborn baby, survived.  She is now looking for work and hoping to find a way out of the camp and into a home again.  She says shelter is her number one need.

 

Soon it started to rain, and everyone ran back under their tents.  We ran to our car and got in as the raindrops got larger.  Our car slipped and slid into the mud as we attempted to leave, eventually getting stuck in several inches of mud.  Over the next hour and a half the community came together to help us move the car and get to where we needed to go. 

 

Thank you for supporting International Medical Corps’ efforts in Haiti!

Manuchecka Dajeantal, 19, a patient at the clinic
Manuchecka Dajeantal, 19, a patient at the clinic
Leonie Joseph lives in the camp with her family
Leonie Joseph lives in the camp with her family

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Britt Lake on February 15, 2011

GlobalGiving visit to Deep Springs International

DSI staff prepare bottled chlorine
DSI staff prepare bottled chlorine

We left early from Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital, for the two hour drive to Leogane, where we were meeting with staff from Deep Springs International (DSI).  We arrived on a Saturday and were surprised to find several staff members busily working.  It was bottling day!

 

DSI locally produces a liquid chlorine that makes water safe to drink.  A capful of chlorine purifies five gallons of water for drinking, cooking, and cleaning.  The organization works with community health workers employed by the Ministry of Health to spread the importance of clean water for overall health – a message that becomes even more important with the recent spread of cholera.   For only $1.25, a family of five can receive enough chlorine to have clean drinking water for an entire month.

 

In the past year since the earthquake, DSI has grown from only 40 staff to 240 staff – almost all of whom are Haitian.  We met with Jean Alliance who explained to us how they train staff to educate the community and bring the chlorine solution to families throughout the region.  The sustainability of the project is important, so the solution is sold, with the small profit margin going to the community health workers.  This allows the project to be independent from relying on grants, provides employment in the local community, and reducing health problems among the families who use the system.  Michael Ritter, National Program Officer, says that their studies show that health indicators seem to be improving within families that use the system.  Childhood diarrhea, for instance, has dropped 50% among their clients. 

 

They continue to monitor the affect that DSI’s water systems are having on the area and expand in a smart, sustainable way.  DSI was working in Haiti before the earthquake, and continues to remain dedicated to the expanding in a way that improves health and increases local employment in the region.

Bottles of just-bottled locally produced chlorine
Bottles of just-bottled locally produced chlorine

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Marisa Glassman on January 24, 2011

GlobalGiving Visits Lambi Fund

Banana plants and seedlings
Banana plants and seedlings

Our recent visit to the Lambi Fund’s work outside of Gonaives on January 11, 2011, was my fist venture into the bush of Haiti.  A few hours to the north of Port au Prince, their work was located near beautiful mountains and hills that I’m impressed our truck was able to navigate.  We passed beautiful beaches, banana farms, and rice paddies, and we eventually came to the area outside of Gonaives where Lambi helps a community-based group operate an agricultural co-op.  We first saw the organic plantain nursery they use to grow plants, which they share with a larger community group in somewhat of a credit and barter system.  They do not charge for the pants, which take 8-10 months to grow fruit and sprout 40 plants from one bag/bulb, but rather they give them away to local community groups who plant them, use and/or sell them in turn, and return two new seeds to Lambi for them to cultivate and recycle back into the nursery system. 

 

Not far down the road, we were greeted by roughly thirty members of the community group that benefits from this system.  There were representatives from each of about a dozen local groups who participate in this co-op.  In addition to bananas, they do cereal transformation using the engine they recently obtained to process grains, as well as other agriculture and livestock such as corn and goats.  They hold monthly meetings, during which they determine their greatest  needs, and they are currently focused on obtaining sufficient clean water for the community.  Each family in the group is using a chlorine filtration system at present, but at a cost of 500 goudes per month, that has been cost-prohibitive for the group.  Much of community members lost their livelihoods in the earthquake as well as many of their brightest hopes for the future in the form of local students who’d gone to Port au Prince for university but didn’t survive last January’s earthquake destruction. 

 

Despite the obvious needs of the community, they couldn’t have been more welcoming or proud of the great work that Lambi has helped them achieve to date.  They proudly introduced themselves to us – from the overall community group leader, Etienne Emario, to the women who take care of daily needs of the organization, Chrismene and Paulmimose.  And we greatly benefited from their crops and farming, as Chrismene, Paulmimose, and other women of the group created a beautiful and delicious lunch feast for us.  In addition to this delicious send-off, they provided us with a list of their most pressing office needs, which I have attached to this report for you to see as well. 

One of these bulbs yields about 40 plants
One of these bulbs yields about 40 plants
The bulbs before they
The bulbs before they're treated and planted
The landscape where the community lives
The landscape where the community lives
On the way to Gonaives to meet the community
On the way to Gonaives to meet the community

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on January 18, 2011

With Your Support in 2010

Thank you for your support!
Thank you for your support!

1 year ago, a 7.0 earthquake struck Port-au-Prince.  An estimated 230,000 people lost their lives, thousands more were gravely injured, and a million others were displaced. Even before the earthquake, Haiti suffered from crushing poverty and a weak infrastructure. The country had now become a massive humanitarian crisis. For many Haitians, the past year has been a daily struggle to rebuild their lives.

The pain of the Haitian people should not be diminished but looking back, we believe we have been able to ease some of their suffering. With the help of our amazing supporters, over the last 12 months we have:

•    Conducted more than 156,600 patient consultations.
•    Established 13 clinics and 7 cholera treatment centers.
•    Distributed $16.2M in medicines, supplies, services and equipment donated by our in-kind partners.
•    Screened more than 20,000 children for malnutrition.
•    Trained and employed 1,300 Haitian health care workers and community mobilizers.
•    Treated more than 7,500 patients in our cholera treatment centers.


To read our 1-year accountability report, please click here.


Right now, we are looking toward the future in Haiti. Working hand in hand with the people of Haiti, we’ve expanded our health care services to reach those in need, while implementing critical medical training and education programs. These programs will help Haiti meet its own health care needs in the future, as well as help the Haitian people prepare for future disasters.

Please take a moment to watch all we've accomplished together in 2010.

The 2010 earthquake was an unprecedented disaster that will undoubtedly affect Haiti for years to come. Although the recovery process will be long, we are committed to improving quality of life, fostering self-reliance, and bringing hope to the Haitian people.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Megan McLain on January 07, 2011

Haiti’s Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads

One year after the historic Haitian earthquake, Save the Children is grateful to our global donors for their compassion and generosity in supporting the organization’s immediate relief and recovery efforts for Haitian children and their families. From the in-country teams to Save the Children staff around the world, we are thankful for your support and desire to help the people of Haiti. Your contributions have enabled Save the Children to mount and now sustain the largest humanitarian aid response in the Western Hemisphere in the agency’s 91-year history.

Below please find a link to Save the Children’s report, Haiti’s Children One Year Later: A Country at a Crossroads.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on January 07, 2011

Love A Child Distributes WaterBrick's in Haiti

Love a Child distributing WaterBrick containers
Love a Child distributing WaterBrick containers

Love A Child just distributed more of our interlocking and stackable WaterBrick water and food storage containers in their new Miracle Village in the town of Fond Parisien outside of Port-Au-Prince.  Some earthquake survivors, in the Love A Child Miracle Village, have moved into their newly built homes but many are still living in tents as you can see in the picture attached.

When explaining the need for clean water containers, like WaterBrick, Sherry Burnette with Love A Child said, “this is especially important now since we have a huge Cholera epidemic here in Haiti”.  However, Sherry said that, “this time we packed each WaterBrick with macaroni, oatmeal and cereal” but the families can reuse WaterBrick’s for water and food for many years to come.  When giving them to children, Sherry also noted that, “these WaterBricks are easy for small children to carry to their home or their hut”.

Since the Haiti earthquake on January 12th of last year, we continue to raise donations to provide clean WaterBrick water and food containers, 8,400 distributed so far, and have provided 3,500 gallons of bleach and chlorine to help fight the Cholera outbreak.  To date, over 3,400 people have died due to the Cholera outbreak and it actually accelerated in December so the need is still great.

Your continued support is greatly appreciated.  If you have any questions and would like to contact us directly, e-mail us at info@waterbrick.org or call us at 877-420-9283.

Love a Child distributing WaterBrick containers
Love a Child distributing WaterBrick containers
Haitian children carrying WaterBricks
Haitian children carrying WaterBricks
Tent City prior to new Love A Child Homes
Tent City prior to new Love A Child Homes

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Adam G See on December 20, 2010

VIDA's 2010 Medical Relief Update - Haiti Earthquake, Chile Earthquake, and Peru Earthquake

Dear Friends of VIDA,

As 2010 comes to a close, VIDA wishes you a joyous holiday season. As we reflect on the past twelve months, and count our many blessings, we are mindful that our world has lived through a year of tremendous challenges and suffering. Devastating earthquakes in Chile and Haiti unleashed indescribable destruction upon these nations. And, as always, it is the poor who suffer most. However, in this time of need, we witnessed the boundless generosity of everyday people who answered the call to ease the pain and despair of their fellow human beings. This year, donors from the Global Giving community were vital in helping VIDA respond to the crises. We write you today, to thank you for your support, and to update you on our mission.

For hundreds of thousands of people living in poverty, VIDA is the embodiment of our nation’s philanthropic spirit. Because of the support from Global Giving donors, VIDA quickly responded to these emergencies by shipping containers to Haiti and Chile carrying over $9 million in medical aid. From bandages to surgical kits, wheelchairs to hospital beds, VIDA helped deliver lifesaving medical care to devastated communities such as Petit Goala in Haiti and Pichilemu in Chile. VIDA is currently working on implementing a long-term solution for rural communities in Haiti and Chile that have little, or no, healthcare infrastructure before or after the earthquakes. VIDA is an outstanding steward of your generosity. For every $1 you donated, VIDA sent $150 in life-saving medical aid to Haiti and Chile.

In good times and in bad, access to healthcare remains a daily challenge confronting the poor in Latin America. Since our founding in 1991, VIDA has played an important role in bridging this gap. VIDA has shipped over 325 containers carrying over $450 million in aid and has diverted over 1,000 tons of viable medical supplies from landfills. In spite of the difficult economic environment, 2010 is shaping up to be a record year for VIDA. We are on pace to send 32 containers carrying over $35 million in aid to projects in Latin America.

VIDA Peru is an inspiring example of our commitment to serve communities long after a disaster has struck. In 2010, VIDA Peru has distributed supplies and equipment to over 250 institutions throughout Peru’s 12 regions. Of special note is Puente de VIDA which provides free primary medical care and education to Peru’s most remote communities in the Amazon, Andes, and Coastal Deserts through our mobile clinics. This year, Puente de VIDA served a record 24 communities, up from 16 in 2009. For many of our clients, this was their first access to healthcare.

To build on our successes, the VIDA Board is setting the bar even higher. We have an ambitious goal of shipping 40 containers in 2011 and 50 in 2012.

The mission of VIDA honors the dignity of every individual. No child should suffer because they cannot afford to have a wound properly bandaged. No elderly person should have to convalesce on a broken cot because there is no hospital bed. No human being should die because they cannot afford basic medical care. We are exceedingly grateful to all of our supporters who have so generously given their time, talents, and treasures to help VIDA bring healthcare to impoverished people in Latin America.

We hope that you will continue to join us in helping to bring the gift of VIDA to those in greatest need.

Sincerely,

Haydee Rodriguez-Pastor                                                       Adam G See

President                                                                                 Executive Director

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on December 09, 2010

Haiti Earthquake Recovery - PIH Annual Report 2010

When the earthquake struck Haiti on January 12, Zanmi Lasante was uniquely positioned both to provide emergency care and to help develop and implement plans for long-term reconstruction. ZL provided life-saving care to thousands of injured people, opened clinics to serve more than 100,000 people in four spontaneous settlement camps, and launched a $125-million plan to help rebuild Haiti's public health and health education systems.

By the numbers:

  • 2,961 earthquake victims received emergency care at ZL hospitals during the first month after the earthquake
  • 146,940 patient visits at ZL clinics in four spontaneous settlements
  • 733 volunteers sent to Haiti, including 312 nurses and 239 physicians
  • 1.5 million pounds of supplies moved to Haiti
  • 30,000 children under 5 examined and treated at clinics in settlements
  • 12,000 women seen at sante fanm (women's health) tents in settlement clinics
  • 4,247 psychosocial and mental health services delivered in settlement clinics
  • 500 displaced children enrolled at ZL-supported schools
  • 1,000 vulnerable families trained in innovative farming techniques

Highlights from the response:

Provided emergency care for earthquake victims

In the first hours after the earthquake, Zanmi Lasante took immediate action to provide emergency medical care to earthquake victims both in Port-au-Prince and at our facilities in the Central Plateau and Lower Artibonite. ZL medical and engineering staff arrived at the badly damaged general hospital in Port-au-Prince just after the quake, where they helped restore electricity, deployed volunteer surgical teams and urgently needed supplies, and worked with partners to get 12 operating rooms up and running around the clock.

As thousands of injured people fled the ruined capital, ZL opened up new emergency wards and brought in volunteer orthopedic teams to help perform emergency surgeries at four of our largest facilities in central Haiti. In the first four weeks after the earthquake, these facilities delivered life-saving medical care to 2,961 patients with earthquake-related injuries.

Provided comprehensive primary care for displaced communities

Just two weeks after the earthquake, ZL set up health clinics to serve over 100,000 displaced people living in four spontaneous settlement camps around Port-au-Prince. ZL's clinics provide comprehensive primary health care and social support services — including maternal and child health, reproductive care, HIV and TB testing, mental health care, and malnutrition treatment — to roughly 10,000 people each week.


Each clinic is staffed by a team of Haitian physicians, nurses, psychologists, pharmacists, and lab technicians. ZL also trained and hired local residents to serve as community health workers at each location, improving outreach into the settlements and providing jobs and income.

Strengthened specialized clinical services to meet the needs of earthquake survivors

Many of the more than 300,000 people wounded by the earthquake suffered crush wounds, compound fractures, spinal injuries and other severe injuries that will require ongoing and specialized rehabilitation. Tens of thousands more were scarred emotionally by the loss of family members and friends, homes and livelihoods. To meet their needs, ZL more than doubled the size of our rehabilitative medicine and mental health teams. By the end of June, the physical therapy team had distributed 400 wheelchairs and was providing care to 50 people with amputations. The mental health and psychosocial support team had offered more than 4,200 support services in spontaneous settlements, including psycho-education, counseling, and individual and group therapy.

Broke ground for a new national teaching hospital

In partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Health, PIH/ZL is building a world-class, 320-bed teaching hospital in Mirebalais. The new hospital will train the next generation of Haitian doctors, nurses, and lab technicians, equipping them to take on the challenges of rebuilding and strengthening the Haitian health care system. When its doors open in late 2011, the Mirebalais hospital will be Haiti's largest public hospital outside Port-au-Prince. It will house clinical facilities not currently available in Haiti, including an intensive care unit and six operating rooms, and will contribute to the national goal of decentralizing services, including both clinical care and education for health professionals.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Megan McLain on December 02, 2010

Update on Save the Children's programs in Haiti

Haiti: Gaston Margron camp
Haiti: Gaston Margron camp

Since the epic earthquake in Haiti, Save the Children has worked nonstop to alleviate children’s suffering and ensure their well-being.

  • In the immediate aftermath of the disaster, nearly 490 children who were separated from their families were provided with family tracing, reunification, or mediation support.
  • Nearly 10,000 children have attended Child Friendly Spaces, where they could play, learn, and develop in a protective environment.
  • Over 43,440 children are learning in temporary classrooms.
  • Nearly 31,250 children and members of their families received tents, plastic sheeting, shelter kits and other non-food items to set up temporary shelters.
  • Young children are regularly screened and treated for malnourishment.
  • We are combating the spread of cholera in camps of earthquake-displaced families.

Rachelle’s story: Haiti

In the ”baby tent,” established by Save the Children in Leogane, Haiti, one-month-old infant twins and their mother, Rachelle, have a quiet and safe place to breastfeed, an oasis from the crowded camp outside. “It’s my first time here, and I am hoping to receive some advice for taking care of my babies,” said Rachelle. “I am not getting enough to eat and I need support as these are my first children.” In addition to providing a protected place, the tents serve as a center for breastfeeding support groups as many mothers are having difficulty feeding their infants since the quake. Tent staff also monitor and treat children with acute malnutrition. 

As in any emergency, infants and young children are the most vulnerable survivors of the disaster in Haiti. Breastfeeding is an affordable and vital way to help keep them alive and healthy.

Rachelle:  Leogane, Haiti
Rachelle: Leogane, Haiti

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Haiti Water Relief

By Kevin Adams on November 28, 2010

Haiti Update from TEDx Peachtree

Here is a speech update of WaterBrick's involvement and continued assessment of the needs in Haiti.  This speech was given at TEDx Peachtree on November 5, 2010 in Atlanta.  TED is a great world-wide non-profit organization that hosts day long local events, called TEDx, featuring speakers that have "Ideas Worth Spreading".  We were asked to keep it under 10 minutes so we focused on the main points over the 10 months we have been involved.  Check out our speech update at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlVh_YJ3Mb8.

For any questions or new ideas on how we can create partnerships and provide help in Haiti, contact us at info@waterbrick.org as we welcome your feedback.  As an example, we have partnered with Global Giving, Love A Child, Dow Chemical, and Brenntag.  Brenntag just answered our call by providing 2,700 gallons of bleach (in addition to our bleach donation of 1,000 gallons) to help stop the cholera outbreak for example.  We are in the process of creating partnerships with Clean the World, Partners in Health and MAP International to create synergy that accelerates help for the many needs in Haiti.

Have ideas that could help us in our Haiti efforts?  Reach out and let us know your thoughts at info@waterbrick.org.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Leonie Hermantin on November 24, 2010

11 Months Later, Recovery Continues in Haiti

Children in Northwest Haiti
Children in Northwest Haiti

Haitian Farmers Report:

"The Lambi Fund Saves Lives!"

In an effort to assess the lingering impact of the January 12, 2010 earthquake on Haiti's rural communities, the Lambi Fund of Haiti's team of staff and board members embarked on a fact finding journey which took them to the departments of the Artibonite and the Northwest. Post-earthquake statistics indicate that over 600,000 internationally displaced persons (IDPs) left Port-au-Prince and migrated en masse to Haiti's provinces with a great majority heading for the Artibonite, the North and the Northwest.

The first stop in an itinerary that took us from Port-au-Prince to Haiti's most Northwestern town, Mole St. Nicholas, was at the Center for Plantain Propagation where we met with members of two partner organizations, Peasants Organization of Gwo Mon and Peasants Organization of Sél (AGPGM and APS). The meeting's agenda as set by the organizations included discussions about Lambi Fund's emergency assistance campaign and the work implemented at the Center.

As anticipated, we were all touched by moving accounts of earthquake stories shared by all. We heard of the tears shed over fallen relatives and neighbors.

We were all moved by the narratives of solidarity and mutual support extended to total strangers who walked into their lives traumatized, wounded and seeking support. Our partners told the stories that we would hear along the way. Stories of communities overwhelmed by refugees, men and women eager to help but wondering how they would all survive with their meager supplies of food and water, in the absence of any type of assistance.

Mr. Josephat, a member of APS recalled tearfully:

"I had 21 people, strangers staying with me and my family. We did not think twice about welcoming them, but we had not yet figured out how they would be cared for or how they would be fed.

When we heard about Lambi Fund's program to help impacted families, I was so happy that I cried. I cried because I was touched and shocked that people who had been at the center of this disaster had the time to think about us.

I was so proud to be a member of a strong organization, and I really deeply understood why being organized is the path to a better life. We would have been left to our own devices without Lambi Fund's support.

The government never came and the NGOs which did drop by brought free food supplies and their methods of distribution stripped us of our dignity."

His sentiments were echoed throughout our visits in the Northwest. Haitian peasants continued to reiterate that Lambi Fund delivered aid respectfully through the direct engagement of partner communities.

Phase II: Expanding Food Production

Reports from all communities visited confirmed that the second phase of Lambi Fund's emergency assistance program focusing on food production and food security was a total success. Nearly all farmers from Gwo Mon to Gwo Sab shared their success stories of fast growing cultivation within two months of the earthquake. Thanks to Lambi Fund's support, partner communities generated bountiful harvests of peas, vegetables and corn for consumption and sale at local markets.

In Mawotyé, farmers were less successful with the Emergency Fund's second phase because they purchased most of their seeds from a government agency which was selling hybrid seeds donated by the international community. This unfortunate deviation from their tradition of acquiring local seeds proved very costly. According to disappointed farmers, with the exception of corn cultivation, the harvest for peas, okra, millet and other vegetables was dismal. The farmers said that they have learned their lesson and will return to purchasing local seeds.

In all communities visited, farmers reported that their ongoing projects were now proceeding on-course following justifiable post-earthquake interruptions. In Gwo Mon, activities related to plantain production, sale and processing were going strong.

"I was so proud to be a member of a strong organization, and I really deeply understood why being organized is a path to a better life."

Members of KFTK-NW in Remon, spoke of the importance of the Lambi Fund's support immediately following the earthquake and the Second Phase of assistance focusing on food security and sustainability. In Gwo Sab, farmers, fishermen and market women thanked Lambi Fund for its support of their efforts to modernize their fishing practices and to capitalize the women's microcredit fund. Members enumerated in very somber tones the names of all the men who perished at sea in the past - victims to the elements and the rudimentary boats they used for fishing. Gwo Sab's collaboration with Lambi Fund has resulted in the purchase of new motor boats, is saving lives and helping build a more sustainable future for their community.

Moving Forward

This trip into the Artibonite and Northwestern parts of Haiti illustrated the undeniable fact that Haiti's farmers rightly reflect the post-earthquake psyche of those in urban communities. Haitians, throughout the entire country, are all overcoming the immense trauma of January's earthquake.

Like their urban counterparts in Port-au-Prince, Haitian farmers are determined to be part of their country's reconstruction. Lambi Fund is proud to be a tool which will assist them in the realization of these dreams and visions for a stronger Haiti. In addition to continuing our support of sustainable economic and environmental activities, Lambi Fund has pledged to amplify these voices and their determination to be included in this historic moment for nation building in Haiti.

Haitian women cooking
Haitian women cooking

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Joanna Stavropoulos on November 11, 2010

Advance Preparation Reduces Post- Tomas Flooding

Camelita Cadet with the canal that saved her home
Camelita Cadet with the canal that saved her home

Camélita Cadet, 40, had a very different experience with Hurricane Tomas than in previous hurricanes: this time, she did not have to evacuate or find her belongings buried under mud when she returned. “The water just flowed through the canals without causing any damage to the area,” says Camélita. She lives near Bienac canal in Gonaives, which was constructed by CHF International with USAID funds.

In previous years, the northern city of Gonaives was one of the most badly affected when tropical storms or hurricanes hit Haiti. Thousands of people lost their lives in 2004 when Hurricane Jeanne hit, and countless more were affected by Hurricanes Hanna and Ike in 2008. On a regular basis, homes were submerged in mud and the roads became impassable.

This year, there were no deaths in Gonaives and the damage was minimal despite the 12 inches of rainfall that Tomas brought with it. This success is due to the work that CHF International has done to protect Gonaives from flooding due to tropical storms. In a two-pronged approach, CHF reinforced surrounding slopes and ravines by planting over 230,000 trees and building more than 100,000 cubic meters of erosion-preventing dry-stone walls, while at the same time building over 15,500 linear meters of drainage canals. These lead to three main canals: Bassin, Bienac and Bigot, that drain into the sea. Additionally, CHF built five main roads which are sloped to help drain stagnant water along the sides, and an artificial lake was expanded in order to hold 16,000 cubic meters of water.

“Every rainy season before the completion of this project, all the homes along the Bassin road would be flooded,” says Jean Philippe Sejourne, 49, and President of the Bassin Community Association, “and all the commerce and traffic would be blocked.” “Now,” he says, “our quality of life is better and in the name of the community that I represent I would like to thank those who have done this work.”

Roland Poncelet, the CHF Field Office Director in Gonaives, points out that despite the great amount of rainfall there was no major damage to the city. “This time there was some flooding due to water, but no mud,” explains Roland. “Especially important is that the new Bassin canal prevented National Road No. 1 from flooding; all the water was canalized through Bienac and down to the ocean.” The Bassin canal is located above the entrance to the city, a spot previously affected by water running off the mountain ravines surrounding the area. The canal now diverts the water before it can enter. Additionally, the third Bigot canal channeled a huge amount of water without any reported damage.

 “Good job!” said Camélita enthusiastically when asked about the drainage canals built near her home. “I can guarantee you that since the completion of this work, all of us in this zone will take care of this canal as long as it is necessary,” she added happily.

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By David McGinty on November 08, 2010

Meeting Tomas and Cholera with Expansion

Leogane after Tomas - Waves in the Streets
Leogane after Tomas - Waves in the Streets

This week Hurricane Tomas hit Haiti at a critical time when Haitians are working to contain the cholera outbreak and continue rebuilding after the January earthquake that drove many into temporary dwellings.  The cholera outbreak alone has claimed more than 440 lives and led to the hospitalization of over 6,700 Haitians to date.

The hurricane did not directly hit the earthquake zone, where displaced families would be highly exposed and endangered. However, heavy rains have caused flooding (including a river overwhelming Leogane (pictured)) and may result in mudslides in populated areas and high winds that would damage or destroy makeshift tent shelters. We serve 18,500 families in Leogane.

“Haiti’s children have suffered one disaster on top of another this year,” Trayle Kulshan, UNICEF’s Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Cluster Coordinator, said yesterday.

DSI’s Actions

DSI’s production of Gadyen Dlo (our Haitian-made liquid chlorine) has increased in several communities that we serve based on need and demand.  In Jolivert, this week we provided 20 times the amount of Gadyen Dlo typically demanded.

We have also been producing large quantities of Gadyen Dlo to provide to partner organizations.  For example, MINUSTAH (United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti) is being supplied with 870 gallons of Gadyen Dlo and 500,000 AquaTabs for water treatment in Port-au-Prince.  This Gadyen Dlo supply alone will purify over 3,800,000 gallons of water, and the AquaTabs will purify 2,500,000 gallons of water.

This work is in addition to our current activities targeting the cholera impact area, including providing treatment systems and Gadyen Dlo to 353 schools with UNICEF, delivering 90 gallons of Gadyen Dlo to DINEPA (Ministry of Water and Sanitation) to purify over 340,000 gallons of water, and training healthcare workers.

Leogane - Gadyen Dlo banner over flooded street
Leogane - Gadyen Dlo banner over flooded street
Leogane - Still smiling and joking
Leogane - Still smiling and joking

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on November 15, 2010

Love A Child helping with Cholera Outbreak

WaterBrick has partnered with Love A Child, a non-profit Christian Humanitarian Organization, that has been helping in Haiti since 1991.  While there relationships will certainly make it easier to pass through the red tape of importing goods, the bigger benefit is that they are a trusted Haiti distribution source to get our donated goods to those in need.  To learn more about the wonderful work that this organization does everyday, go to http://www.loveachild.com/.

In response to the recent cholera outbreak, WaterBrick has donated 1,000 gallons of bleach to Love A Child to distribute to be used as a disinfectant to stop this outbreak.  We are actively contacting corporate donors to increase this donation of bleach through Love A Child and your help would be appreciated through contacts you may have so let us know at info@waterbrick.org.  As of this November 11th report, More than 80 people have died in the last 24 hours across the country, according to the health ministry, taking the death toll to 724.  Hurricane Tomas has magnified the problem in recent days causing this outbreak to reach Port-Au-Prince putting at risk the millions living in tent cities.  For more information on this story, go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-11736833.  Dirty drinking containers reused out of the garbage dumps is one cause for the spread of cholera and is why it is so important for us to continue providing clean drinking containers.  Dr. Claude Surena, the head of the Haiti Medical Association, told us personally when we were in Haiti that they would need at minimum 250,000 containers.

For pictures of our work in Haiti from your donations, go to http://waterbrickpictures.shutterfly.com/pictures/119.  We will add more pictures at this link to show our recent donations currently being distributed in our next update.  We appreciate your continued support from either yourself, your friends or your family by going to http://www.globalgiving.org/4578.  If you have any questions, you can contact as directly at info@waterbrick.org.

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By David McGinty on October 26, 2010

Cholera Outbreak - Safe water solution

 

Deep Springs International is currently under the pressure of the recent cholera outbreak in Haiti that has already killed over 200 Haitians and sickened over 2,000.  Cholera is a preventable illness, preventable with our liquid chlorine.  

The areas affected include the Artibonite Valley (a location of many persons displaced by the earthquake), Arcahaie (near Port-au-Prince), and Limbey.  This outbreak has also increased worries the disease could reach the earthquake zone.  According to the Pan American Health Organization, the number of cases will continue to grow because Haitians do not have any built-up immunity to cholera.  

 

This weekend Deep Springs International delivered 80 gallons of Gadyen Dlo  (our Haitian made liquid chlorine treatment) to DINEPA (Haiti’s health ministry) to purify over 1,200,000 million liters of water.  DINEPA will use this shipment of Gadyen Dlo in St. Marc to treat a piped public water system.

We are working on providing more safe water treatments through DINEPA, working with our partner NGOs to coordinate the distribution of a large in-kind donation of chlorine tablets that can purify 2,000 gallons of water at a time, and ensuring our 33,000 beneficiaries (including over 18,000 in Leogane) are fully supplied with clean water.

 

You can help Haitians by guaranteeing the safe water necessary to shield families from infection and rejuvenate those who are already sick.

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Felicia Montgomery on October 26, 2010

Vital Response to Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

Public information and effective community outreach identified by World Health Organization (WHO) as the single most effective way of tackling cholera

In close coordination with the Government of Haiti, local media partners, the United Nations, international and local relief organizations, and health and civilian protection officials, Internews is helping to coordinate and disseminate a large-scale emergency public information campaign vital to the containment, prevention and early treatment of cholera as the World Health Organization (WHO) states "that a public information campaign can make the difference between life and death" in Haiti.

The government and the humanitarian community are responding to a cholera outbreak that is blamed for more than 250 deaths and over 3,000 confirmed cases to date, putting in place measures to prevent the disease spreading further from outlying St Marc, Artibonite, the epicenter of the outbreak, to the Port au Prince region and other affected areas by the January 12th earthquake.

Under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and the Department of Civil Protection (DPC), Internews is assisting Communicating with Disaster Affected Communities (CDAC) Haiti, a communications coordination platform, to rapidly roll out a comprehensive public information campaign using radio, television, megaphones, sound trucks and community-based mobilization, to communicate messages about cholera and cholera diagnosis, prevention and treatment. In addition, Internews is helping to broadcast an SMS message campaign from the Ministry of Health encouraging Haitians to text "Maladi" to 4636 to receive health information via SMS message on cholera, free of charge.

Internews is producing special radio shows of its own ENDK, News you Can Use program that reaches up to 70% of the Haitian population in partnership with over 35 local radio stations. These radio shows carry information on cholera, symptoms, prevention messages, the evolving situation, and responses by the Haitian Government and its humanitarian partners. These two ENKD programs have already been broadcast across Port au Prince and have been rushed to St-Marc to air in Artibonite on local radio stations.

Communications coordination is key

From Port au Prince and St Marc, CDAC is focusing on facilitating information sharing with local media, community outreach, and ensuring collaboration and support from all responders involved to the national communication strategy through the Ministry of Communication. CDAC Haiti is mapping the existing communications initiatives and capacity, identifying gaps and needs such as megaphones, speakers, radios and community mobilizers, as well as gathering approved messages on cholera treatment and prevention from the government.

CDAC, led by Internews in Haiti, is sharing all this information with the government, humanitarian organizations and local media in the affected areas and Port au Prince to ensure that messages transmitted are consistent, easy to understand, widely disseminated and approved by the relevant authorities.

“We know from past experience that unless someone is there to facilitate and coordinate communication, we will see inconsistent, confusing and possibly contradictory information going out,” says Imogen Wall, UN Humanitarian Spokesperson for Haiti. “All this is particularly important in this context as Haitians are not familiar with cholera and in environments like this misinformation and rumors take root very fast. In cholera epidemics, 80% of cholera patients’ lives can be saved through information: people need to know how to prevent transmission and identify and treat early symptoms especially if they are in remote areas where they cannot receive medical help.”

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on October 25, 2010

Emergency: Alarming Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

A cholera outbreak has struck Central Haiti, causing more than 130 deaths and sickening at least 1,500 others. International Medical Corps teams here in Haiti have already responded with medical supplies to the cholera-affected areas, and are pre-positioning supplies in other areas in the event the outbreak spreads. As the only member of the UN emergency response team, International Medical Corps is ready to deploy a full Emergency Response team with doctors and nurses to the area within 24 hours, if needed.

“International Medical Corps is extremely concerned at the speed in which this outbreak spread,” says Dr. Jojo Cangao, International Medical Corps' medical director in Haiti. “We have already begun community outreach and prepositioning of supplies in the camps in which we work in Port-au-Prince in case the outbreak moves south.” More than one million people have been living in displacement camps since the January 12 earthquake, which killed more than 300,000.

There are already reports of the outbreak moving south, closer to Port-au-Prince, and International Medical Corps is pre-positioning supplies for orphanages in this area. Supplies, such as IV saline solution, water purification tablets, and oral rehydration salts, are being collected to dispatch to Artibonite if needed and to preposition in camps where International Medical Corps runs clinics. International Medical Corps is also coordinating with partners in camps where it has clinics to begin community education campaigns on cholera prevention, identification, and treatment - and clinic staff are being trained in cholera treatment and management.

“We are prepared to support the emergency response to the cholera outbreak however is most needed, whether through medical personnel, supplies, or both,” says Dr. Cangao.

International Medical Corps has extensive experience in cholera outbreak response, management, and prevention, with its most recent responses in Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and Iraq. Clean water, sanitation, and hygiene are also one of its top organizational priorities, with such programs in countries including Haiti, Somalia, Kenya, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Thank you so much for your continuing support -- we are able to respond to emergencies like this because of your wonderful generosity. 

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on October 22, 2010

PIH responds to cholera outbreak in Haiti

A cholera epidemic has broken out in the Lower Artibonite region of Haiti. As of Friday morning, October 22, more than 2,000 cases and 140 deaths had been reported. PIH has rushed clinical reinforcements and supplies to the region and has mounted a massive community education and mobilization campaign. Community health workers are fanning out throughout the area to distribute oral rehydration salts and soap and to warn people of the need to drink only clean or purified water and wash their hands frequently—the two keys to preventing further spread of the disease.

Starting on Tuesday evening, patients suffering from acute watery diarrhea began arriving at Hôpital Saint Nicolas in St. Marc, which PIH operates in partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Health. By Thursday evening the hospital in St. Marc was overflowing with over 500 patients, of whom 12 had died. Another 437 patients were taken in between 6:00 Thursday evening and 5:00 Friday morning. Other hospitals in the Lower Artibonite region—including PIH facilities in Petite Riviere and Verettes—also reported large numbers of patients with similar symptoms and high mortality rates.

Although the diagnosis of cholera was not confirmed until Friday morning, PIH, the Ministry of Health, and other partner organizations had already launched urgent treatment and prevention efforts. The most effective treatment for both cholera and other acute diarrheal diseases is oral rehydration; and prevention hinges on providing access to clean water.

Zanmi Lasante dispatched reinforcements for both the clinical and community outreach efforts from our team in Port au Prince and our facilities in the Central Plateau. And several longstanding partner organizations have rallied to support PIH and the Ministry of Health on both fronts. Operation Blessing, which has worked closely with PIH to provide clean water in settlements around Port-au-Prince, rushed to St. Marc to help. Two branches of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF-Spain and MSF-Belgium) deployed clinical team reinforcements to St. Marc and Petite Riviere, where they are taking the lead in setting up systems to separate cholera cases from non-cholera cases.

Lack of access to clean water has long been a major threat to public health throughout Haiti. Zanmi Lasante has worked with partner organizations to combat the problem on many fronts:

  • at the household level—by building and supplying filtration systems to households in isolated areas;
  • at the community level—by constructing spring caps and piping water to kiosks for use by local residents; and
  • at the national and international level—by advocating for changes of policy and commitment of resources to make clean water available to all as a fundamental human right. In a study published in 2007, PIH documented the damage to public health caused by a 10-year delay in disbursing loans that had already been approved for construction of water improvement projects in several Haitian communities, including St. Marc. Learn more.

As we work urgently to treat cholera patients and halt the epidemic before it can spread to the crowded settlements around Port au Prince, PIH will continue to emphasize that strengthening public infrastructure, especially the water supply, must be a top priority in post-earthquake reconstruction efforts.

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Train Haitians to Help Rebuild their Country

By Suzanne Craig on October 25, 2010

1,000+ Relief Workers Trained through Your Support

Over the course of our programme, and through the generous support of our donors, we have trained over 1,000 relief workers across key humanitarian areas such as water, sanitation and hygiene, shelter, supply chain and fleet management, safety and security, and telecommunications. 91 percent of the people trained have been national Haitian humanitarian personnel, providing a strong skills base within the country, increasing local involvement in the relief and recovery process and ensuring that skills remain in country long after the media attention has faded.

We are now winding down our training operations in Haiti.  RedR would like to sincerely thank everyone who contributed to our Emergency Appeal; your donations have made an invaluable difference to rebuilding the lives and livelihoods of the people of Haiti. 

There will remain a strong legacy of our time in Haiti. The skills taught will continue to have impact on the ongoing relief operation for months, even years to come. RedR Members will continue to work in the region, sharing their experience and  our technical support service remains available to all field workers. 

For a our full Haiti report and for further information about RedR's activities please visit our website: www.redr.org.uk

Thank you for what you have helped us do for the Haitian community.

 

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Patti Mangan on October 17, 2010

Our commiment to providing lifesaving supplies

In the immediate aftermath of the devastating earthquake in Haiti, VIDA quickly responded by airlifting two containers carrying $2.0 million in medical emergency relief into Haiti's triage supply chain. This was made possible by the generous support of Global Giving members. VIDA is now focusing on rebuilding the long-term healthcare delivery systems in Haiti's remote communities.

 VIDA is in the planning phase with our Haiti and USA partners for a three year program to annually ship twelve containers of medical supplies and equipment to hospitals in Petit-Goave, Paillant and Miragoane. These hospitals were decimated in the quake and serve hundreds of thousands of Haiti's poorest citizens. VIDA has chosen these three hospitals because they are operating in regions underserved by relief efforts. The need for healthcare is becoming even more acute as temporary clinics are being dismantled as emergency aid organizations are winding down operations. The situation in Haiti is growing increasingly dire as we move into the rebuilding phase.

This effort has requires extensive planning due to the infrastructure challenges facing Haiti as well as the increasing customs regulations with importing medical aid into the country as the nation now is in the rebuilding phase. Roads, buildings, medical supplies, medical equipment and trained medical personnel are inadequate but are critical in carrying out a sustainable program. This reality requires that VIDA and its partners undertake extensive planning and due diligence to ensure the program's success. Upon completing the panning phase, VIDA will be sending only the highest quality medical equipment and supplies, from bandages to surgical suites, to get the hospitals up and running and will then resupply the hospital over a three year period to ensure that the clinics have the resources to serve people in need.

A small sample of medical equipment includes: Hospital beds & gurneys; Stretchers; Cots, Dental or ophthalmology chairs; Disabled and elderly equipment: wheelchairs, walkers (foldable), crutches and canes; Exam & physical therapy tables; Operating tables; Small/portable: pulse oxymeters, defibrillators, incubators, endoscopy, ultrasound, anesthesia, ECG & dialysis machines, etc.

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By David B. McGinty on October 07, 2010

How you are helping serve over 150,000 Haitians

DSI Staff in Leogane, Haiti
DSI Staff in Leogane, Haiti

As of August 2010, DSI and you are now serving over 150,000 Haitians with safe water for years to come.  Through your help and that of organizations like Save the Children and UNICEF we have been able to act quickly--providing not only safe water for a day but safe water for a lifetime through a strategic plan that converts traditional aid into sustainable jobs and enterprises.

Our programs reach both communities with the same safe water system - Gadyen Dlo - that you helped provided to over 60,000 Haitians in the earthquake zone.  This was not a "one time hit," like a vaccination.  Your compassion has helped us distribute and establish a system that will transition from initial aid to Haitian-managed sustainable enterprises.  As we talk about it internally, we provide a solution to a systemic problem that is "for Haitians, by Haitians."

Although we have been able to create many jobs for Haitians and provide safe water to over 150,000 Haitians, the need is increasing for rural Haitians.  Traditional aid organizations and the Haitian government are now focusing time and resources on dense population centers to the neglect of the rural communities that DSI serves.  There are over 1,200,000 rural Haitians who still do not have safe water to drink or properly prepare meals.   

The impact from the January 2010 earthquake remains, and we would love to continue serving rural Haitians with you.

If you have any questions, let us know!  Please also check out our website with many updates and more complete information about our strategy, goals, and people - www.deepspringsinternational.org 

Jean Alliance (Program Coordinator) at UN Leogane
Jean Alliance (Program Coordinator) at UN Leogane
A few children we serve in Leogane
A few children we serve in Leogane

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Dr. Jojo Cangao on September 23, 2010

Letter from Dr. Jojo Cangao, Medical Director in Haiti

It’s hard to believe that it’s only been five months since I became International Medical Corps’ Medical Director in Haiti. Looking back, I am really proud of the number of people we reached and the level of medical care we provided - especially when so many were at their most vulnerable to diseases like malaria, dengue and typhoid fever. To date, there has been no outbreak of disease in Haiti following the earthquake, even with 1.5 million people displaced. Through our 13 mobile clinics throughout the quake-affected regions, International Medical Corps was able to quickly deliver health care services, critical medicines and protect those who lost everything.

We not only successfully cared for people’s physical wounds, but their emotional wounds as well by making mental health care services available to quake-affected Haitians. Mental health care scarcely existed in Haiti before the earthquake and now, because of the training we have provided, our doctors and nurses are able to identify, handle, and if necessary, refer mental health cases for advanced care. In fact, some of our doctors are now going to be certified by the Ministry of Health as providers of mental health care!

Although we’ve made a lot of progress in Haiti, we definitely have some challenges coming our way, namely with the current hurricane season, which could cause larger displacement and even more health problems for an already vulnerable population. Flooding always poses a threat to health, as waterborne diseases become more prominent. With this risk, we have been prioritizing disease surveillance in the areas where we work and contributing to a national system so that outbreaks are tracked and responded to effectively. As our primary health clinics are a vital prevention mechanism, as well as a platform to track outbreaks of diseases, we’ve been working with the government, other international NGOs, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on a disease surveillance system through our primary health clinics.

In addition, we are also rolling out our disaster response and preparedness program in Petit Goave and Jacmel, two disaster-prone areas in southern Haiti. Through this program we will train Ministry of Health staff and local communities in emergency preparedness and response, including first-responder training for health professionals. Our biggest challenge will be making sure that we are building an effective health care system that improves upon what t existed previously in Haiti. Even before the earthquake, only 47% of Haitians had access to health care. Seeing the progress made so far though, I believe we can create a health care system that serves all Haitians and I’m excited to be part of the rebuilding process.

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Felicia Montgomery on September 09, 2010

Thank you for Supporting Sustainable Haitian Media

To date, Internews has produced and distributed more than 150 Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen (ENDK) shows. The show – “News You Can Use” in English – covers information of critical importance to those affected by the Haiti earthquake.ENDK is recorded daily, and delivered by motorbike in Port-au-Prince to local radio stations that air the broadcast. Initially nine radio stations were broadcasting daily. Today, that number has reached 33. Recent issues covered to inform camp residents and others include:

• Elections: Where to vote, register and file disputes • Disaster preparedness: A US medical boat stands ready to help the Haitian population in case of hurricane disaster. • Entertainment: Announcement of free outdoor movie screenings in Pétion-Ville

On June 1st Internews launched www.enkd.info, with French summaries and Creole transcripts of ENDK broadcasts. The site also allows any radio station to download audio content and customize it for broadcast. The site features Weekly Mailbox, a choice of the most relevant Q&A addressed during the week. More than 400 Weekly Mailbox questions have been answered so far on topics that vary from “How to get a death certificate for a person whose body was never found” to “Is shooting into to the sky to celebrate after a soccer match allowed?”

This information is vital to Haitians as they continue to recover from the devastating earthquake. The radio is the most popular form of consuming information. A recent GlobalPost article details the importance of Haitian journalists and their reporting to the country’s recovery: “Broadcasting from tents outside crumbled stations, Haiti’s radio journalists are striking a stronger, more critical tone, holding local and foreign officials accountable for missteps as the country limps toward recovery.”

Thank you for your support of humanitarian news and information in Haiti.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Michael Vanasse on September 01, 2010

Taking Education Forward in Haiti

"Ecole Eddy Pascal Takes Education Forward"

Ecole Eddy Pascal was a cornerstone of the local community in Carrefour, Haiti, for over 25 years. Housed in an imposing three-story building, Ecole Eddy Pascal offered elementary and secondary school, classes for adults and a cultural club for the community. But the facility collapsed on January 12, and the school director, Eddy Pascal himself, began searching for a way to start over.

"The first thing we did was ask parents what they had and what they could contribute," he said. "But then Save the Children arrived and gave us exactly what we needed."

Soon there were tents for classrooms, blackboards, equipment and supplies. Children received school kits including a backpack, notebooks and writing utensils. Save the Children has also been training the teachers on how to help children cope with the emotional stress children have suffered from the earthquake. In addition, teachers are coached on how to handle aftershocks that might occur during school hours, making them better prepared to respond in an emergency situation.

"I'm very happy for the opportunity to participate in the trainings," says teacher Jean-Joab. "Psychologically we are much more prepared now."

Jean-Joab hopes the children will be able to move forward despite the suffering they have experienced and the challenges they continue to face. He continues, "I want the children to be able to live their lives with the tools they gain here so that education is practical for their lives. I am much more patient now. We have just come out of a nightmare."

"Making a Home for the School: Cash-for-Work and Education Working Together"

When the January 12 earthquake completely destroyed the Ecole Mixte Etzer Vilaire des Orangers in Jacmel, Haiti, School Director Joseph Constant was devastated. The remnants of the foundation are the only evidence the school ever even existed. Fortunately school had ended by the time the earthquake hit, and no one was hurt. "I thought there was no way school could continue," Mr. Constant explains, "but I knew we had to find a way to prevent the children from slipping in their studies. So now we have a friendship with Save the Children."

In addition to clearing an area for a temporary school through a cash-for-work program, Save the Children provided tents, benches, blackboards, and a school kit for children including a backpack, writing utensils and a workbook. Local community members who were engaged in the cash-for-work program also set up the tents and cleared the rubble from the former school location. They are now working to prepare the new school site.

Participants in the cash-for-work program are local community members who were affected by the earthquake, some of whom had lost their home or their livelihood in the disaster. The program also specifically supports people with three or more children and women who are heads of household.

The students are thrilled to be back in classes. "School is important because we need to learn," exclaims the first grade class almost in unison. "It's important to know how to write so that we can spell our names," adds 7-year-old Woudline. Each student in the first grade class has a goal: they want to "work the land" or "build houses" or "be a nurse."

Twelve-year-old Monise states in a serious tone, "After school I'm going to work so that I can help my mother." The school had 127 students prior to the earthquake. To date, 92 students have returned. Many others have left the area as families migrated to other regions or children who had been in the care of a relative returned to parents' homes. Mr. Constant is hopeful that school attendance will continue to grow as they move into their new, permanent location. "Education is the key to freedom," Mr. Constant declares. "Both the school and Save the Children know it is our duty to educate children. To work in education is a matter of the heart."

Save the Children has been working in Haiti since 1978 and had numerous education projects in place prior to the earthquake. Since January 12, education programming has expanded to include over 270 schools that are now benefitting from tents, tarpaulins, equipment, supplies, school kits and/or teacher training. Save the Children plans to provide access to school for more than 160,000 children in Haiti.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Britt Lake on August 27, 2010

Your donation is having an impact in Haiti!

CHF is providing shelter to displaced families.
CHF is providing shelter to displaced families.

More than seven months after Haiti’s devastating earthquake, rubble still fills the streets and 1 million people or more people are still homeless. GlobalGiving donors like you have supported close to 20 organizations working on the ground to provide food, shelter, medical equipment, and long-term reconstruction for Haiti’s earthquake survivors. Below is a short update the organizations your dollars have helped to support and the impact that have already had. Thank you!

- The Lambi Fund of Haiti has provided emergency cash disbursements to 43 grassroots organization throughout Haiti. These local organizations have used the emergency grants to purchase clothes, food, medical supplies and other necessary supplies for earthquake survivors.

- VIDA has already airlifted two containers carrying $2 million in medical emergency relief into Haiti. VIDA is sending only the highest quality medical equipment and supplies, from bandages to surgical suites, to get the hospitals up and running and will then resupply the hospital over a three year period to ensure that the clinics have the resources to serve people in need.

- RedR has trained 871 relief workers from 46 organizations in essential humanitarian and reconstruction skills and techniques - 92% of those trained are Haitian nationals

- Partners in Health’s local staff of nearly 5,000 people have provided emergency critical care and surgical services; helped seriously injured patients regain mobility; resettled abandoned and disabled children into a safe group home; and provided strategic planning assistance to Port-au-Prince’s General Hospital and the Haitian Ministry of Health.

- CHF has registered more than 2,200 shelter beneficiaries and is currently in the process of completing 600 shelters in Port-au-Prince and Leogane. Over 60 shelters have been constructed in Leogane as part of a pilot project using steel materials that are pre-fabricated by trained workers at the local CHF warehouse.

Thank you again for your support!

Lambi Fund gives necessary emergency funds.
Lambi Fund gives necessary emergency funds.
RedR carries out trainings for disaster workers.
RedR carries out trainings for disaster workers.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on August 25, 2010

Moving from Relief to Rebuilding

Local grassroots org distributing funds to members
Local grassroots org distributing funds to members

It’s been seven months since January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti. Thanks to the outpouring of support from donors like you, Lambi Fund has provided emergency cash disbursements to 43 grassroots organizations throughout Haiti.

Rural parts of Haiti received over ½ a million internally displaced persons (IDPs) following the earthquake. These local organizations have used the emergency grants to purchase clothes, food, medical supplies and other life essentials for earthquake survivors.

Ostazia Ogusten and her husband have 10 children and live in Mahotiere in North West, Haiti. She states that, “After the quake our household doubled. It was extremely problematic. We didn’t have the means to care for them. It’s thanks to Lambi Fund that we got the relief we so desperately needed. We could supply food, water, and medical supplies to earthquake survivors.”

Providing emergency relief to earthquake survivors was just the beginning. These individuals need to develop forms of sustainable incomes and integrate into their new communities. Your continued support will help survivors launch small business enterprises and plant crops for their families- providing hope for today and tomorrow.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By David Humphries on August 26, 2010

Fishermen, Markets and a Good Place to Hang Out

I recently visited a St Marc fishermen’s association in the downtown area. St Marc is on the Caribbean sea and fishing is a major industry. But traditionally, fishermen would go out, catch some fish then come back and try and find a good place to sell them. It might be the side of the street somewhere, it might be near the sea, or maybe in the center of town. But too often their wares were spoiled by the heat or simply went unsold because of the unsettled location – consumers need to know where to come to buy. Additionally, they would have to travel for hours to get to Port au Prince to buy fishing materials and as lone buyers, never got a good deal.

The C in CHF stands for “Cooperative” and we always aim to get people to cooperate for greater benefit. We brought together many individual fishermen in the community and encouraged them to form an association. We then worked with that association to build a central market place where they can sort and prepare their catch, then sell it. In the office of the building we put in place several solar powered freezers so that unsold fish can be kept for the next day. With the building being a market place, there is now a centralized location for sales and, because of the footfall in the building, local businesses pay to advertise on their walls. Additionally we provided them with materials for wooden fishing boats, built by a local boat builder, new net technology, and a local partner provided them with a fiberglass boat in case of emergencies that can reach distressed fishermen. Finally, there are the other benefits of an association – increased purchasing power drives down prices and they can buy in bulk. A part of their – massively increased - profits goes towards running the association, the rest goes into their pockets.

When we visited it was the middle of the afternoon. The fish had been sold (the freezers were pleasingly empty) and the market place had become a place of social gathering for fathers, mothers and children, both of the human and animal variety. Ducklings, goat kids and piglets ran around on the beach alongside children who shouted to me in Spanish (presumably the language they hear most from foreigners) and posed for photographs. My eyes went to the trash washing up on the beach and I began to think about how we could install a solid waste management system, but that was for another day. Our guide, a local CHF staff member, Georges, pointed me in the directions north and south – we have built three of these buildings for the local associations. He was extremely proud of this work – genuinely passionate – and so he should be. He and all the staff in St Marc – all Haitian - had worked with his community to put in place changes along the whole market chain from improvements in catching fish to storing and selling them. And, motivated by their improved profits and lifestyle, I am certain the associations will remain in place in the future and, I hope, influence others in the area.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on August 16, 2010

Helping Haiti with Longer Term Strategy

WaterBricks stack for water and food storage
WaterBricks stack for water and food storage

WaterBrick’s are already being distributed in Haiti with help from Dow Chemical, the Red Cross, Global Giving and nearly 400 donors like you. Dow Chemical announced their support of WaterBrick in Haiti when they issued a press release on April 8th and their Chairman and CEO, Andrew Liveris, stated, “We are very proud to be working with WaterBrick International to help bring much needed relief to the Haitian people … And because WaterBricks can be repurposed, these materials will generate zero waste, which is in line with our sustainability commitments." For the full press release, go to www.dow.com and site search WaterBrick. To date, Dow Chemical has donated 610,000 pounds of plastic resin to be used for WaterBrick containers to help Haiti relief efforts.

How is the WaterBrick container helping in Haiti? Made of rugged, high density polyethylene with an easy grip comfort handle, it can hold 3.5 Gallons of Liquid or up to 27 Pounds (264 Meals) of Dry Food. These unique dry storage containers, unlike any other, add value by cross stacking up to 7 feet for maximum efficient storage or can be used as a building block for transitional basic shelter. It has a wide lid opening that easily allows an average adult to pull stored contents out of the container. It stores water, food or anything you want to keep dry or store efficiently. Also, it has an ultra violet additive so it is non-biodegradable and therefore can be repurposed for 15 years by the people in Haiti; thus having long term benefits. We have included a picture of the WaterBrick stacking so that you can see firsthand how efficiently it can store water and food in Haiti.

Going forward, WaterBrick is committed to a longer term strategy in Haiti based on forming new corporate sponsorships, like with Dow Chemical, working with larger humanitarian agencies and increasing our grass roots donations; all through our relationship with Global Giving.

Our next report will include pictures of WaterBricks being used in Haiti for water and food storage.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on July 26, 2010

Stand With Haiti - Six Month Report

SIX MONTH REPORT OVERVIEW

Six months have now passed since a devastating earthquake ripped through Haiti. Every day since January 12, 2010, Partners In Health (PIH) and our sister organization Zanmi Lasante (ZL) have been working to help Haiti's people build their lives and their country back better.

Although not yet fully funded, the Stand With Haiti Fund we established in March has provided PIH and ZL with the resources and the strategic vision to begin the process of building back better in Haiti through a combination of: strengthened clinical services at our existing health centers and hospitals as well as in new facilities; expanded social and economic support programs for the most vulnerable patients and community members where we work; and investments in long-term, strategic revitalization of the public health and medical education systems.

Over the past 26 weeks, our efforts have saved lives through emergency critical care and surgical services; helped seriously injured patients regain mobility; resettled abandoned and disabled children into a safe group home; comforted communities in need of spiritual and emotional solace; and provided strategic planning assistance to Port-au-Prince's General Hospital (HUEH) as well as the Haitian Ministry of Health (MOH) leadership.

Hundreds of thousands of earthquake survivors across the Central Plateau and Artibonite Valley regions as well as in four large settlements of displaced people in Port-au-Prince have benefitted from the generosity of all those who supported and continue to give to PIH's Stand With Haiti Fund. This report summarizes what you have helped make possible since that terrible afternoon in January. For more detailed information and multimedia content, please visit www.standwithhaiti.org/six-months.

We have been able to respond to the disaster and embark on the work of building back better thanks to the extraordinary generosity and solidarity of individuals, organizations, and institutions who through June 30 had contributed a total of $85 million, including a substantial sum designated specifically for long-term rebuilding and strengthening Haiti's public health system.

Of that amount, we have expended $26.6 million to date. The table below (see link: PIH Six-Month Report: Overview) presents a summary of how that money has been spent and the graph provides a projection of how we intend to use the remaining $98.4 million of our planned $125 million fund over the next two years. These projections are consistent with the general parameters outlined when the Stand with Haiti Fund was established. They have been and will continue to be refined and adjusted regularly based on our understanding of shifting needs and priorities.

Our work is far from over. The rubble has yet to be fully cleared. More than a million people are still living under tents, tarps, and makeshift shelters in crowded encampments, with limited access to food, water, sanitation, schools, jobs, and social services. Many people are still in pain, hungry, and desperate.

But with over 25 years experience and a local staff of nearly 5,000 people working through an expanding network of public hospitals and health centers, we're committed to continuing to provide quality health care to those who need it most and striving to bring long-term strategic improvements to Haiti's public health and medical education systems. To do this, we will use the same values and approach that have guided our work for many years: solidarity with the Haitian people and the communities in which they live; partnership with the government of Haiti and other institutions and organizations; and a comprehensive vision of what is comprised by health care.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Mike Vanasse on July 16, 2010

Haiti Field Update and Video

Life After the Quake

Six months after the quake, despite the significant progress Save the Children and others have made to alleviate children’s suffering and begin addressing longer-term needs, the magnitude of the destruction and damage is such that much remains to be done to assist children and families. Rubble still fills the streets of Port-au-Prince, Léogâne and Jacmel. Most people have little access to safe shelter, drinking water, electricity or health care. Approximately 1 million are still homeless, many living in substandard shelters. Children lost family, friends, schools and homes and are particularly vulnerable to disease, abuse and exploitation. The infrastructure essential to the process of rebuilding — electricity, sanitation, health facilities and schools — was largely destroyed in the quake, hampering efforts to provide services to needy families. Under these precarious conditions, Haiti’s hurricane season has officially begun. Heavy rains could spell another disaster for the country and its people. If, as predicted, Haiti experiences intense storms and hurricanes, already vulnerable children and their families will require a renewed surge of humanitarian aid, especially shelter, food, water and sanitation.

An Opportunity for a New Haiti

Haiti’s people may feel anxious that another hurricane or earthquake could strike at any time, but the prospect of rebuilding and creating a new, better country offers hope. With support from unprecedented numbers of citizens and public and private organizations worldwide, Haitians have an historic opportunity to rebuild a nation that has struggled for centuries with persistent poverty, exclusion and weak governance. Save the Children has an ongoing commitment to Haiti that goes back to its first programs in 1978. Our current goal is to alleviate the suffering of 800,000 people (including 470,000 children) affected by the disaster. The agency also is preparing to assist Haiti through a 5-year relief-to-recovery effort to build back better. Strengthening the capacity of Haitians and their institutions —governmental and nongovernmental alike — will enable Haiti’s people to play a more active role in managing their own future. If further crises arise, Save the Children will renew its emergency assistance. Donor governments need to uphold their commitments and deliver on pledges to provide timely, robust and sustained support during this still critical phase of the emergency in Haiti, and for the recovery and long-term development of its people. Actors in the recovery need to be accountable for the use of aid resources. This will ensure that aid strengthens the institutions governing Haiti’s recovery and development and fosters transparency and participation of all stakeholders, including children.

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Train Haitians to Help Rebuild their Country

By Chris Sidell on July 14, 2010

Haiti earthquake - 6 months on

Sphere training
Sphere training

Since RedR set up its Disaster Response Support Service, 871 relief workers working for 46 organisations have been trained in essential humanitarian and reconstruction skills and techniques. Crucially, 92% of those trained are Haitian nationals - helping communities to respond with the resources they need to rebuild their lives. This philosophy is highlighted in our campaign Respond, Resource, Rebuild. Read more by clicking on the link below.

What effect does RedR's training have? It means participants can leave our training room and help communities fight disease, distribute supplies, get clean water and stay safe. It also means Haitians are gaining skills and knowledge that will stay with them for a lifetime.

It is thanks to people like you that we have been able to run this program. Thank you so much for your support.

Training Islamic Relief
Training Islamic Relief

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Train Haitians to Help Rebuild their Country

By Chris Sidell on June 22, 2010

734 aid workers now trained by DRSS

Magdala Jean Baptiste
Magdala Jean Baptiste

Since we established our Disaster Response Support Service in Haiti, 734 aid workers have now been trained in humanitarian, technical and related disciplines. The vast majority of participants are Haitian nationals, helping the country respond, resource and rebuild.

Magdala Jean Baptiste is a Haitian teacher currently working for Save the Children as an Education Coordinator. Magdala’s team is based in Jacamel – close to the epicentre of the quake - where an estimated 60 percent of buildings and infrastructure were severely damaged or destroyed. Her work involves liaising closely with educational representatives, children and communities on areas such as reopening schools and reinstating classes, safeguarding children and distributing materials.

Magdala has been passing on what she learnt, ensuring that knowledge of good hygiene practice is widely disseminated in camps and local communities: “I’ve replicated what I learnt on the RedR training course to our community mobilisation teams who then in turn have run hygiene education in schools; for the school heads, teachers, students and parental committees. In total we have educated 1,228 people who will each teach 30 people in their community about the importance of good hygiene practices to help prevent disease outbreaks. That will make 36,840 Haitians who have been reached on the basis of this one important training.

Training Haitian aid workers
Training Haitian aid workers
Water, sanitation and hygiene training
Water, sanitation and hygiene training

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Felicia Montgomery on June 14, 2010

Haitians in Tent Cities Get Humanitarian Info

Man receives handcrack radio (Winnie Romeril)
Man receives handcrack radio (Winnie Romeril)

By supporting Internews’ efforts in Haiti, you can directly make possible the broadcast of vital information in a country that largely depends on radio for its news and information. Help us continue to serve the needs of earthquake victims in Haiti and contribute to the long-term recovery of Haiti’s media sector.

Haitians are still struggling with devastating after effects of the January 12 earthquake. Almost two million people are living in displaced person camps, in which problems of garbage disposal, health, security and violence are compounded.

Providing Haitians with reliable information is critical to their continuing struggle to obtain employment, education for their children, permanent housing and access to health services.

Since a few days after the earthquake, with a team of local reporters, Internews has been producing a daily 15-minute news program – Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen (News You Can Use) – that is currently airing on 25 local radio stations.

A survey found that 82% of men and 67% of women listen to Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen as an information source. “If you go to Haiti, everyone, just everything they say is, 'News You Can Use said that. News You Can Use said that,'” said Caitlin Klevorick, Special Assistant to Counselor Cheryl Mills, US State Department, at a panel discussion on the role of media in the response to the earthquake. Almost one million Haitians listen to and depend on Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen for humanitarian news and information.

The program reports critical information about water distribution points, openings of displaced persons camps, the role of search and rescue teams, public health advisories, education, culture and more. The program invites direct feedback from the affected population in the form of SMS text messages and emails, keeping the broadcast current. Radio, along with church, is one of the most trusted sources of information in Haiti and people overwhelmingly prefer local stations.

The continuation of humanitarian broadcasting as well as building and sustaining a strong local media is critical to Haiti’s reconstruction and political and economic development.

What donors are saying:

“(I give because of) the unsurpassed work Internews does in emergency situations in restoring access to information and news, which does "save lives" – Sarah Tisch, DC

“(I give because I) believe that the power of communication is imperative in a humanitarian disaster of this sort” – Katie Well, London

Thank you for your support. Together, we can make a difference.

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Callie Spaide on June 13, 2010

Double Your Impact

Because of your generosity after the earthquake in Haiti, we were able to rapidly mobilize and provide life-saving care to tens of thousands, and we thank you for your support. But the people of Haiti still need our help. On June 16th, Global Giving has pledged to match all contributions up to $1,000 per donor per project between 12:00am and 11:59pm. Only online donations made via credit card or PayPal are eligible and donations made on www.globalgiving.co.uk will not be considered eligible.

This is a wonderful opportunity to double the impact of your support for Haiti’s recovery.

Below are just a few examples of the work we are doing in Haiti right now:

• Since arriving 22 hours after the earthquake, we have provided medical care to more than 79,000 Haitians.

• We are operating 15 mobile clinics in the most underserved regions along the coast, treating approximately 1,500 patients daily.

• We’ve created the first Emergency Department at a public hospital in Haiti.

• Our childhood nutrition program provides supplementary nutrition and care for malnourished children.

• We’ve implemented an early childhood development program in our mobile clinics to mentor new mothers affected by the earthquake about infant stimulation and proper nutrition.

With the help of our supporters, we’ve made impressive strides over the past few months – but there is still so much to be done. As we work to rebuild Haiti and restore hope to those devastated by this disaster, we look forward to your continued commitment.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on June 10, 2010

President Bill Clinton Visits CHF Projects in Haiti

President Clinton and Haitian Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive met with CHF International in Leogane, Haiti yesterday afternoon for a brief visit to a cluster of four steel-framed, transitional shelters constructed by CHF in response to the January 2010 earthquake. Accompanied by Paul Farmer (anthropologist, physician and founder of the NGO, Partners in Health), and with various stakeholders and philanthropists, President Clinton spent 40 minutes meeting with family members living in the shelters and speaking to Eddie Argenal - CHF Emergency Shelter and Infrastructure Officer - and with local members of the shelter construction team.

During his visit, Clinton announced an additional pledge of $2 million towards disaster preparedness in Haiti and for funding of the Interim Haiti Reconstruction Committee.

To date, CHF has registered more than 2,200 shelter beneficiaries in Port-au-Prince and throughout the Petit-Goave-Leogane corridor. CHF is one of the leading organizations in construction of transitional shelters, and is currently in the process of completing 600 shelters in Port-au-Prince and Leogane. Over 60 shelters have been constructed in Leogane as part of a pilot project using steel materials that are pre-fabricated by trained workers at the local CHF warehouse. As part of the USAID/CLEARS program, CHF shelter construction, rubble removal using both heavy machinery and cash-for-work teams and assistance to host families and IDPs in Cap Haitien, will be ongoing through October 2010.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Patti Mangan on June 10, 2010

VIDA makes a 3 year commitment to Haiti Hospitals

In the immediate aftermath of the devastating earthquake in Haiti, VIDA quickly responded by airlifting two containers carrying $2.0 million in medical emergency relief into Haiti's triage supply chain. This was made possible by the generous support of Global Giving members.

In collaboration with Haiti's Ambassador to United States, Raymond Alcide Joseph, and medical doctors based in Florida, VIDA is making a three year commitment to ship twelve containers of medical supplies and equipment to hospitals in Petit-Goave, Paillant and Miragoane. These hospitals were decimated in the quake and serve hundreds of thousands of Haiti's poorest citizens.

VIDA has chosen these three hospitals because they are operating in regions overlooked by relief efforts. VIDA focuses our mission on communities that have been forgotten. VIDA is seeking to raise $100,000 to ship $15 million in aid to give life to these communities in need. As soon this project is funded at 50K we will post a new project for the shipping support needed.

VIDA will be sending only the highest quality medical equipment and supplies, from bandages to surgical suites, to get the hospitals up and running and will then resupply the hospital over a three year period to ensure that the clinics have the resources to serve people in need.

A small sample of medical supplies includes: Bandages; Gauze; Blood pressure equipment; First aid kits; Gloves; Hospital or surgical masks; Orthopedic supplies (braces, prosthetics); Skin treatments, including anti-fungal or antibacterial crèmes; Soap; Disinfectants; Stethoscopes, Surgical supplies (including sutures); Syringes & needles, Tongue depressors , Iodine, and Thermometers.

A small sample of medical equipment includes: Hospital beds & gurneys; Stretchers; Cots, Dental or ophthalmology chairs; Disabled and elderly equipment: wheelchairs, walkers (foldable), crutches and canes; Exam & physical therapy tables; Operating tables; Small/portable: pulse oxymeters, defibrillators, incubators, endoscopy, ultrasound, anesthesia, ECG & dialysis machines, etc.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on June 14, 2010

Haiti- 6 month progress report

Summary: Over the past four months, since the devastating 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti on January 12, 2010, Save the Children has worked nonstop to alleviate children’s suffering and ensure their well-being. Through your generosity and that of other donors, Save the Children has delivered lifesaving relief and today is also transitioning to longer-term recovery programs in the worst-affected communities. We continue to coordinate our responses with government partners, other local and international non-governmental organizations through the United Nations cluster system, and are working with local authorities and communities to address the most urgent needs of children and support their protection and recovery.

To date, over 550,000 children and adults who care for them have benefited from our work in Port-au-Prince, Léogâne, Jacmel and Petit Goave and surrounding communities.

*Please see attached document for full report


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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Sarah Leavitt on May 26, 2010

Life in Haiti- 4 Months Later

Women
Women's Organization Discussing Rebuilding Plans

Thanks to your immediate support, the Lambi Fund of Haiti has been able to provide relief on a level that never before would have been possible. Please read the article below from Lambi Fund's Spring 2010 Newsletter. Hopefully it will provide you with a glimpse of life post-quake in Haiti. It also discusses Lambi Fund's progress made so far and our plans for the future.

PROGRESS AMID THE CHAOS:Lambi Fund Responds to the Earthquake Disaster in Haiti

The world watched in horror as the toll on human life unfolded. Never before, declared UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, has a natural disaster been so devastating.

The Presidential Palace crumbled, UN headquarters were destroyed, building after building collapsed like pancakes.

Unbelievably, 250,000 residences were destroyed or rendered uninhabitable.

The horrible stench of death lurked in the city for weeks afterwards. Over 200,000 people were killed. More than 150,000 individuals injured and left to live life as amputees. In the blink of an eye, nearly 2 million Haitians were rendered homeless.

Responding to such a catastrophe has not been easy. Through the rubble, roads were impossible to navigate and trying to coordinate the influx of international donor agencies was declared a logistical nightmare.

Earthquake survivors left with no homes, no food, and no jobs quickly realized that aid distribution would be slow and unreliable.

Thus over 500,000 affected residents caught the first bus they could find to live with family members and friends in the rural provinces of Haiti.

This massive migration of internally displaced persons has wreaked havoc on already impoverished rural communities, where the average person still survives on less than $2 a day. Some rural populations (so much as) doubled overnight.

Keeping with the Haitian tradition of peasant solidarity, rural communities have been quick to take in quake survivors and have shared with them everything they have. The 80-year-old mother of the field monitor for Fon Lanbi Pou Ayiti has taken in 39 people in her small house.

Christianne Adrien, a street vendor, and her husband Ilson, a farmer, took in 18 members of her extended family. "If it were for the money, we would never have done it."

After the earthquake, more than a half million people fled Port au Prince and relocated to rural areas. They, along with thousands of peasants throughout Haiti have spent what little they have on clean water, medical supplies, clothing, bags of rice, and cans of beans for their new neighbors. Peasants have slaughtered precious cows to bring meat to patients at local hospitals.

Christianne continues, "We did this because we wanted them to have a life. If God saved the life of some people from a catastrophe of that size, it's so that we can protect the life of others. People have to live; you have to receive them."

It is here, through fellow Haitians and local grassroots networks that earthquake survivors are receiving the aid that they so desperately need. Resources are tight, but the spirit of sharing stays strong.

Clearly, the earthquake has touched each and every Lambi Fund of Haiti staff member who along with their fellow citizens sustained damages and suffered personal losses. In spite of these hardships, Lambi Fund staff members sprang into action to help address the urgent needs of 43 rural communities impacted greatly by the massive exodus out of the capital.

In collaboration with our grassroots partners, Lambi Fund convened regional assemblies of local peasants to define immediate needs and prioritize rebuilding efforts.

In the first phase, Lambi Fund focused on the delivery of food and other essentials to rural communities to meet the immediate needs of earthquake survivors who had resettled to these communities.

With the help of regional committees and other partners, the Lambi Fund was able to distribute the following:

Done (wired $712k)

-Grants to 22 grassroots groups in Artibonite, which has received over 162,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) from Port au Prince - to buy clothes, food, meds, and other essentials and infuse the local economy - Cash disbursements to cover losses of Fon Lanbi Pou Ayiti staff members in Port au Prince - Grants to two grassroots women's groups in Port au Prince who lost everything in the quake - to buy clothes, food, meds, and other essentials and infuse the local economy - Grants to four grassroots groups in the Northwest, which has received over 45,000 IDPs - to buy clothes, food, meds, and other essentials and infuse the local economy - Grants to 17 grassroots groups in the South, which has received over 25,000 IDPs - to buy clothes, food, meds, and other essentials and infuse the local economy - Distributed medications (value $8K, donated by UUSC) to hospital in Gwomon - Distributed tents and basic supplies to 17 grassroots groups in South (donated by Hope for Haiti) - Grants to 42 peasant organizations for Farmers Credit Funds so that 1,260 farmers in the Artibonite, South, West and Northwest departments can plant increased crops to feed themselves and IDPs with locally grown food.

Next steps in rebuilding Haiti include focusing on sustaining and strengthening development in rural areas including:

Mid and long term ($1M)

- Increase micro-enterprises with additional community microcredit funds - Increase organic, locally-grown food and clean water with expanded sustainable agriculture, reforestation and water access projects - Increase livelihoods with expanded sustainable development projects, such as pig and goat breeding, grain mills and sugar cane mills - Build 880 latrines to prevent spread of disease and increase sanitation in rural areas, as a result of rapidly growing population from IDPs - Distribute 100 wheelchairs to the large number of amputees whose limbs were crushed in the earthquake. - Expand women's programs to address the special needs of women (who are more vulnerable to domestic violence and sexual assault in tent cities but several organized women's groups are standing up for the rights of women and children)

Advocacy Efforts

Supporting Policy Advocacy to express the voice of the Haitian people in rebuilding Haiti will be an important component of long-term rebuilding plans. Lambi Fund is committed to taking a leadership role in advocacy by speaking out on behalf of rural communities, by creating strong partnerships with a coalition of like-minded groups working together to rebuild Haiti, and by supporting the needs of women, particularly within the context of the rebuilding effort now underway. As foreign corporations and governments jockey for rebuilding contracts, the Haitian voice has been neglected.

This cannot continue; the voice of the majority must be heard.

In order to incorporate Haitians and their perspectives, Lambi Fund has developed a five point plan for prioritizing rebuilding in Haiti:

National sovereignty. The ownership of rebuilding Haiti must come from the Haitian people. Real change must come from the majority poor. Not from politicians. Not from the elite. And not from foreign governments. Haitians must be the change agents through participatory democracy.

Decentralization. The migration of over 500,000 earthquake survivors from the rubble of Port-au-Prince to rural Haiti offers the opportunity to create a decentralized infrastructure that can lead to regional centers for economic development, better roads, public education, health care, social services and access to potable water and sanitation.

Stimulate local economy. The earthquake offers a unique opportunity for the international community to work in partnership with Haitian peasant groups to increase our capacity to feed the country and support the local economy.

Rebuild Haiti right. In addition to true land reform, Port au Prince and other damaged towns must be rebuilt with disaster resistant building codes that are rigorously monitored. Rebuilding must be done by Haitians, who are desperately in need of a boost in fair and equitable employment opportunities.

Environment must be at the center of restoring Haiti. Deforestation represents one of the greatest threats to Haiti's food security. Restoration of the environment is crucial to sustaining a functioning economy and productive agricultural sector, providing sufficient employment, and recreating natural buffers against inevitable environmental challenges, which include climate change.

Lambi Fund recognizes the critical role that will be played by women and farmers in the rebuilding of Haiti, and will continue to advocate for their inclusion in the creation of a plan and a new vision for Haiti.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Father Eddy Eustache on May 07, 2010

Mental Health Services at Partners In Health/ZL

PBS NewsHour recently interviewed Father Eddy Eustache, a priest and psychologist who serves as Director of Mental Health and Psychosocial Services for Zanmi Lasante, PIH's sister organization in Haiti. Below is an excerpt from the interview. Read the full piece at the link below: Q: What are the most common mental health challenges you are seeing in Haiti at this point?

A: Almost four months after the earthquake we are seeing people having various kinds of emotional distress responses. These include difficulty sleeping, heart palpitations, somatic complaints, and significant sadness, worry and anxiety. Some of these can be seen as normal reactions to a highly abnormal situation. However, the level of distress for many is severe. We also see people who have developed psychotic reactions, and other more acute mental health problems, since the earthquake.

One major challenge is a general lack of services in Haiti to address significant mental health problems. Haiti had few mental health professionals, and limited organized mental health services prior to the earthquake. There was not a clear understanding of the prevalence of mental health problems in Haiti prior to the earthquake, but we can expect that the mental health dimensions of the earthquake, overlaid on the pre-existing issue of poverty, will have significant ramifications for mental health. Our hope is to further develop the services needed to assist with such problems, in a culturally appropriate way, for the long-term.

Q: How are mental health workers trying to address the needs?

A: Interventions are needed that respect people's capacity to recover from such an event, that do not pathologize normative responses to such a terrible circumstance, that do not risk harm to individuals, that have some evidence for their efficacy, and that are appropriate to the Haitian context.

At Zanmi Lasante [Partners in Health] we have expanded our team to 17 psychologists from three prior to the earthquake, and to more than 50 staff focused exclusively on mental health and psychosocial services. We have been working ... to provide communal opportunities for mourning, to develop community-based supportive interventions in collaboration with schools and churches, and we have expanded basic clinical services.

This has included training of doctors and nurses in management of acute mental health problems, and planning for expansion of the system of care to include community health workers attuned to mental health, and development of effective referral networks to providers.

Read the full interview at the link below:

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Train Haitians to Help Rebuild their Country

By Chris Sidell on April 29, 2010

Disaster Response Support Service

Hygeine Promotion Training
Hygeine Promotion Training

RedR has a training team in in Port-au-Prince who are delivering training to local Haitian staff employed by international NGOs, such as Save the Children, Tearfund, GOAL and many others. The training is designed to develop core skills in key areas such as logistics, water, sanitation, hygiene and security. To date, we have booked over 200 hours of course work and have delivered training to over 300 local staff from 12 different organizations. Requests for training come in daily and we are working hard to meet that demand so that our vital capacity building work can continue.

The training is based on our Disaster Response Support Service. Our trainers have been delivering on-the-job coaching and short training courses to aid workers in essential disciplines during the early phases of the response so that aid workers are not distracted from their work. As the focus of efforts moves towards recovery and reconstruction, RedR will respond with longer and typically classroom-based courses to meet changing training needs.

Thanks to our donors, our programme is already making a real difference in improving the effectiveness of aid agencies working to rebuild peoples’ lives in Haiti.

Sphere Training
Sphere Training
WASH Training
WASH Training
Security Training
Security Training

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on April 20, 2010

Stand With Haiti: Three-Month Progress Report

In response to the devastation following the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that ravaged Haiti on January 12, 2010, Partners In Health (PIH) and its sister organization, Zanmi Lasante (ZL), with 4,403 local staff and a large network of public hospitals and health centers, immediately began delivering treatment and care to earthquake survivors in Port-au-Prince and across the Central and Artibonite Departments.

The long-term ramifications of this disaster will be significant and far-reaching. To address them, PIH/ZL has taken on relief, recovery, and rebuilding activities in three core areas: clinical services, social and economic support services, and health systems strengthening. This report outlines PIH/ZL’s activities in these program areas from January 12 through April 12, 2010. Highlights include:

• In the first month after the earthquake, PIH/ZL emergency medical efforts treated 4,961 critically injured patients through facility-based interventions, set up, stocked, and staffed 25 operating rooms, identified roughly 1,000 additional patients and referred them to collaborating medical relief organizations, and evacuated 140 patients to the USNS Comfort and hospitals abroad.

• PIH/ZL established clinics in four settlement sites to serve the basic healthcare needs of 88,000 displaced people in Port-au-Prince. Since January 25, these four clinics have treated more than 50,000 patients.

• During the first three months, PIH/ZL hired 358 additional local staff, shipped more than 422 tons of medicines, supplies and equipment, and deployed 516 clinical and technical volunteers.

• PIH/ZL has already supported more than 10,000 people and their families with social or economic support in the form of cash, food, agriculture assistance, educational support, jobs, or other services over the course of the past three months.

• Bolstered capacity at our 12 clinical sites in the Central Plateau and Artibonite to meet the needs of both thousands of injured survivors and tens of thousands of displaced people, who are in need of basic health services.

PIH/ZL approaches “building back better” in Haiti with the same values and principles that have guided our work for many years, namely: partnership with the Government of Haiti to achieve sustainable, long-term improvements to the country’s public health system; pragmatic solidarity with the Haitian people to address their basic needs; and a comprehensive approach to help lift communities out of poverty.

Please open the attached PDF for the full report.


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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Felicia Montgomery on April 14, 2010

How You've Helped Quake Survivors Connect in Haiti

Robenson Sanon interviews quake survivors
Robenson Sanon interviews quake survivors

Thanks to the quick response of Global Giving donors like you, Internews was able to immediately initiate a media response to the devastating earthquake in Haiti within days and continues to meet the information needs of the people of Haiti post-earthquake.

Your support has funded the production of over 40 humanitarian broadcasts to date: Internews Network’s daily humanitarian information program, Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen, began January 21, and reaches Haitians via 27 local radio stations, with information on safety, health, aid and reconstruction. The program is reported and produced by local journalists, who convey useful information to listeners in camps, makeshift shelters, and homes.

The show’s practical health and nutrition advice is saving lives. Even simple information can have a wide impact on the well-being of earthquake survivors. Along with receiving information, listeners rely on the program as a means to communicate their needs to the government and aid agencies.

- Frantz Larsen’s five-month-old child had been trying to drink cow’s milk for several days, after Frantz’s wife stopped breastfeeding and Frantz had been trying without success to buy milk formula. When Frantz heard a radio report that said babies should be breastfed for at least six months, he told reporters he encouraged his wife to breastfeed the baby again.

- Armand said he now makes sure his children take soap with them to camp latrines to wash up, after hearing a report on the humanitarian broadcast, Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen (News You Can Use), about disease risks incurred by people who do not wash their hands when leaving the toilet.

Internews as partners in the community: Earthquake survivors respect and trust the Internews team in Haiti. We receive over 100 SMS/text messages a day. Questions are aggregated and incorporated into the programming, and we deploy journalists to investigate and report on issues of most interest to the people.

Sample SMS/text messages received on February 23: “My name is Richard and I live in Delmas 75. I commend you for the right information you bring to the country.”

“We live in the village Renesans, and we have received no official visit… not even a bottle of water… We ask for help for the village of Renesans. Thank you.”

“Please, tell us where we can find tents and tarpaulins, and where we should get them, because I have a nurse with many children, and there one who is sick because he sleeps outside.”

Direct Link between Aid Agencies and Earthquake Survivors: Enfomasyon Nou Dwe Konnen provides a direct link between listeners like these and the aid agencies who are providing direct services. Internews’ radio journalists have established contact with all major humanitarian players and routinely carry public service messages from the agencies and report on their aid work.

Dimitry Leger of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) said “I find Internews invaluable for getting [UNFPA] messages out to the affected population. News You Can Use is a huge hit among Haitians, and its young Haitian journalists are well-trained and very sharp. Their questions give me insights on how the UN could do a better job.”

Melanie Brooks of CARE International explained how her agency relies on the radio program: “CARE has already used the program to explain to people how to improve their shelters to make them waterproof for the rainy season – information that will help keep people dry and prevent illness. Having access to such a wide audience through the Internews program allows CARE to reach far more people with important messages than we could on our own.”

Internews Reporters in Haiti Cover Clinton/Bush Visit: Presidents Bill Clinton and George Bush traveled to Port-au-Prince on March 22 in the efforts to continue raising awareness and funds for Haiti. They met with President René Préval and afterwards, held a joint press conference. Local Internews reporters in Haiti covered President Préval's remarks and interviewed local people about the event.

After the press conference, which was attended by local and international press, the Presidents visited Champs de Mars, one of the largest IDP sites in Port-Au-Prince. They met with the Haitian people and spoke to them about their lives in the camps. For about an hour, they addressed solutions and fund raising and provided support to the locals. The crowds poured out to shake their hands and to get a glimpse.

Thank you - Global Giving donors. You are helping make all this possible. Please leave us feedback, comments or vote on the usefulness of this report.

Internews Local Journalists Cover Press Conference
Internews Local Journalists Cover Press Conference
Haitian Father Listens to News on Surivival
Haitian Father Listens to News on Surivival
Internews Haiti team broadcasting
Internews Haiti team broadcasting 'Hope for Haiti'

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on April 13, 2010

Haiti Relief Efforts- 3 Months

Save the Children plans to provide emergency assistance to save lives, alleviate suffering, and support the recovery of 800,000 people (including 470,000 children) affected by the 12 January 2010 earthquake in Haiti. We plan to transition into longer term rehabilitation and reconstruction to ensure a better future for Haiti’s children.

Number of beneficiaries we plan to reach: 800,000 Number of total beneficiaries reached so far: *553,009

*number includes distributed medical supplies and medicines to support beneficiaries over 6 wk period. Please note that the beneficiary numbers have not been updated since sitrep 32 as the team is currently going through an exercise of verifying numbers.


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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on March 27, 2010

Partners In Health's Medium and Longer-Term Plans for Earthquake Recovery

The long-term ramifications of the earthquake in Haiti, already the poorest country in the western hemisphere by a wide margin, are staggering. One month following the devastation, PIH began to move beyond the acute phase of response in order to formulate and execute medium and long-term plans for the rebuilding of lives and livelihoods, communities, and the public health system. Though we are sure our plans will continue to develop as the needs on the ground evolve, on February 12, 2010, PIH launched a Fund for Building Back Better in Haiti to support a three-year recovery and rebuilding plan with an initial budget of $125 million.

Below we have outlined the current projected activities and efforts that the Fund will support with the knowledge that the scope of our interventions, and therefore the size of the Fund, may grow in the months to come.

Medium-Term Activities (1-6 months)

1. Continue urgent medical and surgical care operations for earthquake survivors.

PIH/ZL will sustain our expanded volunteer deployment, logistics, warehousing and distribution system in support of the increased demand for medicines, medical and surgical supplies and equipment and the need for specialized surgical and medical teams to reinforce and help train our existing staff. These efforts will continue to serve patients in Port-au-Prince at the University Hospital (HUEH) and at PIH/ZL facilities in the Central Plateau and Artibonite Departments.

2. Sustain community-based care and mobile clinic outreach within Port-au-Prince.

PIH will operate mobile clinics serving between 80,000 and 100,000 displaced people within five or six communities in Port-au-Prince to provide comprehensive primary health care, reproductive health services, treatment of pediatric malnutrition, HIV testing and referrals, and disease treatment and prevention.

3. Provide assistance to displaced people and affected households in PIH/ZL's catchment area.

In collaboration with partner organizations and through our existing community-based social and economic support initiatives, PIH/ZL will help strengthen food & agriculture, housing, safe water, education, and income generation programs for the most vulnerable people in the areas we serve.

4. Build capacity for acute trauma counseling and overall mental health services within our sites.

With key partners, PIH/ZL is conducting an initial needs assessment at our sites and in the spontaneous camps. The assessment is particularly focused on identifying consultation psychiatry needs, developing a training plan for staff and community health workers, outlining additional medicine requirements, and defining key psychosocial support activities.

5. Support the social and economic needs of Zanmi Lasante's more than 4,000 staff.

Almost all our Haitian staff have lost family members in the earthquake and are taking in relatives who have nowhere to go. To ensure these front-line workers, the majority of whom are medical personnel and community health workers, can continue to perform their jobs over the long-term, PIH/ZL is distributing financial assistance to staff to help them with basics during this very difficult time.

Long-Term Initiatives (2-3 years)

1. Expand capacity for specialty clinical services needed to care for earthquake survivors.

PIH/ZL will develop new facility and community-based capacity for post-operative care, rehabilitation and physical therapy, and mental health services by forging strategic partnerships, recruiting additional expertise, and conducting extensive training. Surgical care will be greatly strengthened at all of our facilities in the Central Plateau and Artibonite, with higher-level surgery available at five hospitals and capacity for emergency obstetrical care available at all sites.

2. Strengthen our clinical operations and the public health system.

In partnership with the Haitian Ministry of Health, PIH/ZL will strengthen our network of community health workers as well as the clinical operations at 12-15 hospitals and health centers that provide comprehensive health care to our catchment area in the Central Plateau and Artibonite Departments, which together may grow from 1.2 million to 1.7 million people.

3. Build and renovate public health infrastructure.

Construction and renovation projects, in the form of new hospitals, training centers, pharmacy/warehousing buildings, surgical suites, outpatient clinics, and inpatient wards, will take place at six sites already identified.

4. Strengthen the public medical and nursing education system in Haiti.

A new hospital and teaching center will be constructed in the town of Mirebalais, which is estimated to serve roughly 450 patients per day. The Mirebalais facility will serve as one of Haiti's national teaching hospitals, with PIH/MSPP facilities in the Central Plateau and Artibonite serving as satellite teaching sites.

5. Expand PIH/ZL's programs for social support, community development, and poverty alleviation.

Roughly 2,000 additional community health workers will be hired and trained to work in tandem with mobile clinics, health centers, and hospitals to expand the reach of services. Funding Need

On February 11, 2010, Dr. Paul Farmer articulated his view on the crisis and need in Haiti: "We are in uncharted territory here, and a certain humility about diagnoses, prescription, and prognosis is surely warranted...So what is to be done? ... Might addressing the acute needs of the displaced and injured afford us a chance to address the underlying chronic condition?" After some reflection, he summarized, "So the diagnosis is: natural disaster in a setting of great and longstanding privation... Haiti needs to build back better and stronger than before. This, then, should be the treatment plan."

While PIH/ZL's role in building back better is only a small piece of Haiti's overall plan, our vision of accompanying Haiti has resounding effects in the small country and beyond. As of February 12, 2010, we have raised roughly $57 million toward our $125 million plan to build back better. Our expectation is that $15 million will be spent before July 1, 2010, and an estimated $110 million in the two to three years that follow. We welcome and encourage both longstanding and new partners to contribute to the STAND WITH HAITI Fund as a way to engage in sustained, long-term recovery to rebuild lives, livelihoods, and communities.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on March 27, 2010

Standing - and Walking - in Haiti

With thousands of survivors needing amputations to save their lives following the January 12 earthquake, the PIH/Zanmi Lasante team has been increasingly concerned with how to help amputee patients literally get back on their feet.

A partnership with Hôpital Albert Schweitzer (HAS) is starting to fit these patients with prosthetic devices. With a well-stocked factory in partnership with prosthetics manufacturer Hanger, HAS has already begun accepting patients referred by PIH/ZL from the Central Plateau and Artibonite regions.

In early March, the PIH/ZL team brought three patients with lower extremity amputations to HAS for their prosthetic fitting. Staff noted the immediate change in the women as soon as they received their new legs--they were each able to stand up and walk with the aid of parallel bars, and quickly left behind their fears, prejudices, and doubts with each determined step. PIH/ZL staff also report that the three women are now able to walk as well as kick soccer balls - and next up on their agenda is dancing.

These three women are just a few of the patients who have undergone procedures at our hospitals and will be receiving prosthetic care through this partnership. Thank you for enabling this work!

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Patti Mangan on March 27, 2010

Container Shipment updates thanks to donations

Thanks to our very generous financial and medical supply donors, VIDA responded to the devastating 7. 0 earthquake in Haiti by sending a total of two containers carrying over $1.5 million in medical supplies into the triage system in Port-au-Prince.

The emergency medical supplies and equipments were distributed to numerous field hospitals, operating (but badly damaged) hospitals and clinics, and medical mission teams all of whom were delivering life saving medical care to thousands of Haitians.

VIDA continues to collect donations - both financial and medical for future shipments. Please help us meet our project goals.

As Haiti turns to its long-term rebuilding phase, VIDA is finalizing plans with its partners to help rebuild destroyed hospitals and clinics in the badly damaged Petit Goave region, just west of Port-au-Prince.

Meanwhile the 8.8 earthquake in Chile occurred just weeks after- and our team responded immediately. We have added a Global Giving project for Chile that now needs your help. Please visit the project to see our needs and progress.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Britt Lake on March 15, 2010

Progress in Haiti and rebuilding projects

Two months after the earthquake that killed as many as 200,000 people in Haiti, GlobalGiving’s 17 partner organizations continue to make a meaningful impact on the ground. - The Lambi Fund has already sent cash disbursements to 43 different community organizations throughout rural Haiti to purchase food, clothing, medicine, and other essential supplies for the thousands of displaced persons who returned to the rural communities following the earthquake, also helping to fuel the local economy. - RedR is providing vital training to aid workers, particularly focusing on effective distribution and warehousing, as well as courses on how to manage people and projects in emergency situations. - Comprehensive Disaster Response Services is seeing between 300 to 800 patients daily and is assisting in the establishment of a new tent village for families with small children. - Within three weeks of the earthquake, Partners in Health sent 66 planeloads to Haiti with more than 235 medical volunteers – orthopedic surgeons, anesthesiologists, surgical nurses and other medical professionals – and roughly 100,000 lbs of medical supplies to support the large network of local health care providers already working in the country. As the focus of the work in Haiti begins to shift from relief to recovery, you can support some of the long-term rebuilding efforts that GlobalGiving’s partners are carrying out at: http://www.globalgiving.org/haiti-recovery/. As an added bonus, GlobalGiving is MATCHING at 30% online donations up to $1000 per person made to any of these projects on TUESDAY, MARCH 16. Thank you again for your amazing support for these relief efforts on the ground.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on March 10, 2010

Working with Displaced Communities

The camp at Parc Seminaire, Solino.
The camp at Parc Seminaire, Solino.

One of the important things about working with the community closely is that you both learn to respect each other. CHF focuses on community-based development. The workers we employ to clean up are from the community, and our community mobilizers are key to all these efforts. From David Humphries, CHF Communications Manager on the ground in Port au Prince: One of the community mobilizers, Civille, took me to his home in the improvised camp at Parc Seminaire in Solino, one of the areas we are surveying for building transitional shelters. 1500 families live in the camp so maybe 7,000 - 10,000 people. But the camp is downhill from the major settlements that they have abandoned, and with the rains, it had become a swamp. As Dede, my Haitian guide, said to me: “Welcome to the Third World.” They had tents that had been distributed by a relief agency, but the tents were soaked in mud, and the canal, which passed by the camp was blocked and had the stench of raw sewage. The children ran up to me shouting ‘Yo!’ and ‘Hey, you!’ and asking for their picture to be taken – not a common experience in Haiti, where people prefer to avoid the camera. In fact, despite their living conditions and this being a ‘red zone’ we were welcomed by everyone. Perhaps that is the benefit of working with the community. I hope that we can provide this area with suitable shelter as soon as possible.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Josette Perard on March 09, 2010

Earthquake Recovery Update- March 2010

Thanks for your support since the earthquake that devastated Haiti January 12th. With your help, the Lambi Fund of Haiti has been able to take extraordinary action to help meet the dire need throughout the country. Because of the Lambi Fund's deep ties with rural communities throughout Haiti, we are uniquely placed to support rural areas that have absorbed thousands of earthquake survivors that fled the rubble of Port-au-Prince, most with nothing more than the shirt on their backs. In the Haitian tradition of peasant solidarity, rural communities took in quake survivors and shared with them everything they had. As just one small example, the 80-year-old mother of one Lambi Fund staff member has taken in 39 people in her small house. As you can imagine, the already limited resources of rural community organizations quickly began to dry up, which is why we've devoted our immediate response primarily to providing financial resources to our trusted local partners so they can provide survivors with basic needs. Thanks to your support, 43 different community organizations throughout rural Haiti received cash disbursements to purchase food, clothing, medicine, and other essential supplies for the thousands of displaced persons who returned to the rural communities following the earthquake. This helped infuse the local economy as well. You are also making a difference with several women's groups in Port-au-Prince who lost everything in the earthquake, but are still standing up for the rights of women and children. With your additional support, you can continue to make a difference in Haiti by supporting what Lambi Fund has been doing in Haiti for the past 16 years - partnering with community organizations to strengthen their capacity to produce locally grown food, improve water access, expand pig and goat raising enterprises, and invest in community micro-credit funds. These programs allow more families to eat, more parents to work, and more children to go to school - all of which is fundamental to the long-term recovery and sustainability of Haiti. It is important to stress that the recovery will take time, as it has for major catastrophes before it, but with your continued commitment, Haiti will set itself on a new course of progress. On behalf of the Lambi Fund of Haiti and the people of Haiti, thank you for making all of this possible. Sincerely, Josette Perard Port-au-Prince, Haiti Lambi Fund of Haiti Country Director

Lambi Fund earthquake recovery meeting with locals
Lambi Fund earthquake recovery meeting with locals

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on March 09, 2010

Capacity Building Even in Emergencies

From David Humphries, CHF Communications Manager-- One of the key concepts that CHF works by is what we call ‘capacity building’. What this means is training the local people in a country so that by the time CHF leaves, they are able to continue the same level and quality of work – without us. Even in an emergency situation we practice this, and I had the good fortune this morning of visiting our heavy machinery technical specialist, Dale Lawson, training 12 Haitians in how to operate Caterpillar vehicles. One of the problems Haiti has faced before is a dearth of skilled labor so CHF has already undertaken a joint training program with Caterpillar to train Haitian operators (see [link to the public private partnerships piece]). But now, after the earthquake, demand for skilled operators has increased even more. I met Dale and his team on their first lesson. They were focusing on safety. The next stage will be basic maintenance – oiling, checking all the parts to make sure the vehicle is in good condition. Then they will start to get behind the controls. Our aim is for the trainees to reach international standards. Dale said: “In the west, they’d do all these basics at first in a parking lot. Here, they’ll be learning in a real environment.” Although my French is extremely rusty I was able to chat with the group of trainees, who were aged between 18 and 42. It was their first time working with CHF and despite most of them being very young, some had up to four children. After a while they asked for a basic English lesson. One of the most popular statements was “I want to go to Miami!” but at the end one of them grinned and told me: “We want to always work for CHF!” I hope they always work operating heavy machinery. Not for CHF, but for the private sector in Haiti, as it recovers from this earthquake and directs its own development for the future.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on March 01, 2010

'Build Back Better'

In his testimony today before a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee, Save the Children President Charles MacCormack urged Congress to help ensure a brighter future for Haiti and its children by strengthening the capacity of its government, citizens and private sector.

He noted that well-coordinated collaboration between the Haitian government and civil society, the United Nations, the U.S. and other donors and non-governmental organizations, such as Save the Children, was essential to addressing both the immediate and long-term development needs of the country.

MacCormack shared his observations from his two visits to Haiti since the magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck over three weeks ago. "While the Haitian people are extremely resilient and have exhibited much patience, their challenge is daunting," said CharlesMacCormack. "It will take a collective effort today to give the children and families of Haiti a better tomorrow."

In his testimony, MacCormack said that it will take 10 years and a substantial investment to rebuild the country, and will require a coordinated and transparent response. To help the Haiti government redirect its funding into investments that would help in its recovery, MacCormack proposed that Congress expand Haiti's trade preferences to include additional exports, issue grants instead of loans to the Haitian government and support cancelling Haiti's nearly $1 billion international debt.

"Future funds must go to providing children and families access to health services, education and economic opportunities," said McCormack. "This is a long-term disaster and the U.S. must commit for the long-haul. Sustaining significant investment over the next 10 years will be critical to ensuring the well-being of children and their families."

MacCormack applauded President Obama's appointment of USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah to oversee the coordination of the U.S. humanitarian response to the Haiti earthquake but urged that this role be expanded to include the long-term development needs of the country.

"The U.S., with non-governmental organizations and donors, should intensify its commitment to building the capacity and systems of the Haitian government and Haitian civil society to lead and manage their own development," said MacCormack. "We must support Haitians in building back better for the children of Haiti."

Drawing on lessons learned from Save the Children's response to the 2004 Asian tsunami, MacCormack noted that putting Haitians at the center of their own development and recognizing the critical role of women and youth in the decision-making process would be essential for Haiti's recovery.

On the ground in Haiti for over 32 years, Save the Children launched one of its largest disaster responses ever. Save the Children has reached more than 200,000 children and adults, providing lifesaving food, medicines and supplies. In addition, the organization is working to protect vulnerable children, providing spaces to play and helping trace unaccompanied children to reunite them with their families.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on February 26, 2010

Port au Prince: A Race Against Time

Six weeks after the earthquake struck, David Humphries, Communications Manager for CHF International, is in Haiti. He will be producing daily blogs of the situation on the ground.

Port au Prince has changed since I visited last November. The hotel where I stayed has been obliterated. The shop where I bought food and water is now a pile of concrete. Colleagues’ houses where I enjoyed dinner are now pancaked.

Driving from the chaotic and crowded airport, internally displaced person camps are immediately evident. Large numbers of white tents — from relief efforts — are visible, but something else was visible — dark clouds.

In November the sun shone every day, but today the clouds are a sign of something to come.

Within a few hours, as darkness fell, torrential rain struck, like nothing I have seen in Europe or the US. In just twenty minutes the tropical rain had swamped roads. Of course, this was the moment when our car developed a flat tire and we had to rush for shelter while we found another vehicle. But this small inconvenience was just the briefest taste of what people living in tents were experiencing and will experience. ‘Tent cities’, whether made up of donated tents or makeshift can be seen everywhere. They are on roads, football fields, any open ground. Many families are camping in tents outside thier houses or on the side of a road; where one would expect to see a car parked, that’s where a family is living.

The rain storm was over soon and most of the rain evaporated from the roads. But this was a harbinger of what is to come. The rainy season will come soon — it begins as early as March — and is followed by the contiguous tropical storm season which lasts until November. Flooding will cause sanitation hazards and disease.

CHF is embarking on a project to produce over 5000 transitional shelters for families; building or improving temporary homes to allow Haitians to live in safe, sanitary conditions for up to several years as the major reconstruction takes place.

Looking at the rain, we all know it’s a race against time.

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CDRS: Supplies for Haiti's Earthquake Recovery

By Laila Karamally on February 25, 2010

New fundraising goal of $250,000!

Dear Supporters,

Due to the continuing need on the ground and in the absence of municipal healthcare workers and funding, the SHINE/CDRS mission in Haiti will be extended for four to six weeks.

With your support, we have collected in excess of $180,000. With the extension in mind, our aim is to reach fundraising goal of $250,000 which will enable us to run the services for the additional time period and handover at that point to local non profits.

We need medical volunteers to staff the main facility and outreach camps and mobile health units. Ground teams see between 300 to 800 patients daily, and are working closely with AEMIR Haiti to facilitate the distribution of much-needed food and water.

SHINE/CDRS is also assisting in the establishment of a new tent village for families with small children. We hope to put in place a medical camp that will attend to the needs of mothers-to-be and children.

Please visit us on our new website, www.shinehumanity.org. And now, Words of Appreciation for Todd Shea (Executive Director, CDRS):

1. “The success of IMANA mission is due to sincerity, quick action and most of all networking and collaboration. First credit goes to our relief chairman Ismail Mehr and Tod Shea of CDRS who acted fast and decided to make a team of IMANA, CDRS/SHINE and AIMER Haiti which brought further cooperation of other organizations like USAID to Zakat Foundation.”   Dr. Parvaiz Malik   President Federation of Islamic Medical Associations [FIMA]                                                       and Member IMANA Relief

2. "Todd I was really impressed with your dedication and hard work. I guess the word NO has no place in your dictionary. I was pleasantly surprised to come across people who knew of you once they saw you photos.”                M Azhar Ali  MD                 Feb 18, 2010

3. “ It was an honor  to serve with you Todd. ” Ronald A. Tomo MPA, CCP, CNA VP & Chief Information Officer Nassau University Medical Center
 February 9, 2010

                                  4.  “I want to thank you again for all you did for me from finding me a place to stay in DC, getting me fantastic transportation from Santo Domingo to Haiti, the city tour of P-a-P, the midnight egg sandwiches, and so much more. I consider the week I spent in Haiti the most important significant thing I have done professionally and again wish to thank-you for your part in making it happen.” Janet Jasper  Glen Ellyn, IL  60137                                         February 8, 2010

5. “Todd has really proved that even in very difficult circumstances, when there is a will there is a way and by creating a set up and  a platform , where we could all work was a great achievement. Rest of the components of the team starting from communication, logistics, nursing and doctors really blended very well and I can say with utmost confidence that this was the best combination. This model should be a good one for IMANA relief to expand on and refine.” Saeed Akhter MD, MPH, FACS Chairman and Professor of Surgery Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan February 14, 2010

6. "Todd,  I always knew you are doing a wonderful work with remarkable consistency and dedication but after visiting you in Haiti I am convinced.  Thank you for making our team's  stay so positive. Please keep up the good work."                                     Asim Ashary  CFO SHINE                                                     February 20, 2010

8. “We are all extremely proud of you Todd, it is not easy to do what you are doing. Thank you once again for taking such good care of all of us and keeping the atmosphere so positive.”                                                                                         Farzana Naqvi MD.   Board Member, SHINE                                                                           Feb 20, 2010

"I was deeply touched after reading all the attributes dedicated to your relentless efforts from these people who witnessed your commitment and hard work up close and first hand."                         Adeela Ahsan MD. Board Member, SHINE February 21, 2010

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on February 25, 2010

Haiti Still Needs Help!

Credit: Getty Images North America
Credit: Getty Images North America

Save the Children plans to provide emergency assistance to save lives, alleviate suffering, and support the recovery of 800,000 people (including 470,000 children) affected by the earthquake in Haiti. We plan to transition into longer term rehabilitation and reconstruction to ensure a better future for Haiti’s children.

Number of beneficiaries we plan to reach: 800,000

Number of total beneficiaries reached so far: *502,766 *number includes distributed medical supplies and medicines to support beneficiaries over 6 wk period

Credit: Getty Images North America
Credit: Getty Images North America

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on February 23, 2010

US Deputy Chief of Mission Visits CHF Projects in Petit Goave

Ambassador Lindwall with Marines and CHF Staff
Ambassador Lindwall with Marines and CHF Staff

US Deputy Chief of Mission David E. Lindwall visited Petit-Goave on Sunday, February 21. Accompanied by representatives from CHF and the U.S. Marines, the Deputy Chief of Mission visited a variety of sites in the area, including the hard-hit areas of downtown Petit-Goave and the devastated coastal neighborhood of Petite Guinee where CHF has been performing cash-for-work activities.

Discussing strategy
Discussing strategy

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on February 22, 2010

CHF's Cash for Work Program in Haiti Focusing on Women

Rosita St. Jean
Rosita St. Jean

CHF's cash for work programs are well underway in the cities of Port au Prince and the Petit Goave. Of the 586 workers currently employed in Petit Goave, 40% are women.

Marie Bonese Point Du Jour is a 35 year-old mother with a 9-year-old son and former businesswoman who lived in Port-au-Prince. after the earthquake she moved to Petit Goave and is now employed with a CHF cash for work team there.

Marie Bonese Point Du Jour

“I am content, I do not regret coming to Petit-Goâve after this catastrophe. This program enabled me to earn 2400 gourds (US$69) over the past two weeks. I would like to spend several weeks working like this, with an aim of saving a small sum which would enable me to get back on my feet and take care of my only son.” She added: “I will remain in Petit-Goâve for as long as possible because I feel safe here.”

Rosita Saint-Jean is a 56 year-old mother with 4 sons and a widow (prior to quake). She is a resident of Chabanne, next to the area of Petite Guinee, which was destroyed by the quake.

"The money that I earned from this program is a deliverance for me and my family. I will pay a small debt, then buy food to keep my sons healthy. I thank the person who gave this job to me," she says.

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Train Haitians to Help Rebuild their Country

By Chris Sidell on March 04, 2010

Urgent need for skills in Haiti

RedR sent a team to Haiti to assess what training and support would be needed as the international community works with Haitians to provide relief to people affected by the disaster.

The team’s work has shown that relief workers on the ground need more training in logistics - such as effective distribution and warehousing, as well as courses on how to manage people and projects in emergency situations. There is also a need for training and support in technical areas like camp management, site planning and structural assessment. And the team anticipate that training in water and sanitation will be needed once more permanent sites are planned.

Thanks to people like you, RedR was able to begin on-the-job training at the end of February with content delivered as short, open courses of one to two days duration.

Thank you so much for your support. Watch this space for further updates.

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Haiti Water Relief

By Wendell Adams on February 18, 2010

Haiti Relief Convoy

I traveled to Haiti on February 9th to meet with Rotary 4060 in Santo Domingo of the Dominican Republic. This was Rotary 4060’s Disaster Relief Committee meeting to plan, schedule, allocate donated funds, map and plan truck convoys to Port-au-Prince (PAP) and, to introduce WaterBrick to its members. It was decided that WaterBrick would be warehoused and distributed from 4060’s UN Cargo location in PAP. In PAP, I was introduced to and met with Dr. Claude Surena, President of Haiti’s Medical Association, to discuss their need for WaterBrick and how distribution would be implemented. Dr. Surena said they needed a minimum of 400,000 WaterBricks which would be 2 per their 200,000 tents requested from the United Nations that would arrive soon. Dr. Surena stated that water and food storage containers were necessary to establish sustainability for the homeless but that 750,000 was really needed to make a real difference. The first container load of WaterBricks is now on its way to Port-au-Prince in Haiti with additional manufacturing underway for many future loads to be delivered.

Also, we delivered food, medications and WaterBricks to the Good Samaritan Hospital and two orphanages in PAP. We then made commitments to return with additional WaterBricks and food on our next trip in early March. After our forty-hour convoy to deliver these much needed supplies and, without sleep, we returned back to Santo Domingo and I flew home on February 16th with a much better understanding about the needs of Haiti and its many homeless families. We need to continue our efforts with greater commitment and understanding that this is only the beginning of the worst; yet to come.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on February 17, 2010

Updates from CHF Haiti- Feb 16th

On February 16th, CHF completed the first payroll for its ongoing cash-for-work earthquake recovery project. In less than two hours, CHF paid 429 workers for their two-week participation removing rubble from streets, public buildings, and private homes in Petit Goave. This was the fastest and most orderly payroll CHF has ever seen in Petit-Goave. During the first two weeks of clean up activities in Petit Goave, workers removed nearly 1600 cubic meters of rubble and CHF has paid more than US$30,000 directly to workers.

Thank you for your continuing support of CHF as we work to put the people of Haiti back on their feet.

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CHF - Helping Rebuild Haiti

By Natalie Taggart on February 21, 2010

Stories of Hope from CHF's Cash-for-Work Program

Dorzely Octave is a 42 year old mother of eight children, aged between 10 and 24 years old. She is the head of household and supports her family alone. Before the earthquake, Dorzely had a small business selling coffee and bread and kept her supplies in a storage place in Delmas. But when the quake struck, the building was destroyed. All of her stock and materials inside were unsalvageable.

Dorzely is now part of CHF’s rubble removal team working Delmas. On February 8, she was working on Delmas 17 with the rest of her team. The ‘HIMO’ rubble removal teams are an essential element of recovery from earthquakes and other natural disasters. Not only do they undertake essential clean up work, they restore people’s livelihoods by employing them in cash for work activities that enable them to support their families. These teams are also empowering, as they employ Haitian men and women in the recovery efforts, making them active participants rather than passive ‘beneficiairies’. With purpose and a sense of solidarity, it becomes their recovery process.

CHF’s HIMO teams consist of 12 people, and we aim to have a balance of men and women – our experience is that women are capable of doing the same work as men in rubble removal. Dorzely says:

“I am proud to be part of this team. We are helping to clean the streets. I am able to help with the clean-up efforts. My job is to take the stones and debris and put it into the wheelbarrows. It is great to be a woman on this team because I am working with all of these men and I can prove that I am just as strong as they are.”

Dorzely was in a small town just on the outskirts of Port au Prince when the quake hit. She immediately tried to get back into the city to get to her house:

“My kids were in the house when the earthquake hit. I was so afraid because I was not with them. But when I came back to the city, I found them all alive with only some small injures. My house did not fall, but it is pretty damaged. One of my daughters is sick. With my first pay check I will take her to the doctor and buy her the medicine that she needs. With the second pay check I will try to purchase some of the items I lost and re-start my business.”

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Provide Medicine to Earthquake Victims in Haiti

By Vivian Stromberg on February 16, 2010

Zanmi Lasante Clinic Staff Continuing to Provide Around the Clock Care

Zanmi Lasante staff continue to work around the clock to provide care to the many injured and sick still arriving at Port-au-Prince's General Hospital (HUEH), as well as at their clinics and at field hospitals they set up during the first week after the earthquake.

MADRE has been working with Partners in Health to provide Zanmi Lasante with medicine and medical supplies.

Andrew Marx, Partners in Health's Director of Communications, recently returned from Haiti. In his words:

"...inspired is what I felt upon seeing our Haitian partner organization Zanmi Lasante spring into action, doing what they do best—what they've been doing for over 25 years—working in partnership with the residents of destitute communities to provide quality health care and essential social services."

Staff at the clinics and the hospitals have noticed a change in the type of injuries they are seeing. Many people who sustained non-life-threatening injuries during the earthquake are now coming in to seek treatment. Doctors are very worried about the high numbers of people who are at risk of infection from untreated wounds. MADRE will continue to work with our partners in Haiti to respond to the needs of people affected by the earthquake.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on February 16, 2010

Haiti-One Month Update

At the one-month mark of the crisis, Save the Children has reached 477,000 children and adult members of their families with lifesaving immediate relief.

*See attached document for full fact sheet


Attachments:

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CDRS: Supplies for Haiti's Earthquake Recovery

By Laila Karamally on February 11, 2010

Two more teams to head out of Southern California

SHINE/CDRS Haiti Update Feb 9th, 2010

SHINE/CDRS will deploy two of its own teams to Haiti. The first leaves out of Southern California on Feb 11th, and among the 12 team members are two SHINE board members, Asim Ashary (Chief Financial Officer) and Dr. Farzana Naqvi. The next group leaves on Feb 19th, and will consist of 24 doctors, nurses and non-medical personnel.

We are now in Week 3 of the Haiti mission. Operations are running smoothly on the ground. The main mulit-agency hospital in Bojeaux Barc continues to see upwards of 300 patients a day who present with a variety of issues - including post operative care, infections and primary health conditions. We are currently staffed by 25 volunteers from three different agencies across the United Sates, with each individual performing at a high level of excellency.

Medical volunteers are providing care out of the main hospital, as well as deploying to surrounding general hospitals, community hospitals and church clinics. They are also conducting two to three outreach missions daily to poor neighborhoods. On one occasion earlier this week, some of the volunteers working the night shift at the general hospital were able to save the life of a young woman who was hemorrhaging from an ectopic pregnancy. In addition, Executive DIrector Todd Shea met with actor/humanitarian Sean Penn and his foundation representatives on the ground last week and he has been asked to provide medical volunteers to the facilities that the foundation runs in Haiti.

SHINE/CDRS is also supplying food, water and medical supplies to camps housing the homeless, distributing rice, cornmeal, and other staple food products. We are continuing an appeal for donations of baby food, infant formula and oral rehydration salts.

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on February 08, 2010

A better future for Haiti’s children

Photo Credit: Getty Images North America
Photo Credit: Getty Images North America

“So many children and families have gone now three weeks with barely any steady food supply. We’ve met a pregnant mother who has told us that since the earthquake, her children had only been eating a meal a day, without vegetables or meat.” Halane Hussein, Save the Children’s Emergency Advisor in Haiti.

Save the Children's work is taking place in Port-au-Prince and in nearby communities; we are also monitoring the relocation of families away from Port-au-Prince.

Emergency Health Care • On February 4, 1,344 patients were treated by our 13 mobile health teams in 36 camps. • A new clinic was established in Gaston Margon, outside the main town of Carrefour, where conditions were significantly worse than the camps in the town • In Jacmel, our seven mobile teams vaccinated children against measles on February 4. They also distributed vitamins and screened children for malnutrition. • In Leogane, a field hospital supported by Save the Children and operated by a partner, World Wide Villages, has treated approximately 250 patients • Save the Children and another partner did an aerial assessment of rural areas and identified a site where some 250 homeless families were gathered. A mobile team health team was dispatched.

Food • Save the Children is conducting a two-week, mass food distribution to some 285,000 children and adults in Martisant and Tabarre, Port-au-Prince in cooperation with the World Food Program. To date, over 95,000 people have benefited from our food relief.

Water • In Port-au-Prince, Carrefour Feuilles and Jacmel, 29,000 children and adults have access to clean water though Save the Children. • Latrines and showers we have constructed are available to 13,800 people. • Save the Children and partner agencies are delivering water by tanker truck to distribution points we have created. • In Leogane, we distributed approximately 215,000 water purification tablets – providing more than 300 families with safe water. We also trained 12 health agents in household water treatment and hygiene promotion in the community.

Shelter and Non-Food Relief Items • 8,600 people have received essential non-food relief items, such as hygiene supplies and plastic sheeting for shelter. • 125 tents are being provided for a small settlement of homeless families in Cote de Fer. Blankets, jerry cans and hygiene kits will also be distributed. • The first distributions of items for some 580 families in Jamal will take place on February 6. • 1,000 family-size tents are being shipped by Save the Children from China, where the agency responded to that nation’s earthquake in 2008. • 100 semi-permanent structures for housing or other uses have been ordered.

Child Protection • 18 Child Friendly Spaces in Port-au-Prince and Jacmel have been opened. Each serves an average of over 100 children a day through structured, supportive activities. Save the Children plans to open hundreds of these essential sites for children. • Save the Children has trained 50 social workers from other nongovernmental organizations to provide psychosocial support to children, including training in child protection policies and how to conduct activities at our Child Friendly Spaces. • The agency has been requested by the UN to coordinate the reunification of separated children with their families.

Education • Save the Children will be among the lead agencies to rapidly restore education for children to provide them with a structured, secure environment. Our goal is to establish 3,000 temporary learning spaces targeting at least 80,000 children • We are assisting the Ministry of Education in a needs assessment to determine the number of schools that have been destroyed, partially damaged and those that were not damaged. The assessment will also identify the number of children and teachers in the affected areas. • Field visits by our staff in three camps found no teachers, but children and parents anxious for education to resume.

Livelihoods • Save the Children plans to offer “cash-for-work” to clear out irrigation channels for the up-coming planting season.

Save the Children has committed to a five-year Build Back Better initiative, which will take us from the relief and recovery phase to working with families to rebuild their communities. The strategy is similar to the five-year rebuilding initiative we launched in Aceh Province, Indonesia following the epic December 2004 tsunami. Our goal is to provide emergency assistance to save lives, alleviate suffering, and support the recovery of 800,000 people (including 470,000 children) affected by the earthquake, and transition into longer-term rehabilitation and reconstruction to ensure a better future for Haiti’s children.

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CDRS: Supplies for Haiti's Earthquake Recovery

By Laila Karamally/Todd Shea on February 04, 2010

Field Update

Shea briefs doctors
Shea briefs doctors

Dear Friends and Supporters,

SHINE/CDRS started from nothing on January 14th. Now we assist with a multi-agency effort that has saved hundreds of lives and taken some of the pressure off of tertiary care hospitals. As a team, we have a wealth of disaster relief experience and a strong partnership with a reputable local organization. To date, we have: Delivered medical care to over 4,000 patients

Delivered food aid and water to thousands affected by the quake

Facilitated over 100 medical staff and logistics support volunteers

Maintained a well-stocked pharmacy

A secure compound with professional security staff and around the clock support with four vehicles and six local employees

We are pleased to announce that we are the proud recipient of a grant from the Canadian agency, IDRF (International Development and Relief Foundation) (www.idrf.ca) which covers much-needed food aid, water and medical supplies needed for earthquake survivors.

We now need your support with a few more key resources and pieces of equipment to enhance our capabilities and service delivery. Our running costs are $10,000 a week to keeping existing services going. You have helped us come so far- Please help us see this mission successfully through till its conclusion in early March.

To view a list of the supplies that we need, please see the attached file.

To those of you who have deployed with us, our deepest thanks and appreciation. They have some kind words of feedback to offer us. Monica Adorno, an emergency responder who plans to redeploy says: “Todd Shea is simply awesome. What SHINE/CDRS has accomplished on the ground with so little is staggering..”

Dr. Nabile Safdar, also of IMANA, adds: “SHINE/CDRS is bringing their experience to the relief effort in Haiti. For many IMANA Relief volunteers, Todd Shea and his crew were among the first to greet them at the airport, help arrange for transportation, and provide valuable debriefings regarding what to expect.”

For more information, please contact Laila Karamally at 714-261 1044 or lailakaramally@cdrspakistan.org

Thank you, Todd Shea Executive Director Comprehensive Disaster Response Services Bojeux Parc Joint Medical Relief Mission (CDRS/SHINE, IMANA, Destiny World Outreach and Aimer Haiti) Haiti Cell Phone: 011-509-3790-2108 e-mail: toddshea@cdrspakistan.org


Attachments:

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Laura Lindamood on February 03, 2010

See the impact of your support!

TIME video on radio news in Haiti
TIME video on radio news in Haiti

Two recent videos highlight the work you're supporting in Haiti.

From TIME magazine and Unicef, the videos show the work of local journalists in Haiti, producing daily news and distributing radios so those affected by the earthquake have accurate information about aid, health, and recovery.

Thank you again for your support! Please share these videos with others who might be interested in humanitarian media in Haiti.

Links:

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Christine Hamann on February 03, 2010

3 Weeks Later: An update on PIH's Earthquake Response

MedEvacing a young patient in Haiti
MedEvacing a young patient in Haiti

PIH had more than 100 doctors, 600 nurses, and a total of 4,000 Haitian employees on the ground in Haiti working from 12 existing PIH medical facilities in Haiti before the earthquake struck on January 12th. • PIH quickly established field hospitals in Port-au-Prince, helping set up 20 operating rooms, 12 of which were able to function around the clock. • PIH established a comprehensive triage and relief transfer system to move patients back and forth from Port-au-Prince to PIH sites in the Central Plateau and Lower Artibonite Valley. • PIH is evacuating patients in critical condition to hospitals in the United States and Dominican Republic as well as to the U.S.N.S. Comfort. • PIH has sent 66 plane loads with more than 235 medical volunteers – orthopedic surgeons, anesthesiologists, surgical nurses and other medical professionals – and roughly 100,000 lbs of medical supplies to support the large network of PIH’s local health care providers already working in Haiti. • The long-term ramifications in Haiti are going to be significant and far-reaching with a new, large group of vulnerable and displaced people. PIH has the experience and commitment to Stand With Haiti for many years to come.

Looking ahead, PIH’s efforts will be spent in three core areas: 1) supporting the public sector’s ability to provide health care; 2) mobilizing people at the grassroots level to participate in the health care system; and 3) addressing the mid- and long-term health, social, and economic ramifications of the resettlement of tens of thousands of people from Port-au-Prince to areas where PIH works.

A surgical team at PIH
A surgical team at PIH's main hospital in Cange, Haiti
The church in Cange, Haiti - turned into a patient ward
The church in Cange, Haiti - turned into a patient ward

Links:

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on February 02, 2010

Overview of Save the Children’s response

Number of beneficiaries we plan to reach: 600,000 Number of total beneficiaries reached so far: 172,751 Overview of Activities by Sector:

Non-Food Items (NFIs) Distribution: 8600 people are benefitting from NFIs Save the Children (SC) has distributed

WASH: Approximately 16,500 beneficiaries are receiving clean water Health: Save the Children has carried out 2857 medical consultations in the last week, including 660 children under 5 years through the mobile clinics. Save the Children is responsible for providing health services in 32 camps/locations. Save the Children is playing a significant role in strategic discussions with World Health Organization (WHO) in the national health cluster, and is also responsible for leading the sub-national health cluster in Leogane and the sub-cluster for mobile clinics in Jacmel.

The priority of the health cluster is moving towards provision of primary health services through mobile clinics and fixed health facilities. A national immunization campaign is planned to start next week.

Nutrition: · 31 nutritional and 109 health agents from the commune of Leogane have been trained as breastfeeding promoters and a number of these will be trained as breastfeeding counselors next week.

Child Protection · 17 Mobile Child Friendly Spaces are up and running in Port-au-Prince (PAP) and Jacmel. Child Protection programs will soon be starting in Leogane as well.

Food/Livelihoods: · SC food distributions have reached over 30,000 beneficiaries thus far. This number will increase greatly once World Food Programme (WFP) distributions in PAP begin tomorrow and continue for the next 2 weeks.

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Medical Supplies for Hospitals in Haiti

By Patti Mangan on February 01, 2010

Twelve more pallets headed to Haiti

Just an update to let our supporters know that we have collected an additional 12 pallets of medical supplies this week - with more coming in daily. As the materials arrive they are sorted, documented and then arranged on wooden pallets so they can be shipped safely to the destination and distributed in an organized manner.

The medical supplies are collected from many partners in the Bay Area - hospitals and clinics that we have long standing relationships with.

Our work has a threefold purpose- disaster relief, general medical relief year long in Latin America and saving/diverting what would be medical waste from Bay Area landfills.

If you work in the medical industry and can benefit from our life saving work - please contact us!

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Train Haitians to Help Rebuild their Country

By Chris Sidell on February 01, 2010

Identifying Training and Support Needs

RedR’s assessment team is now looking at what support aid agencies need as they work to deliver emergency aid to people affected by the earthquake. Technical training in the delivery of emergency water, sanitation, hygiene, shelter and logistics is high on the list of priorities, while international and local relief workers are also likely to require training in security and camp and project management.

Our needs assessment team is also examining training needs in the implementation of humanitarian standards and best practice in the field, such as technical standards under the SPHERE framework, the Humanitarian Accountability Framework aimed at making humanitarian action accountable to beneficiaries, and People in Aid, which promotes good practice in management and support of aid personnel.

Donations received from donors to Global Giving and other RedR supporters have allowed RedR to deliver an initial two-month training programme: with your generous support we hope to be able to extend this to a 12 month programme.

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Partners In Health Haiti Earthquake Recovery

By Dr. Paul Farmer on February 01, 2010

Haiti: From Rescue to Reconstruction

Dr. Paul Farmer, PIH co-Founder and United Nations Deputy Special Envoy for Haiti, recently testified at the “Haiti: From Rescue to Reconstruction” hearing of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

"I am at my core optimistic about the possibilities before us and the potential of our support to help rescue and transform our poorest neighbor," stated Paul in his submitted testimony. "The response from citizens of the United States to the recent events in Haiti has been overwhelming and encouraging. There is the promise of solidarity by our leadership to make long-term commitments to the kinds of investments needed in Haiti—and to fulfilling them."

"For two centuries, the Haitian people have struggled for basic human and economic rights, the right to health care, the right to education, the right to work, the right to dignity and independence,"he continued. "These goals, which Haitians share with people all over the world, should direct our policies of aid and rebuilding."

Read and watch the complete testimony at the link below:

Links:

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Provide Medicine to Earthquake Victims in Haiti

By Vivian Stromberg on February 22, 2010

Haiti: Meeting Medical Needs Around the Country

Equipping Medical Staff in Haiti

MADRE has been working with Partners in Health to support Zanmi Lasante as they continue providing emergency care for the earthquake survivors in Port-au-Prince and for those who have managed to flee the city.

Through the support and cooperation of many aid agencies, within the first days after the earthquake, the general hospital in Port-au-Prince (HUEH) was equipped to receive survivors. Since then, medical staff has been working around the clock to treat the many severe injuries people sustained during the disaster.

Zanmi Lasante medical staff has also been receiving patients in their clinics and at field hospitals around Haiti to deal with the flow of patients fleeing Port-au-Prince. Medical staff has reported that the need for orthopedic surgeons is dropping, but that there is an increased need for post-operational care.

Ophelia Dahl, Executive Director of Partners in Health, reported from her trip to Haiti this week that the hospitals and clinics are still receiving people with untreated injuries, a full two weeks after the disaster.

Women's Health Delegation Responds to the Most Pressing Health Needs in Haiti

MADRE partnered with Circle of Health International (COHI) to send several teams of women's health workers into Haiti over the last two weeks. Seven volunteers are now on the ground in Haiti, working out of Fond Parisien, a Haitian town on the border with the Dominican Republic. Every day, more earthquake survivors arrive in packed buses as they flee the devastation of Port-au-Prince. In addition to serving the general population of survivors, the volunteers are caring for pregnant women and victims of sexual abuse.

One team member has begun the Rapid Health Assessment, an assessment to identify the most pressing women's health needs. To this end, a group of Haitian women have been hired to conduct interviews and they are currently being trained in interviewing skills.

Providing Medical Care to the Most Vulnerable

MADRE is working with SOFA, a national Haitian women's organization, to provide medical services to earthquake survivors. SOFA and MADRE partnered in 1996 to build Klinik Fanm, the first Haitian clinic dedicated exclusively to women's health and human rights. Though the clinic building was damaged in the earthquake, the doctors and women's health practitioners have managed to set up a temporary clinic for survivors, and they are treating a steady stream of patients every day.

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GlobalGiving Relief Fund for Haiti Earthquake

By Britt Lake on February 01, 2010

Funds are getting to Haiti!

Thanks to your generosity, almost a million dollars from about 13,000 individual donors is making its way to Haiti for earthquake relief efforts. Thank you! GlobalGiving’s 17 partner organizations on the ground are helping provide emergency medical care, shelter, and food in the immediate post-earthquake efforts and providing longer-term support in areas including rebuilding and training. Impact on the ground is already being seen, including:

- Deep Springs International distributed enough clean water tablets to purify over 100,000 liters of water at a school in Leogane, 1 million liters of water in two field hospitals, and an additional half million liters will be distributed throughout the countryside by mobile medical teams. (www.globalgiving.org/4582)

- Internews is now airing daily humanitarian information radio programs on 21 local and national stations in Haiti. Reported by local journalists, information includes where to find water, tips on avoiding water-borne illnesses, location of medical clinics and special camps for children and orphans, plans for recovery and jobs, and more. (www.globalgiving.org/4572)

- CDRS assisted in setting up a multi-agency field hospital at Bojeux Parc, right at the city limits of Port Au Prince, which is now seeing up to 200 patients a day. (www.globalgiving.org/4592)

Four new projects focusing on Haiti earthquake relief efforts have been added recently to the GlobalGiving site. They are: 1) Architecture for Humanity - to develop a long-term rebuilding plan for sustainable housing, schools, and community centers. (www.globalgiving.org/4605

2) Freeplay Radio – to provide robust, solar-powered radios to earthquake survivors so that they can access critical information (www.globalgiving.org/4608)

3) GHESKIO Center – to replenish supplies of a local Haitian hospital so that it can continue humanitarian and emergency care (www.globalgiving.org/4611)

4) Water Missions International – to provide solar-powered water purification systems that can be used by communities in both the long- and short-term relief efforts (www.globalgiving.org/4598)

You can read more firsthand accounts and project updates from our partners in Haiti at http://www.globalgiving.org/haiti-earthquake-updates/

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Safe Water & On-going Relief in Haiti

By Ruth Entwistle on January 29, 2010

Aquatabs Arrive!

Gadyen Dlo Station Set up
Gadyen Dlo Station Set up

January 27th: First Shipment of Aquatabs Arrives! “Our first distribution was to a school building in Leogane. Several hundred people are living there with no access to clean water. We distributed enough tabs to purify over 100,000 liters of water at the school!” John Smith, DSI Volunteer Additional distributions include: -Two field hospitals received enough Aquatabs to purify 1 million liters. Each patient receives a strip of tabs. -Mobile doctor team distributing tabs as they go into the countryside. An additional ½ million liters will be treated -A distribution was held in accord with the US Marines outside one of their camps “People are excited to get the tabs because many of them understand the dangers of their water situation. Also, they know how to use them already.” A special thank you to the people of Lanxess for their donation of Aquatabs. Additional News: Water Treatment Training: 150 health agents and 36 Monitrices (community health workers) have been trained and provided with Aquatabs to distribute Buckets: Negotiations with the local bucket factory are complete. Jolivert: Jolivert, our first production site in northern Haiti, is producing 136 liters per day of Gadyen Dlo (liquid chlorine).

5 Survive In this Home, Including an Infant
5 Survive In this Home, Including an Infant

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on January 29, 2010

Video/Panoramic View in Haiti

“The spirit of the Haitian people has been remarkable. The word resilience does not do it justice. Our national staff has come back to work, often under incredibly difficult circumstances, to help the children of Haiti when they need it the most. On the streets—where tens of thousands still sleep each night—and in hundreds of makeshift camps that have sprung up in clearings amongst the rubble—there is still a sense of community where neighbours and strangers alike are working together to help each other survive.” - Lee Nelson, Country Director, Save the Children in Haiti

An amazing 360 panoramic view to give a sense of what it is like for children and their families living in impromptu camps: http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/haiti360/

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Urgent Information for Haiti’s Earthquake Victim

By Laura Lindamood on January 28, 2010

Critical Information Reaching Haitians

Internews’ daily humanitarian information program, Nouvelles-Utiles, is now airing on 21 local and national radio stations in Haiti since beginning daily broadcast on January 21. Reported by local journalists, stories in the program have included: where to find water, tips on avoiding water-borne illnesses, the location of medical clinics and special camps for children and orphans, plans for recovery & jobs, and more.

Radio stations are eager to air the programming, and individuals are grateful for the information. “People are stunned, dazed, and they’re still walking around in a bit of a dream wondering what’s going on with their lives, and I think one little bit of certainty they can have is to know what’s going on around them,” said Yves Colon, Internews Journalism Advisor in Haiti.

“Haiti is a poor country – we have so many troubles. It’s really nice to know that people are thinking about us,” said Gaelle Alexis, a Haitian journalist who was rescued by her husband after 10 hours under rubble.

On Friday, January 22, Alexis worked with Internews to translate MTV’s Hope for Haiti Now telethon into Creole for Haitian listeners. Internews facilitated the broadcast of the telethon into Haiti together with national radio and television stations with support from MTV, Westwood One, the BBC and CNN. (See Links for a video of the broadcast).

Thank you for your continued support – the flow of news to Haitians is critically important, and with your help, Internews will continue to make sure that local-language, accurate information reaches the people who need it most.

Links:

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Save the Children Races to Children & Families

By Rebecca Bryant on January 28, 2010

Judith Louise and her Baby Helped by Save the Children

Photo Credit: Getty Images
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Judith Louise lost her 6-year-old son in the earthquake and very nearly lost her 15-day-old baby boy, who does not yet have a name because he has not been baptized.

"When the earthquake struck, I was in the bedroom," said Judith Louise.

"I tried to run, but it knocked me down and I couldn't go back inside to grab the child. Outside, they asked me where was my baby. I told them I didn't know."

"The baby's grandfather went back inside and he saw that the baby had fallen on the ground. The wall had collapsed next to the baby and he was covered in dust. When they pulled my child out, I thought he was dead."

Judith Louise's husband, Friesnel, said, "The baby wasn't moving or breathing. It took a long time to revive him. When Judith Louise started nursing him, though, he came back to life."

"We were lucky to find the child alive," said Friesnel.

"Our house was completely destroyed. We lost everything. Everyone's house has been destroyed, so now we are equal as one – you understand. We don't have anything to survive with. Even if we have money, we can't find anything to buy. Nobody is giving us anything. We're all suffering here."

Friesnel worries about how his family will survive, living in the streets.

Save the Children helps families like those of Judith Louise and Friesnel by providing medical and nutrition supplies.

"We need to rebuild our houses. Our baby is suffering because we don't even have money to buy milk. We need money to reorganize our lives. We need food to come to this country in order for all of us to survive."

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CDRS: Supplies for Haiti's Earthquake Recovery

By Laila Karamally on January 28, 2010

CDRS Update - January 27, 2010

Dear Friends and Supporters,

Fifteen days have passed since the 7.0 earthquake shook the island of Haiti, claiming 200,000 lives and leaving 3 million homeless. CDRS has been on the ground since January 14th, and in the words of CDRS executive director, Todd Shea, it has been “simply hell” out there. Early teams witnessed death and misery of an untold scale and even for the volunteers, it was too much to bear.

Chaos and confusion are now beginning to subside, and with improved coordination and the opening up of supply lines, the delivery of aid and medical care is gradually coming up to speed. We have much good news to report:

- SHINE/CDRS assisted in the identification, and setting up of a multi-agency field hospital at Bojeux Parc, right at the city limits of Port Au Prince, which is now seeing up to 200 patients a day. Congresswoman Maxine Waters visited the facility, and had praise to offer the collaborative Hatian and American effort. Following her visit, USAID facilitated the establishment of a fully-fitted air-conditioned operating tent where volunteer doctors are now able to perform more complicated procedures. - SHINE/CDRS continues to play an active role at the facility, providing ground support, supplies and food/water aid to assist in the running of the hospital, which is also providing post operative and outpatient services. - The agency is facilitating in the deployment of volunteers from the United States. Our ground staff meet the volunteers at the airport in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic, provide overnight lodging, transfer into Haiti by road, followed by accommodation, food, communication, medical supplies and security in Haiti. So far we have facilitated over 100 doctors and medical staff. -SHINE/CDRS facilitates 2-3 mobile health teams a day that go out to poor neighborhoods and provide on-site medical care to earthquake victims. The more serious patients are transported back to the hospital where they receive further attention. At present, these mobile health units are seeing up to 300 to 500 patients a day. - The agency is poised to set up a medical camp at a tent village. We hope to funnel doctors, medical supplies and donations of food and water to the earthquake-affected families seeking shelter in the village.

SHINE/CDRS is honored to have received the following note from Marie Lochard-Lubin, an RN who volunteered with SHINE/CDRS in the first week:

“I found that Mr. Shea was very resourceful. He conducted a meeting at the end of each day, so that we may be updated on his activities, to hear about our day, and to strategically plan our next day. Also during our daily meetings, he would update us on the news, medical stock, transportation status and he required us to provide him a list on what stock is needed. I don’t believed that any one was looking for everything to go 100%, but in spite of all obstacle Todd Shea did a great job. Todd would remind us almost daily that any issue we had to make sure that we address him. I do believe that it is everyone's responsibility to do your home work, regarding the status of a country before you decide to come on board. Overall Todd Shea was a great facilitator, and was very attentive to our needs.”

SHINE/CDRS’s efforts in Haiti also received a mention in a story on the State Department’s web site, at

http://www.america.gov/st/develop-english/2010/January/20100125092525smtotrob0.6124079.html

Our current fundraising total is in the excess of $58,541. Our thanks to each and everyone of you for your prayers and support. Looking ahead, we anticipate a six to eight week deployment in Haiti. At every stage, we need to be responsive to changing needs on the ground and do what it is that this small and nimble agency does best: fill the gaps in the system and work closely will all other agencies on the ground.

For the next week, we expect to continue to facilitate surgeries and trauma patients. There is a dire need for food and water for patients and their families. Following this, we expect to shift our focus to primary care, mother and child health, and aftercare. We are in the process of securing an additional four medical satellite facilities and hope to establish supportive relationships with four to five additional facilities led by other field agencies. The need for additional volunteers will continue to evolve with the changing ground realities. Right now, nurses are in short supply.

On a closing note, we wanted to highlight the effort of one of our youngest volunteers. Thirteen year-old Saanya Hassan Ali, of Washington D.C. designed beautiful "Hope Haiti" cards, and got her friends together to make over 100 cards. A couple of hours and e-mails later, there were so many orders and donations for almost $1,000 for SHINE/CDRS. Saanya, thank you!

A note of thanks also to all our volunteer teams and ground partners: AIMER Haiti, Destiny World Outreach, IMANA, NOAH NY, and NYC Medics. Without you all, none of this would have been possible.

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Contribute to Long-term Rebuilding in Haiti

By Karen Ashmore on January 27, 2010

Haiti Earthquake Recovery Update

Haitians frantically board tap-tap to leave Port-au-Prince
Haitians frantically board tap-tap to leave Port-au-Prince

The days following the earthquake were a busy and stressful time for Lambi Fund. Contacting staff and partner organizations proved to be a difficult task given the lack of phone service, power, internet and destruction of major roads to rural communities.

On January 16, 2010 staff in the US finally heard from Lambi Fund’s country director in Haiti. While staff in Haiti have been struggling to survive in a city that has been demolished, we here overjoyed to hear that all Lambi Fund staff members were alive and suffered relatively minor injuries.

January 18, 2010: Lambi Fund Country Director Josette Perard finally made it through the debris and checkpoints to our office space located in downtown Port-au-Prince. It sustained damages but is still standing! Important documents and equipment were salvaged for the time being as it lacked electricity needed for the office to be functional.

January 19-24, 2010: Staff have been working out of our Field Coordinator’s house; one of the few houses still standing that has electricity. Lambi Fund’s office building is being used as shelter for those that have been displaced.

Several Lambi Fund led regional meetings have convened in rural communities outside, under trees throughout Haiti. These communities are currently experiencing tremendous rates of outmigration that are severely stressing already limited resources. The 1,000’s of refugees streaming into these villages daily desperately need immediate relief. As such our local partner organizations and Lambi Fund have begun distributing major essentials like food, water and medical supplies to displaced persons. Shelters are in the process of being built as well.

January 25, 2010: Staff finally managed to purchase gas for Lambi Fund’s generator. The office has electricity, is up and running and is fully operational! Continued discussions with grassroots organizations in rural communities have led to the development of a four-phase recovery plan that will be critical in Haiti’s long-term recovery:

1. Distribute food and emergency essentials to those migrating from Port-au-Prince to rural areas. 2. Repair damage in rural communities 3. Expand sustainable agriculture programs to meet the increased demand for food in rural areas 4. Increase opportunities for sustainable income for those displaced by the earthquake so that the influx of people migrating to countryside can start earning sustainable livelihoods

Play a major role in expanding resources, rebuilding, and providing refugees with the means for economic livelihoods in rural communities by supporting this important long-term recovery program in Haiti today.

Members of local organizations meet with Lambi Fund
Members of local organizations meet with Lambi Fund

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Provide medical care to Haiti

By Deborah Kull on January 27, 2010

Update from Haiti

Our team is currently providing medical care via mobile clinics in nine geographic regions, including Petit-Goâve, Grande Goave, Petionville, Boloise, Carrefour, Jacmal, and Gressier, Leogane, and Miragoane. We are also working in one hospital and two static clinics.

Hôpital de l'Université d'État d'Haiti

The team is providing medical care at the 700-bed general hospital near the Presidential Palace, the Hôpital de l'Université d'État d'Haiti. Our physicians and nurses are working together with other nongovernmental organizations that have joined us in the hospital. We have established eight basic emergency operating rooms, and are currently providing medical supplies for the hospital.

Doctors and nurses are currently performing 30-50 surgeries and treating approximately 250 patients at the hospital daily. By request of the hospital administration, International Medical Corps is organizing triage and acute treatment of new patients. The acute triage center has seen over 240 new patients in last three days, and is receiving patients from outside clinics via a newly-established ambulance service. The hospital is partially intact structurally and about half of the buildings are currently in use.

International Medical Corps physicians assisted in significant reorganization of the hospital including establishing the first inpatient/post-operative unit in Port-au-Prince post-earthquake. Under International Medical Corps’ guidance, patient management and flow has recently improved and the hospital is now able to accept referrals (and is perhaps the only hospital accepting referrals right now which can provide overnight care).

Other hospital wards opened including medical/surgical and post-operative, and the hospital now provides for 24-hour care with 45 patients in the in-patient ward and another in-patient ward opening shortly. Electricity and water are available in some areas of the hospital. However, there are no laboratory or x-ray services, and the hospital is in the process of establishing a cold chain. Ultimately, the hospital will need reconstruction and refurbishment.

International Medical Corps is prioritizing the return of national staff, as very few have returned. We have also led a tetanus immunization program on the hospital campus and vaccinated over 300 people.

At the Marcel Cline Psychiatric hospital attached to Hôpital de l'Université d'État d'Haiti, there are now 7 male and 3 female in-patients. Pre-earthquake, the hospital had 50 male and 30 female patients residing there. There is currently no food supply. Approximately 250 people are camping on the grounds, of which 30 are psychiatric patients. International Medical Corps delivered psychiatric drugs and distributed guidelines to the hospital and the Ministry of Public Health. We have deployed two psychiatrists, including our Senior Mental Health Advisor. International Medical Corps places a special emphasis on mental health during emergencies.

Mobile Clinics and Field Sites: Reaching the Underserved

• Petit-Goâve: International Medical Corps is serving a population of 2,500 people in this area, where 100% of homes have been destroyed. Until now, no assistance has been delivered. People lack latrines and a safe water source. We are delivering basic health units to two clinics and a hospital. We are providing medical services at another hospital. Many people have fled the