Civic Force

Develop a cross-sector collaboration platform aiming to immediately respond to disasters, collaborating with other sectors including the government, business and social sectors.
Nov 16, 2013

Civic Force ships emergency tents from Japan

Emergency tents
Emergency tents

On Wednesday, November 13, Civic Force staff oversaw the transport of 960 emergency tents from a storage facility in Fukuroi-shi to Nagoya port where they were loaded onto a cargo ship heading for the Philippines. The ship departed on November 15th and is expected to arrive in Cebu on November 25th where Civic Force and CDRC staff will receive the shipment and load them onto trucks that will take them across the sea to Leyte province. 960 families will benefit from these emergency tents which are big enough to accommodate a family of 5-10 persons. Civic Force will be distributing the tents in 3 municipalities in Leyte province.

Civic Force staff in storage facility
Civic Force staff in storage facility

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Nov 16, 2013

Civic Force staff in Manila coordinate with CDRC

Relief Delivery Operations banner
Relief Delivery Operations banner

Two project staff members from Civic Force arrived in Manila on November 15th and immediately conducted a meeting with its local partner organization CDRC to coordinate the financial and logistical operations of delivering relief goods to Leyte. Procurement of relief goods have begun in Manila and repacking will proceed as supplies arrive. Droves of volunteers are gathering at the CDRC headquarters to help pack goods, mobilize human and financial resources from local entities, and help in administration and finance matters. Civic Force and CDRC are coordinating with their staff who are on the ground in Cebu and Tacloban to gather information regarding areas that have not been served, security situation, and most importantly, logistics. Civic Force staff will head to Cebu in a few days to prepare the transportation of the relief packs and emergency tents to Leyte. 1,900 families are targeted to benefit from the relief packs, which will contain rice, dried fish and sardines, hygiene kits, sleeping mats, blankets and plastic sheets.

Volunteers mobilized at CDRC headquarters
Volunteers mobilized at CDRC headquarters
CDRC staff orienting volunteers
CDRC staff orienting volunteers
Civic Force and CDRC meeting on Nov. 15
Civic Force and CDRC meeting on Nov. 15
Aug 12, 2013

Monthly Report vol.27

Mental care and Reconstruction of Devastated Areas

 More than two years have passed since the Great East Japan earthquake. In devastated areas such as Miyagi and Iwate prefecture, tangible movements towards reconstruction such as debris removal, restoration of public infrastructure, construction of disaster public housing is underway. On the other hand, the psychological stress of disaster victims who have lost their loved ones or have faced significant changes in living conditions is immeasurable, and the need for psychological care is increasing in number.

  In particular, there have been recent cases where people cannot adapt to the new community after moving from temporary housing, and thus, becoming more reclusive from society.

 In the case of the Great Hanshin Awaji Earthquake in 1995, the number of victims who needed psychological care is said to have increased three years from the disaster, after physical safety and ordinary life stabilized among the disaster victims. In the disaster-struck Tohoku region, where similar circumstances are occurring, we came across people who support the lives of the disaster victims. These “mental experts=clinical psychologists” have been helping people solve their psychological needs according to their characteristics and situations.

  As of April 2013, the number of clinical psychologists certified by the Foundation of the Japanese Certification Board for Clinical Psychologists was 26,329. According to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, the ratio of clinical psychologists is one per approximately 7,000 people in Miyagi prefecture and 9,000 in Iwate prefecture, while the ratio in Tokyo is one per approximately 3,000, showing how the number of clinical psychologists in the disaster-struck Tohoku region is far below the national average. In particular, 70% of the clinical psychologists in the entire Iwate prefecture are concentrated in and around Morioka city. Especially for the coastal disaster areas where there were shortages of physicians and hospitals even before the earthquake, there is a greater need for psychological care, and the importance of clinical psychologists in the area is way above other prefectures.

  This month, we will introduce the activities of Iwate Society of Certified Clinical Psychologists, one of the efforts of NPO Partner Projects which supports NPOs established in devastated areas to respond to their needs. The Iwate Society of Certified Clinical Psychologists carried out their activities in the coastal disaster areas soon after the earthquake, as “specialists” offering various mental cares in cooperation with Iwate prefecture, municipal administrations and private organizations.

If you need further information, please find our homepage.(www.civic-force.org/english)


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