Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

Fellow Mortals is more than a place. It is a living philosophy based on the belief that encouraging compassion in humans toward all life brings out the finest aspects of our humanity. Fellow Mortals provides excellent medical care to injured and orphaned wild animals entrusted to the hospital by the public. Fellow Mortals continues to advance treatment for the most critically injured and compromised animals admitted for care, demonstrated by a continued high rate of recovery and release back to the wild. Fellow Mortals also attempts to limit the number of animals admitted for care each year by offering public education to prevent unnecessary injury and orphaning, thereby reducing the total n...
Jul 13, 2012

Gallery of Guests

Benjamin, Eastern Screech Owl, with orphaned young
Benjamin, Eastern Screech Owl, with orphaned young

Many thousands of animals have come and gone at Fellow Mortals over the last 27 years, but a picture of any one individual brings back his or her story in full detail.

We'd like to share some of our favorite pictures with you, along with some stories. 

The thing to remember as you look at these images is that you are helping to make change possible every day because of your gifts to Fellow Mortals.

Thank you!

Benjamin, a screech owl, came to Fellow Mortals as a nestling with a fractured wing.  Although he would never be free, he ensured other healthy babies would be free--and wild--and raised dozens of young screech owls with his companion, Bonnie, during the 16 years he lived with us.

Millie, a white-tailed deer, came to Fellow Mortals as a fawn.  Toes on two feet were fractured and surgery was required.  She healed well and lived at Fellow Mortals for many years afterward.

Pretty, an immature red-tailed hawk, was found with two fractured wings that did not heal.  While she was with us, we gave her the time to enjoy the beautiful summer in a large enclosure with soft green grass and a view of the sky.

Kesha, a beaver, was injured when just a week old and arrived with a mortally-injured sibling.  She spent the first year of her life alone, but was then joined by a wild male beaver in her second year.  The two were released back to the wild together when Kesha reached maturity.

Mother Goose was another poor soul with terrible injuries suffered when she was hit by a car.  Her life with us was not long--but during that time she saved the life of the little gosling with her, who had lost her parents and all her siblings to another tragedy involving motor vehicles.

Hunny bunny was one of hundreds of cottontail rabbits brought to Fellow Mortals in 2010.  All cottontails are unique and we learn to identify them as individuals early on.  Through weighing and careful monitoring of what and how much they eat, we watch them grow to finally leave us for the beautiful woods and meadows of the wild world.

Millie, raised from a fawn
Millie, raised from a fawn
"Pretty," immature red-tailed hawk
"Pretty," immature red-tailed hawk
Kesha, orphaned beaver raised at Fellow Mortals
Kesha, orphaned beaver raised at Fellow Mortals
Mother Goose with adopted gosling
Mother Goose with adopted gosling
Hunny bunny, orphaned cottontail rabbit
Hunny bunny, orphaned cottontail rabbit

Links:

Jun 22, 2012

Wildlife Education on a Daily Basis

Swallows orphaned after the use of Tangle Foot
Swallows orphaned after the use of Tangle Foot

2012 has been very busy so far for the rehabilitators and interns at Fellow Mortals.  In some ways, that's a good thing because it means that people are aware of the wild creatures that share their backyards and their world and care enough to do something when a wild creature is found injured or orphaned.

Most injuries and orphanings that result in an animal being brought to the hospital are related to human activity or the human environment in some way.  Some things are difficult to prevent, like a nest of baby bunnies being discovered by the family pet in a fenced-in yard, or the bird that flies into a car that is going down the road.

Other things are totally preventable and we work hard to educate people about how to keep animals from being injured by dangerous products, like Tangle Foot--that is a sticky substance sold as a 'bird repellent' that actually kills and orphans birds, or live-traps used during baby season that trap nursing mothers and leave orphaned young behind.

Your donations help the wild ones brought to us from many different situations--but always by the most caring people.

Thank you for your continued support that is helping the hundreds of orphans and injured adults currently in care!

Cooper
Cooper's hawk baby orphaned when nest fell

Links:

May 30, 2012

Rushing into Summer

Nestling Great-horned owl
Nestling Great-horned owl

Hundreds of orphaned and injured wild animals have come and gone since I last wrote to you.  It's been a Very Busy Spring!

The attached photos show just a few of our current patients, including a nestling great-horned owl that was admitted with a fractured leg and slipped tendons--now outside with our foster great-horned owl, "Alberta," and six other owls who also were injured and came into Fellow Mortals for care.

Dozens of ducklings and goslings are also in care, including some that were hatched in our incubator after their parents were killed on the nest.

We are weaning our first group of squirrels, but were hand-feeding 80 babies at one point this spring.  To feed that many babies as often as necessary and keep them clean and comfortable takes 16 hours every day!

Right now the busiest place in the hospital is the Bird Nursery, where we are currently hand-feeding 70 baby birds every half hour (or more) a minimum of 24 times a day.

Our interns are a huge help in making sure all of these precious orphans get proper care.

While we are in the very midst of Baby Season--and it's not even officially summer yet--we continue to receive injured wild creatures for care, including hawks with fractured wings, rabbits hit by cars and birds colliding with windows.

We thank you for your donations that are helping so many wild creature who otherwise would not receive the professional care Fellow Mortals provides.

Mallard ducklings hatching
Mallard ducklings hatching
Sleeping Bunnies
Sleeping Bunnies
Great-horned owl
Great-horned owl 'branchers'
Baby grey squirrels
Baby grey squirrels
Welcome to Fellow Mortals
Welcome to Fellow Mortals

Links:

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