Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors

Our Vision That people, wildlife and habitat survive and prosper without being detrimental to the existence of each other. Our Mission To be the most effective wildlife conservation organisation in the world through the delivery of outstanding outcome-based programs and projects, and inclusive of humanity.
Dec 23, 2013

Crikey It's Christmas!

Dear Wildlife Warriors,

On behalf of Terri, Bindi and Robert Irwin, and the entire Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors family, we would like to wish all of our donors, supporters and friends a safe and happy holiday season!

We would also like to take this time to thank you for your commitment to wildlife conservation. You have helped us save critically endangered and threatened animals in Australia and around the globe.

As you know, one of the major projects of the charity is the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital. This year, the hospital reached a significant milestone with over 50,000 animals being treated since opening in 2004. We treated, rehabilitated and released back into the wild all of Australia's iconic species, including the koala, kangaroo and sea turtle, and many of its lesser known species such as the echidna, green tree frog and bandicoot.

Nearly 500 species have been brought into the hospital by community members, wildlife carers, the Zoo's rescue team and other animal rescue organizations. No native wildlife is turned away, and all costs are covered by the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, which was the vision of Steve and Terri Irwin.

"When Steve and I started the wildlife hospital in memory of Steve's mum, Lyn, our dream was to provide the best care possible for any animal, any species, that was found injured, orphaned or distressed in Australia, no matter the cost. We had no idea that in less than 10 years we would have treated over 50,000 animals. It's a sad reflection of what is happening in our communities that so many koalas and other animals are brought into the hospital, but we are grateful that we have a world-class facility and dedicated staff who are saving these animals, literally one by one. " -- Terri Irwin

The holiday season, which is Australia's summer, coincides with the hospital's busiest trauma season. As a result, our inventory of food and medicine is running low and our resources are stretched as more animals are admitted to the hospital this time of year.

We would be grateful if you would consider making a contribution to the Wildlife Hospital this holiday season.

To make a tax deductible gift in the USA or elsewhere, please go to http://globalgiving.org/projects/australia-zoo-wildlife-warriors/

To make a tax deductible gift in Australia, please go to http://everydayhero.com.au/event/azwh_wishlist

Thank you from the hearts of our wildlife,

Cynthia Thompson

Director of Development - Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors

Oct 23, 2013

Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital

Phil and Ben the Tawny Frogmouth Chicks
Phil and Ben the Tawny Frogmouth Chicks

Phil and Ben the Tawny Frogmouth Chicks

Age: Juvenile Sex: Unknown Weight: 150 gramms each

Phil and Ben were found by a member of the public on the ground after being abandoned by their parents. They were transported to The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by the concerned people who found them.

Phil and Ben were very bright and alert when they arrived at the hospital but very hungry.  With her first visual assessment Dr Amber noticed that Phil was not standing very well on his left leg.  After anaesthetising him, an X-ray was taken of Phil's leg and Dr Amber found it was fractured.  Ben's condition was good, with no injuries. Ben needed no treatment except for some hydration with fluids.  Dr Amber created a light splint for Phil's leg to support the fracture during healing.  The prognosis for a successful outcome is greatly improved because Phil is such a young bird.

Phil and Ben have been placed in the care of a specialist bird rehabilitator who is very experienced with Tawny Frogmouths. The rehabilitator will not only raise the chicks, they will have to be taught to hunt for their food and what is suitable food for them to eat.

Tawny Frogmouths have a varied diet of snails, slugs, worms, small mammals, reptiles, frogs, small birds and nocturnal insects. Tawny frogmouths often end up at our hospital after being hit by cars as they have a tendency to hunt beside roads at night feeding on insects attracted by the street lights.

Jul 23, 2013

Thank you to all the Wildlife Warriors out there!!

Summer, a common brushtail possum joey in care.
Summer, a common brushtail possum joey in care.

To our Wildlife Warriors

Thank you for all of your support these past few months. The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hosptial saw almost 6000 patients come through the doors last year alone and this year is no different. The last couple of months have been a little quieter, but our staff are preparing themselves for the busy season, also known as trauma season.

Trauma season sees patient numbers increase as a lot of the mammals are out to breed. This means these animals are searching into unfamiliar territory to find themselves a mate, and may end up crossing roads and backyards. This increases their risk of domestic pet attacks and possibly being hit by passing vehicles. These are the two most common reasons animals are admitted to the Wildilfe Hospital, making up around 70% of our patients.

Last year we had 888 koalas brought through our doors and during the busy months we can have up to and sometimes over 100 koalas in care at any given time! That's a lot of work for our staff and volunteers. The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so our staff can provide immediate attention to patients in need. We also have lots of volunteers who give up their time to come and help out at the Wildlife Hospital. They clean, garden, enter data, greet people coming to visit the facility and some, with enough experience get to help feed some of our patients! We are so greatful to all of our volunteers and our wonderful donors who, with their help we wouldn't be able to continue saving wildlife!

Here is a list of the patients admitted to the hospital in the first half of this year, bearing in mind the next half of the year is going to get a lot busier!

January - 710

February - 472

March - 403

April - 380

May - 353

June - 323

That's already over 2600 patients!

Thank you again for all of your support. It is most appreciated and our wildlife thanks you for it!

Yours in conservation

Anna the black swan cygnet. So fluffy!
Anna the black swan cygnet. So fluffy!
Ong a pied cormorant had 4 fish hooks stuck inside
Ong a pied cormorant had 4 fish hooks stuck inside
Callista, our first koala to have a tracheostomy!
Callista, our first koala to have a tracheostomy!

Links:

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $25
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $125
    give
  • $150
    give
  • $200
    give
  • $500
    give
  • $4,500
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $125
    each month
    give
  • $150
    each month
    give
  • $200
    each month
    give
  • $500
    each month
    give
  • $4,500
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?