Women's Global Education Project

Women's Global Education Project was founded on the idea that everyone is entitled to an education, regardless of gender or economic status. We believe that universal education, gender equality and empowerment of women are critical to a society's development. Our mission is to provide access to education and develop training program that empower women and girls, particularly those in developing nations, to build better lives and foster equitable communities.
Dec 2, 2013

Thank you for making a personal impact for girls

Thank you for supporting Women's Global Education Project and our Sisters-to-School program in Senegal! Your support helps WGEP provide critical scholarships to more than 150 girls in rural Senegal, girls who otherwise would not have the chance to go to school. You are also helping us impact 3,000 of their family members, friends and neighbors, ensuring that entire communities are invested in the future of their girls.

To illustrate the power of education to change lives, we share the personal story of one of our recent graduates, written in her own words:

My name is Amy, and I am 20 years old. I entered the “Sisters-to-School” program in 2005 when I was in elementary school, and I am now finished with high school. My parents live off weak agricultural harvests that are insufficient for feeding the family. Our house is entirely made out of mud, which is not very solid and doesn’t hold up well in strong rainstorms. My village has an elementary school; although children go, girls often leave school very early and are confronted by many problems. I help my parents in the fields and with cooking; I do everything that villagers do. But now this doesn’t keep me from passing the high school graduation test with good scores.

 I had a hard time understanding classes, and my family had a lack of means to pay for school supplies and classes. I work as a housekeeper during vacation to earn a bit of money to bring to my family and to prepare for the upcoming school year. When my mother had twins, there was no one to help her with them. So that year, she almost asked me to give up my studies to help her. I was walking 8 kilometers a day to go to high school, without eating from morning until the nighttime. It was a very difficult  year of high school.

 Fortunately, my mother heard a presentation by teachers and understood the importance of education. The “Sisters- to-School” program educated our parents so that we could find tutors in Sokone, and came to our aid in many ways. I received  trainings, counseling, and advising. The program paid for my medications when I was sick. Tutoring helped me to better understand my classes, particularly classes like French and Spanish, for which I received high scores on my high school exams.

I will soon be attending college education. I will make the education of my daughter a priority because education is the key to success in life. I want to continue my studies through a PhD. My dream is to succeed and get a good job to help my parents out of poverty and suffering. I especially want to participate in the development of my country. I dream that this can become a reality!


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Sep 6, 2013

Growing Support for Girls' Education in Senegal

Community members discuss girls
Community members discuss girls' education.

With your help, Women’s Global Education Project is able to get out into rural communities and influence local perception pertaining to girls’ education, which is a vital component to achieving gender equality and advancing opportunities for girls. Reports show that between December 2013 and March 2013, our community education talks and seminars reached approximately 1800 people in Senegal. Sixty community talks and seminars were organized in 30 different locations. We’re thrilled with the level of outreach achieved as of March, and we’re confident we’ll see continued success in forthcoming reports detailing the remainder of this year!

Outreach event themes are centered around the importance of girls education, and discussions have pertained to keeping girls in school; relief for domestic and agricultural work; early marriage and pregnancy; violence against women; the importance of civil status and identification papers for children; and the issue of recurrent strikes within the Senegalese education system. Key people present for these conversations have included the presidents of the rural communities of Djilor and Toubacouta; the presidents of the associations of parents of students; the heads of the villages; the imams of the villages visited; the presidents of the Collectives of School Directors; school principals; the chairman of the Departmental Committee for the Promotion of Teachers of Education of Girls; those responsible for gender evaluation in schools; teachers; village health workers; and more.

The outreach meetings conclude with testimonies of satisfaction from the girls, parents, tutors and mentors. Meeting facilitators also report increased engagement of girls and their parents as a result of community talks and seminars. We are very pleased with the progress of these outreach efforts in shaping attitudes toward girls’ education, and we are so grateful for your continued support, which helps make all of this possible. We couldn’t do it without you!

Sep 6, 2013

Equipping Our Kenyan Scholars for Success

One of our Kenyan Scholars
One of our Kenyan Scholars

This month, we’re excited to report on the commitment of our sponsorship program in Kenya in helping girls to confront challenges and make good decisions. Thanks to your partnership, our scholars are gaining the knowledge and tools they need to navigate an environment unsupportive of girls and education through regular support group meetings.

In January, 137 of our primary and secondary scholars participated in a meeting for sponsored girls, and at a follow-up meeting in April, attendance numbers grew to 150. Meeting facilitators guided the girls through talks on issues related both to school and their personal lives. Topics of discussion included gender roles; personal hygeine and appearance; reproductive health and the dangers of Female Genital Mutilation; time management; good behavior, moral growth and self esteem; personal assertiveness; setting goals and achieving them; safety, and avoiding dangerous situations/bad company; prioritizing education over romantic relationships while they are young; and looking out for each other.

In the meetings, scholars also discussed their favorite subjects, as well as the importance of taking sponsorship seriously and working hard in school. The girls expressed their gratitude for their educational opportunities and vowed to continue to work hard in order to achieve success and a brighter future for themselves.

We are so happy with the growth and progress of our scholars in Kenya, and we sincerely thank you for your support in helping these girls reach their potential. Together, we’re having a real and lasting impact on girls’ futures!

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