Japan Emergency NGO (JEN)

We put our utmost efforts into restoring a self-supporting livelihood both economically and mentally to those people who have been stricken with hardship due to conflicts and disasters. We do so promptly, precisely, and flexibly by fully utilizing local human and material resources, considering this the most promising way to revitalize the society.
Mar 6, 2015

The temporary school buildings

Snowing on the temporary school buildings
Snowing on the temporary school buildings

Most of refugee children in Iraq do not have schools in 2014, this is because the schools far away from the camps. The other reasons of the schools in the cities centers, which cannot assimilate the large numbers of refugee students, are more than the half of Iraqi refugees in the camps of Kurdistan cities. The Kurdistan government prepares 66 caravans, using it as schools for the refugee students and 46 schools (caravans). Now, it still does not prepare the requirements like desks, blackboards, books, copybooks and teachers.

These caravans do not assimilate 15% from the refugee students in Kurdistan, we ask all of the humanitarian organization and the Iraqi government to prepare the enough schools for them.  The fact is they loss two scholastic years and we do not know how many other years they will be loss.

The government requires a manger of the Department of Education (DOE) to install 200 caravans for the classrooms of the refugee students and 20 caravans for the latrines. Now, still only 15 schools (caravans) are prepared at the suburbs. The Iraqi government provided 500 caravans for the other suburbs as 80 caravans for each of the DOE.

Although there is the lack of the school buildings for the refugee students, the international society must be aware of supporting the children with the facilities for the children’s study.

2.1 million people, from the refugees have very hard conditions in the hardiness of the cold weather, more than 100 children and babies dead in this winter.      

 

The Displaced Students

 

As we train teachers and students to raise their hygiene; health and environmental awareness, distribution of hygiene, and cleaning materials for them in schools covered by JEN project. 

We have noticed that there are the numbers of displaced students from other governorates. They have been enrolled in these schools. We have made a statistic about their numbers. It has been agreed with the authority on the need to provide them with hygiene like the rest of the students and add other materials to them. Where it was agreed to:

  • Provide all school administrations with 24 cans of lice shampoo to treat the injured students;
  • Provide each of the pupils displaced with the following materials (bottle of shampoo to wash their hair, bottle of liquid soap to wash their hands as well as large-sized towel).

The materials were purchased and transferred to the place where we arrange materials, according to the share of each school.

We met the school administrations in the presence of environmental education and school health official in the Department of Education (DOE). We talked with them on the need for special attention to the displaced pupils and distribution of materials on them. We asked them to tell us the date of Parents and Teachers Council hold in the second semester of the school year in order for us to attend, and in cooperation with the school administration gives parents of students some guidance pertaining to the public and personal health and pay attention to hygiene. We also delivered the school administrations CD disk containing items of training curriculum to be used to educate students and their parents in different occasions.

Also, subsequently we delivered school administrations the materials allocated to them; we visited the schools and participation with school administrations in distribution of materials to the displaced students and gave them advice concerning cleanliness importance and some guidance that raised their health and environmental awareness.   

This initiative has won the thanks and appreciation the DOE officials and the administrations of schools and student in turn; they gave thanks to the Japanese people in general and in particular to JEN.    

 

Distribution of Winterization items vouchers – Preparation phase 

 

JEN is preparing the voucher distribution for Internally Displaced Persons (IDP). This voucher can be used as a payment for winterization items such as heater, kerosene, and blanket so on.

There are three ways to distribute items to people in needs. The first way is that NGO procures items and distribute them directly to people. The second one is that NGO distribute vouchers to people and people buy pre-identified items at pre-appointed shops. The last one is that NGO provide cash to people and people buy what they need at their selecting shops.

The best way to distribute items is up to the situation of area where NGO is working. For example, immediate after natural disaster the distribution of cash or voucher is not realistic because the most of shops and logistics are not working. As for IDP assistance in Kurdistan, taking into consideration that needs among families hugely varies and shops are properly functioning in the area, JEN decided to distribute vouchers.

The most important activities in preparation phase are the assessment/registration of voucher recipients as well as the arrangement with local shops.

For the assessment/registration of voucher recipients, JEN staff visits household by household and collect the information of household such as ID card, the number of family members, and the current situations, by using smartphone applications.

In local shops which agree to participate in our voucher scheme, JEN staff explains shop owners about the administrative procedures and terms and conditions so on, by visiting one by one.

Every time we visit people and talk with shop owners, we are getting more confident that this voucher distribution could accurately response people’s needs and could contribute the business increase in the host community.   

 

Mar 6, 2015

JEN's supporting role in Zaatari Camp

A completely rehabilitated WASH facility
A completely rehabilitated WASH facility

In normal life, we are having toilets and showers in our homes and we do not recognize their importance in our lives unless we lose them. In fact, we think about that importance only when we have to replace a fitting or properly facing lack of water which might be occurs only a few times per year.

However, in a disaster or emergency situation, refugees resorting in camps are unfortunately forced to share necessities including toilets and showers. Humanitarian organizations such as JEN are responsible for ensuring that refugees have access to these facilities, which can sometimes be difficult to manage when there are over 84,000 refugees in one location, such as the case in Zaa’tari refugee camp. JEN puts its utmost efforts into making sure that all public toilets within its responsible areas in the camp are accessible, clean, and safe to use.

Regrettably, there is a small minority with a narrow perspective who continuously vandalize public toilets on purpose. In these unrespectable cases, refugees who will be most affected are the refugees who are most vulnerable.

JEN works to repair these public toilets on a continuous basis and in some circumstances completely rebuilds toilets that have had all their parts vandalized. JEN maintains these public toilets because access to safe and clean toilets is essential to protect the health of the refugees and prevent the spread of communicable diseases.

In the other hand of rehabilitation, sometimes there is a need of establishing a new facility to accommodate the continuous influx of refugees into the Zaa’tari camp where they set up homes in a location without operational public facilities. Recently, JEN completed a construction of a new public toilet in one of these newly occupied areas. With this facility, more than 300 refugees will be able to access a WASH facility near their home and make their life easier.

We believe these achievements will ensure a better life for refugees in the camp, and JEN will continue to support them with the best efforts.

 

Snow Storm Huda in Za’atari Camp

Early in January 2015 forecasters predicted a snow storm. It looked serious enough to name so they called it Huda. Less snow was expected in Amman than in 2013, but the government declared a public holiday the day before anyway.

JEN holds the responsibility for storm-dewatering in the camp. This means that when it rains we call in trucks with large tanks and hoses and vacuum pumps and suck up the water. So while many of the staff delighted at the unexpected holiday those who live closest to camp as well as the JEN maintenance team members gathered to go over the emergency plan for responding to the storm. They divided in to two shifts of 5 people each, so that we could maintain operations over night if needed. We reviewed the maps of where water accumulated last time. We established how we would communicate during the operations.

The morning of the storm brought a lot of strong wind. The emergency team spent most of the day tying down water tanks that we had thought were too heavy to blow away, we had been wrong the wind was strong enough to take them. The protective tarp and part of the roof blew off of one of the caravan that we work from. Around mid-day the rain started. Light initially, but growing increasingly heavy. The emergency team leader, Rami, called in the de-watering trucks. Three at first, then three more, then a few hours later he called four more.

Temperatures fell, the rain turned to snow. The second shift had to join the first because there was too much for them to handle alone. My phone rang and buzzed non-stop with urgent requests for a truck to help. Even some of the caravans were taking on water. Streets were flooded so that emergency vehicles couldn’t get through. The storm water flowed into septic tanks causing them to overflow. One of the schools was flooded endangering their supply of text books. Tents were collapsing under the weight of the snow. We arranged to have 12 trucks the next day.

When the sun came up the next day the water and 10-12 cm of heavy snow covered the ground. The trucks removed water as quickly as they could but the snow started melting faster than the trucks could work. More rain and snow fell. Other organizations brought in special trucks to clear out the septic tanks. Again the JEN team worked late into the night to stabilize the water levels.

The third day was also exceedingly long and cold. Another organization brought in additional trucks to support with de-watering. The JEN team persevered and by the time the left late at night they felt that they had made significant improvements – about 60% of the water had been removed and pumped outside the camp. That night temperatures dropped well below freezing. All the roads in the country were closed because they were covered in ice.

As the sun rose on the 4th morning the calls started again and our exhausted JEN team bundled up and went back out to keep working. Throughout the day the situation came more and more under control. We were able to reduce the number of trucks working and reduced the response to daylight hours. Nevertheless, it wasn’t until almost a week later that all water was removed and the normal routines in the camp could return to normal.

After all was said and done, Huda caused a lot more trouble in the north of Jordan than in Amman. People who had lived in the area their entire life said they had never seen anything like it. JEN’s emergency team rose to the challenge; braving extreme cold, and really wet conditions.

Dewatering is a muddy job !
Dewatering is a muddy job !
Feb 20, 2015

Monthly Sri Lanka/Reviewing the past 10 years

Beneficiaries
Beneficiaries

During the past 10 years since the end of December 2004, we have been able to support living of more than 200,000 people by receiving about 620 million yens for emergency aid from Ajinomoto Co. Inc., the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Kao Corporation, Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Insurance Inc. , Japan Platform, Japan Team of Young Human Power, Chabo!, Felissimo, Smile Heart Club of Mitsui Sumitomo Insurance Co., Ltd. Management Organization for Postal Savings and Postal Life Insurance, Yomiuri Light and Humanity Association and many other individuals.

3 year- assistance to the victims of the tsunami in the south of Sri Lanka
More than 30,000 people died in Sri Lanka due to the tsunami occurred in December 2004. Just on the next day of the tsunami, JEN dispatched its staff to the affected area and started to distribute urgent daily necessaries to the households that were going to move to the temporary housings in Hambantota District.

For the affected people who were living a brutal life because they had lost not only their family members, house and household goods but also their income source, we conducted job training (making coconut rope, fishing net, vegetable garden and so on) and group counseling for children through after-school activities in order that they could get new skill and regain positive force.

We have been able to rehabilitate living of more than 33,000 afflicted peoples during 3 years, and completed final self-reliance assistance project in the South by the end of 2007.

Holding a marketing workshop to increase incomes

A month after JEN held the Agricultural Training Workshop during mid-December, we held the next one that will contribute to increasing the incomes of our beneficiaries—the Marketing Workshop. Our main objective was to have our beneficiaries learn about how to efficiently sell agricultural products by gaining knowledge and skills in rural marketing.

To do so, we invited a facilitator who specializes in rural marketing in Northern Sri Lanka, and included topics such as:

1. 4 pillars of marketing (product, price, place, promotion)

2. Rural markets and customers

3. Quality improvement, price determination, distribution, selling techniques

4. Developing business plans

The workshop included lots of group works so that we could avoid too much lectures and have the participants were well-focused throughout the day. For example, the participants did role-playing. They were grouped and did a selling competition game by holding shops for fruits, vegetables, bags, stationary, etc. JEN staffs acted as consumers and walked around the room to see if they are convinced into buying products from each shop. It seems hard for our beneficiaries to practice any selling techniques and they just mentioned, “”What do you want? That is xxx rupees,“ as they lacked the knowledge. So the facilitator was able to assess the knowledge level of the participants based on this activity and include useful topics and group activities in the workshop.


At the end, the participants developed business plans using the marketing knowledge and skills they learned during the workshop. Each group was able to explain about their target customers, selling points of their products, price determination and selling methods.

Most of JEN’s beneficiaries live in areas where access to the local markets are limited, which deprives them of communicating with consumers directly. And they have to be dependent on middlemen who, in many cases, offer an unfair price to buy their agricultural products. We hope that the beneficiaries come up with better selling methods to increase their incomes by using the knowledge and skills they learned in the Marketing Workshop.

Interview to a beneficiary in Mullaitivu District

I’m living at Manakandal GND in Mullaitivu District with my three children. I got injured by shelling during last battle in my stomach. There are shells into my stomach without remove. I had problem to do hard work, out of my home to cate my family. I struggled a lot to manage daily life without fix income.

I am walking up and down every day around 1 km, to fetch water for my domestic use. JEN choose my family as beneficiary and provided seed, long term plant, barbed wire and workshop to start agriculture activities. I attended three workshops so far, such as community strengthen, agriculture and marketing. Workshop on agriculture gave me enough confident in my life. Especially training on compost making and organic pesticide killer are the new to me. Currently, I have started to make compost and organic pesticide killer. It is take time to make it. But, it is cost effective and healthy for our life.

I have cultivated black gram. I hope, I will be able to use organic pesticide killer to the black gram. Once black gram cultivation over, I will do land preparation for vegetable garden. At the time, I will use compost to fertilize land.
My dream is to build my life without dependability with the support of JEN’s assistance.  My joy is working into my garden with my children in a non-organic free environment. I thank to JEN and Japanese people a lot once again.

Getting advices from the facilitator
Getting advices from the facilitator
Beneficiary and black gram land
Beneficiary and black gram land

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