Civic Force

Develop a cross-sector collaboration platform aiming to immediately respond to disasters, collaborating with other sectors including the government, business and social sectors.
Jan 13, 2015

Monthly Report vol.40

Thank you for your continuous support for Civic Force.

More than 320,000 people dead, about 620,000 people injured and about 220 trillion yen of economic loss—. According to an announcement by the government, these are some of the estimated damages that will result from the anticipated Nankai Trough Earthquake. The government set a goal to reduce this figure by 80 percent by taking measures in the next 10 years.

Attaining this goal means that concrete measures must be taken in each area because the government and local municipalities are limited in terms of what they can do. Civic Force is now focusing all its efforts on disaster preparedness by utilizing the experiences and lessons learned in its activities following the 2011 disasters.

The 40th monthly report focuses on a disaster drill conducted in Aichi Prefecture on June 15, and a joint drill conducted on June 20 and 21 in Okayama Prefecture, which was organized by the Self-Defense Forces.

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Sep 12, 2014

Monthly Report vol.39

 The Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, has long been affected by many earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions,
floods, and typhoons. Every year, these areas suffer various kinds of damage caused by natural disasters. A report by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction(UNISDR), indicated that 75% of the death toll from natural
disasters between 1970 and 2011 occurred in the Asia-Pacific region. It also pointed out that Asia is the most
vulnerable region in the world against disasters. Being located in the trans-Pacific earthquake zone, which experiences frequent typhoons, is one of the causes of huge loss of life after disasters. One important feature of this
region is that most Asian cities are highly populated and many people live near the sea or rivers. Most of the Asian
countries are still emerging nations, so outbreaks of disasters could exacerbate poverty.

Meanwhile, after experiencing the Great East Japan Earthquake, Japan is also facing challenges in reducing risk
from disasters. Since March 11, 2011, the Japanese government has received offers of aid from 163 countries
and regions, and 43 international organizations. However, they were not utilized effectively because local governments
that should have functioned as disaster response hubs were affected and thus failed to identify the true needs of disaster victims. Issues involving mutual coordination among various groups, including the central government,
non-governmental organizations, companies, and the Self-Defense Forces, were also highlighted.

In order to tackle such challenges, Civic Force established the “Asia Pacific Alliance” (APADM) in 2012 together with
organizations involved in disaster aid activities in the Asian region. The Alliance aims to bridge the government and
local authorities of a country with companies and NGOs through borderless cooperation. If all parties share and
utilize information, human resources, capital and goods among various countries on the same footing, aid could be
provided faster in times of disasters.

Over the years, as we accumulated experience in disaster aid, we have emphasized the necessity of structuring the
cooperation mechanism among organizations. We are now making efforts to strengthen this cooperative framework in
preparation for natural disasters which have become more frequent in recent years. In regard to the said activities, much progress had been made in the month of May. This month, the 39th Monthly Report focuses on the 2nd general assembly of the Asia Pacific Alliance, the international symposium, and a training program for junior officers involved in disaster management in Asian countries.

Please find the attachment for the further information. 


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Jun 20, 2014

Monthly Report vol.38

Thank you for your continuous support for Civic Force.

Three years ago in May 2011, many volunteers from all over the country came to work in the areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake during the Golden Week and other holidays. They removed mud and cleaned up debris. Many other people have also participated in volunteer activities organized by NPOs, so the year 2011 is called “the first year of the new volunteer movement.”

More than three years have passed since the disaster and the number of visitors to  the affected areas is gradually declining.

On the other hand, the aid activities have diversified away from collecting donations and working in the areas, and various aid methods have been created.

One way to support long-term reconstruction is “to buy” products from the disaster areas. Products made in these areas include traditional handcrafts dating back to before the disaster, industrial products backed by excellent technology, and delicious food items grown in the nature of Tohoku. Buying these products is one casual way of supporting the region.

Some of the NPOs and companies Civic Force has been supporting through the “NPO Partner Projects,” are creating attractive products.

This 38th Monthly Report focuses on the “recent activities” of our partner NPOs, such as “Peace Jam,” which support mothers in disaster-hit areas,and “Peace Nature Lab,” which sells sweets made from local ingredients.


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