Social and Economic Developers Association (SEDA)

SEDA sees a Laos where every child has an equal opportunity to reach their potential as a person and as a citizen. We envisage a country where each person is a productive contributer - helping to build an enduring, just and equitable society.
May 21, 2012

Postcard: Project Site Visit

with a SEDA weaving participant
with a SEDA weaving participant

Jacqueline Lee is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving who is visiting our partners’ projects throughout Southeast Asia. Her “Postcard” from the visit in Lao:

On April 26, I met with SouLy from SEDA in Vientiane, Lao to visit one of the schools that received funding for renovation and to visit participants of the Weaving Artisans - Micro Credit Project. Everyone in the village knew SouLy and greeted her upon arrival. She had been working with this specific community for some time.

SEDA was working with a specific village where the women are wives of handicapped military veterans - therefore usually the main income generator of the household. 

We visited 3 women who benefited and were part of this project. All three were highly grateful and dependent on the support of SouLy and SEDA for marketing and selling their work. Tuh, the 1st woman to do participate in this textile project in this village shared some of her beautiful work. She shared about her current situation while we all sat on her front porch next to her large weaving machine. Tuh was an orphan who went to work at the handicapped veterans camp where she met her first husband. Now Tuh was a widow - twice she was married and both times they passed away leaving her alone to support herself and her children. I asked her what she was able to do with the money earned - and she said finally buy a computer for her kids.  She had been a weaver before, which is a tradition passed down, but now with the market testing of quality, color etc. SEDA helped bring her products to the market. 

After, we met with another woman who was part of this project. We sat with her and her husband while she weaved. Her husband had lost both of his arms - but one wouldn't notice from the great big smile he had when he greeted SouLy and myself upon arrival and sat laughing and talking with us. Both husband and wife were warm and welcoming eager to speak with me despite the language barrier. 

I would like to thank SEDA and SouLy for her support and hospitality in accompanying me to visit this project and experience how GlobalGiving funds were used.

visiting the first SEDA weaving participant
visiting the first SEDA weaving participant
a weaving artisan with her husband
a weaving artisan with her husband

Links:

May 16, 2012

Postcard: Project Site Visit

at the SEDA supported school
at the SEDA supported school

On April 26, I met with SouLy from SEDA in Vientiane, Lao to visit one of the schools in Ban Phao (or Phao village) that received funding for renovation. Everyone at the school knew SouLy and greeted her upon arrival. She had been working with this specific school and village for some time.

This village's income generation is mainly from rice production, cassava, vegetables, and potatoes. The town consists of mostly farmers supplying these items to cities. In this town, there is an elementary and middle school but no high school - the children have to go to the next town for high school.

Walking around, I could hear laughter see kids playing and teachers congregating. A horn was blown, and the kids were being called back to class. These classrooms were no longer held in huts, but in solid structures allowing the children to study and learn in a sturdy and safe environment. 

I sat with two of the students who spoke to me about SEDA and the volunteers SEDA brought through to teach – they said they learned a lot of things like English, numbers, months, fruit, and conversation in English. One girl even said her favorite subject was English because it helped her to understand others that speak it. The teachers were happy to sit and speak with us also sharing their needs now with us - the school now needed science equipment to turn theory into practice, books, a library and computers.

I would like to thank SEDA and SouLy for her support and hospitality in accompanying me to visit this school and experience how GlobalGiving funds were used.

speaking with students
speaking with students
classrooms receiving renovation
classrooms receiving renovation
Renovated Classrooms
Renovated Classrooms

Links:

Mar 9, 2011

Micro-finance Expand into Cooperative Program

There are more than 50 villages where SEDA has identified the need
for microfinance. Credit is essential for production of cash crops
including rice, vegetables, livestock, mushroom, peanuts, fruits, tea and
coffee. Turn out very establishing and the raise awareness brings more
members. SEDA does not believe that it is appropriate or desirable for
outside organizations to lend its own capital. Inspired by the work of
Sahavikasa, an Indian cooperative development organization, SEDA believes
that mutual self-help will result in the durable and enduring results that
will benefit members not only this year, but for decades to come. SEDA is
in the process to expands the work with international partners like Global
Giving, and new partners as on it way to help outreach these efforts from
the pilot project to social enterprises base on business model. At this
stage the savings and credit cooperatives that benefit all the communities
in many region of the global world, if SEDA achieves this with international
supports, we will be the first cooperative successful in next two to three
years to come. We look forward to achieving far more in 2011 with large
numbers of new members participating in the program. We do urge many
donors, supporters, partners to continue your help us achieve what we will
needs to do. SEDA will also invites the central bank of Bank of Lao
government to also matching with our needs to help make this mission of
cooperative be successful in the future.